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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 8, 1998
LONDON -- Pigeons pelt it. Tourists flood it. Cars choke it. And Londoners either love it or loathe it, depending on the gridlock.Trafalgar Square is a patch of concrete, bronze and marble that still arouses great passion more than 150 years after its modern makeover. This is where buses lurch at pedestrians like wounded bulls in a Spanish ring, where protesters launch campaigns and soccer fans celebrate and riot.And now, Trafalgar Square is poised to become the scene of another quintessentially British public rite -- the struggle over art.Yesterday, plans were unveiled to temporarily place three sculptures atop a plinth that has remained barren since its 19th-century creation.
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NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 15, 2005
LONDON - Silence is not easy to come by in London, ever, especially on the streets at noon in the capital's center, where the sounds of buses and taxis and people and life thump 24 hours a day, every day, like a vibrant heart. Silence, though, cloaked London for two very long minutes yesterday, a pause and a sound that said as much about this city as anything before. Tears were in no short supply. Neither was a living, breathing sense of unity. Hokey as that may sound, if you lived here, even if you were just visiting, you could feel it. Earlier in the week, leaders had called for Londoners to fall silent precisely at noon yesterday, and for two minutes that is what they did. At Trafalgar Square, which so often has served as the meeting quarters for Londoners to protest and to pray, to sing and to celebrate, people began to gather well before noon.
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FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 30, 1997
I will be going to Sarasota, Fla., for a few days in late December and want to catch a marlin. Where can I charter a boat? How much would it cost?You're fishing off the wrong pier. Charter-boat operators we contacted said that while a marlin might be found in the deeper parts of the Gulf of Mexico, the fish is more like the baseball team that has adopted its name: It lives closer to Miami, in the Atlantic.But that doesn't mean there aren't some challenging angling opportunities off Sarasota.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 7, 2005
LONDON - Britons shinnied up lampposts yesterday, scaled public monuments, stood jammed side by side and heel to toe on public squares or crowded on balconies high above the gathering crowds. They waved flags large and small, enjoying themselves while they could. The British can be accused of a lot of things, but optimism isn't one of them, so it was time to have a laugh before an expected defeat rained down like a London shower, washing away their dreams. The British, it seemed, were doing what the British do: getting just excited enough to be genuinely disappointed when their hopes come crashing down.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 15, 2005
LONDON - Silence is not easy to come by in London, ever, especially on the streets at noon in the capital's center, where the sounds of buses and taxis and people and life thump 24 hours a day, every day, like a vibrant heart. Silence, though, cloaked London for two very long minutes yesterday, a pause and a sound that said as much about this city as anything before. Tears were in no short supply. Neither was a living, breathing sense of unity. Hokey as that may sound, if you lived here, even if you were just visiting, you could feel it. Earlier in the week, leaders had called for Londoners to fall silent precisely at noon yesterday, and for two minutes that is what they did. At Trafalgar Square, which so often has served as the meeting quarters for Londoners to protest and to pray, to sing and to celebrate, people began to gather well before noon.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | May 30, 1994
LONDON -- The names echoed off the National Gallery and around Trafalgar Square as the Rev. Derek White read from a roster of 617 people who died homeless in London in the past year.About 200 demonstrators, many ragged and scruffy and unwashed street people, gathered yesterday at the base of the square's towering statue of Admiral Horatio Nelson to protest Prime Minister John Major's condemnation of beggars as "offensive" and "eyesores."Mr. Major, campaigning for the ruling Conservatives in European parliament elections June 9, made his remarks in a newspaper interview Friday, and repeated his criticism the next day, saying his view is "what I think millions of people in this country feel."
