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NEWS
June 8, 2011
Cheers to Dan Rodricks ' column "Trashing tradition" (June 5) deploring the mistreatment of our country's flag. It's disturbing to see people putting Memorial Day American flags in trash cans, even when it's "more likely done out of ignorance" or a "busy, distracted, pop culture-absorbed" life than out of any deliberate disrespect for tradition. The media could do more to sensitize these citizens who have forgotten what our flag stands for. Samuel A. Culotta, Baltimore
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FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia and For The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Date: Aug. 2 Her story: Catherine "Cat" Yard, 25, grew up in Ewing, N.J. She is an artist and regularly models for figure drawing and painting classes at Maryland Institute College of Art , the Johns Hopkins University, Towson University and the Mitchell School of Fine Arts in Baltimore. She and her husband are ensemble cast members performing with the Baltimore Rock Opera Society in "The Electric Pharaoh," which opens Oct. 17. Her parents, Kathleen and Duane Yard, live in Ewing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | August 15, 1999
What would you do if you gave a party for someone who then wasn't able to make it? You might spend the time with your other guests talking about the missing honoree and his accomplishments. That's exactly what members of Oyo Traditions, a Baltimore Afrocentric cultural arts organization, did when Chief Ogundiya of Nigeria could not make the party.Oyo sponsored a Baltimore visit for the African traditional healer, but hours before his scheduled welcoming reception at the Eubie Blake Cultural Center, the organization learned that he wouldn't be able to make it. That didn't keep party guests from coming, and discussing the African religion of Ogun, in which Ogun-diya is a chief priest.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
It's hard to imagine what the snarling football coaches of yesteryear — think Bear Bryant or Woody Hayes — would have made of the poetry on the helmet and sleeves of the uniforms the University of Maryland played in Saturday. But the Under Armour designers of Maryland's "Star-Spangled" uniforms, which highlight the Francis Scott Key poem "Defence of Fort M'Henry" in cursive, would like to think that the old-school coaches might have approved. The uniforms, which the Terrapins wore in Saturday's home loss to West Virginia, were intended to promote the team and inspire players and fans.
NEWS
August 15, 2014
While George W. Liebman offers an interesting viewpoint on Maryland's response to Central American children seeking refuge in our country ( "O'Malley takes on another 'pop' issue," Aug. 6), his opinions don't acknowledge the reality and immediacy of the needs of this population or Maryland's history of accepting those who have been marginalized in their home countries. At its founding, Maryland served as a safe haven for those fleeing religious persecution and has continued to welcome those from beyond its borders.
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
On July 21, at Washington, D.C.'s Carnegie Institution, Tanya Tucker and Rose Gray each walked down separate aisles toward the building's rotunda, where they would be married. "I walked out toward Rose, and it was like the first time seeing her," says Tanya. "I felt so lucky, blessed and excited. " Starting Tuesday, gay couples in Maryland will be able to experience the same wedded bliss. With the passage of Question 6 in November, Maryland became one of the first states, along with Maine and Washington, to pass a referendum legalizing same-sex marriage.
NEWS
By Shaun Borsh | December 25, 2002
CHRISTMAS traditions throughout the world contribute to the way Americans celebrate the holiday. From Germany, lighted candles evolved into our twinkling lights on decorated trees. The poinsettia plant seated at the fireplace hearth hails from Mexico, and the original Saint Nicholas used the stockings of needy children for his gift giving. Many of our rituals have passed from generation to generation, bringing with them fond memories of celebrations past. Like other American families, one of our Christmas Eve traditions was born from sheer necessity: toy assembly.
NEWS
By Matthew Brunwasser and Matthew Brunwasser,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 2002
BREZNITSA, BULGARIA - It's hard to believe this colorful village festival was once considered political subversion. The shirtless wrestlers slathered in olive oil, marching bands, horses decorated in flowers and carpets, and hordes of guests bearing gifts of socks, corn and bread are part of a three-day Muslim circumcision ritual, called a sunet, which recently drew about 2,000 people from throughout the Pirin Mountain region of southwest Bulgaria....
FEATURES
By Sujata Banerjee and Sujata Banerjee,Evening Sun Staff | March 27, 1991
A DAINTY, MOTTLED cat paws at the dining room window of Sarah Ban Breathnach's Takoma Park home, asking to be let in. Perhaps she is thinking about sampling the tea and scones set out on the lace-draped table; more likely, she wants a caress behind the ears from the mistress of the house and author of "Mrs. Sharp's Traditions," a nostalgic book of Victorian family traditions, crafts and games."Victorians had a rich family life because they had seasonal traditions," says Ban Breathnach over a cup of tea. "It's so much to look forward to every year, giving both adults and children a sense of comfort and joy."
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 10, 2002
Shavuot might not get the attention of the better-known Jewish holidays. But next week's festive holiday, which celebrates the receiving of the Torah at Mount Sinai, has a slew of cherished traditions -- from all-night Torah study sessions and confirmation services to decorating synagogues with foliage and feasting on cheesecake. "It's a wonderful holiday," said Dr. Gary Gross, a Columbia veterinarian and member of the Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education in Columbia. "Every year, I try to stay up and study."