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 7, 2005
LONDON - Britons shinnied up lampposts yesterday, scaled public monuments, stood jammed side by side and heel to toe on public squares or crowded on balconies high above the gathering crowds. They waved flags large and small, enjoying themselves while they could. The British can be accused of a lot of things, but optimism isn't one of them, so it was time to have a laugh before an expected defeat rained down like a London shower, washing away their dreams. The British, it seemed, were doing what the British do: getting just excited enough to be genuinely disappointed when their hopes come crashing down.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 9, 1996
LONDON -- The streets of downtown London aren't even safe for the pigeons anymore.Hundreds, perhaps even thousands, of the world's most famous pigeons are missing from their favored concrete feeding ground in the shadow of Nelson's Column at Trafalgar Square. The stolen birds are presumed to have been sold off to pie-making restaurants.The stomach-flipping whodunit has bedeviled police and outraged the flocks of tourists who trek to Trafalgar Square and pay for the privilege of feeding the birds.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | December 17, 1991
LONDON -- The IRA is like the Grinch: It is trying to steal Britain's Christmas.And as it was with the infamous (although eventually rehabilitated) villain created by the late Dr. Seuss, nobody here thinks they'll succeed."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2006
What's the point? -- Google Earth, which offers maps and satellite pictures of more and more localities every day, created a lot of buzz when it launched. As it gets updated, there are ever more oddities visible from satellite to be spotted all over the world. Recent posts have spotlighted giant sculptures in Germany, rooftop graffiti in San Francisco, a crowd in Trafalgar Square and the shadow of a teddy bear recorded on an Oregon beach during a kite festival. What to look for --You can search by locality to see satellite images sorted by place.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 8, 1998
LONDON -- Pigeons pelt it. Tourists flood it. Cars choke it. And Londoners either love it or loathe it, depending on the gridlock.Trafalgar Square is a patch of concrete, bronze and marble that still arouses great passion more than 150 years after its modern makeover. This is where buses lurch at pedestrians like wounded bulls in a Spanish ring, where protesters launch campaigns and soccer fans celebrate and riot.And now, Trafalgar Square is poised to become the scene of another quintessentially British public rite -- the struggle over art.Yesterday, plans were unveiled to temporarily place three sculptures atop a plinth that has remained barren since its 19th-century creation.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 30, 1997
I will be going to Sarasota, Fla., for a few days in late December and want to catch a marlin. Where can I charter a boat? How much would it cost?You're fishing off the wrong pier. Charter-boat operators we contacted said that while a marlin might be found in the deeper parts of the Gulf of Mexico, the fish is more like the baseball team that has adopted its name: It lives closer to Miami, in the Atlantic.But that doesn't mean there aren't some challenging angling opportunities off Sarasota.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 9, 1996
LONDON -- The streets of downtown London aren't even safe for the pigeons anymore.Hundreds, perhaps even thousands, of the world's most famous pigeons are missing from their favored concrete feeding ground in the shadow of Nelson's Column at Trafalgar Square. The stolen birds are presumed to have been sold off to pie-making restaurants.The stomach-flipping whodunit has bedeviled police and outraged the flocks of tourists who trek to Trafalgar Square and pay for the privilege of feeding the birds.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | May 30, 1994
LONDON -- The names echoed off the National Gallery and around Trafalgar Square as the Rev. Derek White read from a roster of 617 people who died homeless in London in the past year.About 200 demonstrators, many ragged and scruffy and unwashed street people, gathered yesterday at the base of the square's towering statue of Admiral Horatio Nelson to protest Prime Minister John Major's condemnation of beggars as "offensive" and "eyesores."Mr. Major, campaigning for the ruling Conservatives in European parliament elections June 9, made his remarks in a newspaper interview Friday, and repeated his criticism the next day, saying his view is "what I think millions of people in this country feel."
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 9, 2003
LONDON - British soldiers were still at war in Iraq yesterday, police here were on high alert - again - for a terrorist attack and millions of commuters were prepared to endure yet another strike by workers in the city's crumbling subway system. For months, this has been a subdued capital city, divided by war, saddened by attacks against its people, most recently in Turkey, its politics getting increasingly nasty and its residents, understandably, seeming to wondering when things might be right again.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | January 18, 1991
LONDON -- Britain, its pilots flying wing-to-wing with Americans and Saudis on the multiple air sorties in the Persian Gulf, moved its heavy armor up to the Saudi-Kuwaiti frontier yesterday for the eventual opening of a ground campaign.The government of Prime Minister John Major, the United States' most staunch ally in the 28-nation coalition, also joined the Bush administration in rejecting any "pause for thought" in the bombardment of Saddam Hussein's military machine.Mr. Major stressed in the House of Commons that the war had only just begun and that Iraq remained a potentially dangerous foe.Mr.
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