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
As the former wide receivers coach at Maryland, first-year head coach Lee Hull is intent on adding a passing element to Morgan State's offense. But tailback Lamont Brown III hopes Hull won't overlook what has been the unit's traditional strength: running the football. “I look at myself and Herb [Walker Jr.] as two of the top running backs in the [Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference],” said Brown, a redshirt sophomore. “Whether [Hull] wants to run the ball or we have to get involved with the passing game, we're still going to be there, and he has two of the best running backs in the league and can't forget about us.” Brown, redshirt sophomore Walker and senior Tracy Martin make up a formidable partnership in the offensive backfield.
NEWS
August 15, 2014
While George W. Liebman offers an interesting viewpoint on Maryland's response to Central American children seeking refuge in our country ( "O'Malley takes on another 'pop' issue," Aug. 6), his opinions don't acknowledge the reality and immediacy of the needs of this population or Maryland's history of accepting those who have been marginalized in their home countries. At its founding, Maryland served as a safe haven for those fleeing religious persecution and has continued to welcome those from beyond its borders.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
The weekend begins on Wednesday nights in Annapolis with the blast of a starting gun. That's when dozens of sailboats jockeying in the Severn River harbor head to the starting line for the Annapolis Yacht Club's Wednesday night races, a summer tradition in this waterfront community since the 1960s. What began as "beer can races" - just a casual event to break up the week - has become serious business for the sailors, as well as for City Dock bars and restaurants. "This is real sailing," said Bobby Frey, the yacht club judge who runs the races, which are perfect for the competitive sailors who don't have the time to travel the country to regattas.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | July 31, 2014
With very little notice being taken in Harford County, one of the most widely-observed holidays on earth was celebrated this week: Eid ul-Fitr. The movable feast was observed on Tuesday as people of the Islamic faith celebrated the conclusion of the holy month of Ramadan, whose beginning and end each year also are variable. During Ramadan, Muslims fast during the daylight hours, perform works of service and generally renew their faith. For most people in Harford County, the observance of Ramadan and its traditions have been rather mysterious.
NEWS
July 31, 2014
The problem isn't the 57,000 or so illegal immigrant children who have crossed the border recently, or the 12 million illegal immigrants who are already here. The problem is the billion or two behind them who are thinking about heading this way. Once that billion or two come to believe that we'll let them stay they'll be on their way. When that happens, America will cease to be the place where Americans live. Instead, we'll have no say in who sets up shop here. The U.S. as a meaningful entity will cease to exist.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
"Once you've seen it, you've seen it," said Tom Shutt of Hershey, Pa. Still, Shutt and his wife Martha returned Wednesday to Chincoteague Island in Virginia, their seventh trip since 2000, to see "it" - a herd of wild ponies swimming from Assateague Island to Chincoteague. After 89 years, the pony swim follows a strict tradition. About 150 ponies are herded from their year-round home on Assateague Island across a channel to Chincoteague, where they are paraded through the streets to the island's carnival grounds.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | September 5, 2006
When Hecht's officially becomes Macy's on Saturday, the aim is to hold on to some local traditions of the venerable Baltimore-area department store chain in a nod to customer nostalgia. But there won't be much to keep: Two private-label brands are staying and much of the work force will remain. The frequent coupon sales offered at Hecht's will largely disappear in favor of everyday deals on select merchandise. The challenge for Macy's as it remakes itself in Baltimore is that Hecht's does not have a signature product, such as candy or a traditional parade, that stands out as do some of the other 10 regional chains that Federated Department Stores is buying from May Department Stores.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2000
Tugged by tradition and tousled by a warm spring wind, 10,000 people lined Eastern Avenue in Baltimore yesterday to celebrate the 179th anniversary of Greek Independence Day with a parade, prayers and feasting. For the Greek immigrants who settled so thickly in the southeast corner of the city's Highlandtown that their neighborhood was eventually dubbed "Greektown," it was a day to remember the villages they left behind. For their children and grandchildren, it was a day to return to their village -- an urban enclave built around St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, where Greeks and other immigrants so dominated the shops and restaurants, churches and taverns that English was the foreign tongue.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | July 11, 2014
Sometime in 1914, Luigi DiPasquale, who had left his home of Abruzzi, Italy, came to Baltimore and opened a corner store in Highlandtown. Ever the entrepreneur, he butchered and sold meats and also sold live goats tethered in the backyard. This week I spoke with his grandson, Joe DiPasquale, who continues the unbroken family tradition 100 years later. His business at 3700 Gough St. remains true to its original vision while adjusting to the times. Today, DiPasquale's Italian Marketplace is a thriving destination.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
The home at 203 Lambeth Road in Baltimore's Guilford neighborhood comes with a surprise - a completely renovated, contemporary interior behind a traditional brick exterior. "Here is a house for the most discriminating buyer who wants the best of both worlds: a functional suburban interior flow within the shell of a Guilford home," said listing agent Cindy Conklin with Prudential Homesale YWGC Realty. Located on a double lot totaling 0.82 acres, the 1986 home features a symmetrical front elevation with a second-story balcony.
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