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By Douglas Nivens II, For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
I had a surreal experience at a bridal store looking for dresses with my honored attendants.  Just as my fiancé and I are not wearing matching garments, neither will our attendants. First, we have a mixed gender party, so our guys are wearing suits and our gals are wearing dresses.  Second, our attendants are following our color preferences - my party will be wearing navy blue, his will wear red.  The guys will have a relatively easy time because all we must do is go to a men's formalwear store and pick a tuxedo.
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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Picky, Wordville's British honorary consul, recommends consideration of the peroration of A.J.P. Taylor's English History 1914-1945 . "The rhythm is particularly effective, I think," he says. Let's have a look:   In the second World War the British people came of age. This was a people's war. Not only were their needs considered. They themselves wanted to win. Future historians may see the war as a last struggle for the European balance of power or for the maintenance of Empire.
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Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | July 21, 2013
My new book concerns the countercultural views of today's progressive Democrats. This is not your father's liberalism, and it is certainly far removed from the local Democratic Party I was exposed to as a young kid growing up in Arbutus. That Democratic Party was blue collar in orientation and pretty conservative to boot. Its platform was pro-labor, pro-life, pro-gun, and it was led by small businessmen - many of whom were longtime chairmen of legislative committees in the Maryland General Assembly.
FEATURES
By Douglas Nivens II, For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
I had a surreal experience at a bridal store looking for dresses with my honored attendants.  Just as my fiancé and I are not wearing matching garments, neither will our attendants. First, we have a mixed gender party, so our guys are wearing suits and our gals are wearing dresses.  Second, our attendants are following our color preferences - my party will be wearing navy blue, his will wear red.  The guys will have a relatively easy time because all we must do is go to a men's formalwear store and pick a tuxedo.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | December 6, 1992
For Michael Medved, the film that broke the critic's back was "The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover," a Peter Greenaway movie he screened in the spring of 1990.It wasn't just the variety of disgusting actions that appear in the film -- all cataloged in Mr. Medved's book "Hollywood vs. America: Popular Culture and the War on Traditional Values" (HarperCollins, 1992) -- it was that his fellow critics lauded it with words like "splendid" and "profound."Mr. Medved, who gives his critiques on PBS' "Sneak Previews," thought it was time to say that the emperor had no clothes.
NEWS
July 26, 2013
Robert Ehrlich Jr.'s comments on America's traditional values and the GOP making a comeback are just wishful thinking on his part ("Democrats stray far from America's traditional values," July 21). Unless the GOP changes its viewpoint on a number of issues - and from Mr. Ehrlich's column it doesn't appear as if that will happen - it will be a while before the GOP gains a majority again or sees one of its own in the White House. Let's start with abortion: The GOP wants to make laws limiting abortion after 20 weeks of pregnancy.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | October 28, 1993
At the women's club -- one of those refuges of tasteful furniture and pre-blow-dryer hairdos -- one member asks Ellen Goodman about the semantics of rape vs. date rape, and, minutes later, another reminds her to say hello to her son-in-law, who also writes columns for the Boston Globe.The personal and the political. Of course. That's been Ellen Goodman's beat since she began writing a newspaper column in 1976. Some of her most recent takes on issues ranging from the familial to the global have just been published in a collection titled, "Value Judgments" (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, $22)
NEWS
October 9, 2003
OF THE MANY reasons to admire Peter Agre of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, let's begin with this one: Dr. Agre has long been a proponent of the idea that you can be a successful scientist and have a fulfilling family life at the same time. He's an active father of four who lives in Stoneleigh, with a day job in East Baltimore. He's self-effacing, popular among his colleagues, and, oh yes, he's one of two winners of the 2003 Nobel Prize for chemistry. Dr. Agre first appeared in The Sun in 1995 with a letter to the editor praising the performance of Mandy Patinkin in Evita, and going on to commend the actor for his decision to take a break from a television series in which he was appearing to spend more time with his family.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 17, 1994
Parents: Think twice if your child wants to watch "M.A.N.T.I.S.," "Melrose Place" or "The Simpsons."At least that's the advice from the Media Research Center, a conservative watchdog group, which unveiled a guide yesterday Washington to prime-time television shows based on how the programs portray "traditional values."Shows were faulted if they appeared to condone premarital sex, parental disrespect and gun control.The group watched more than 8,500 hours of prime-time TV, more than 70 shows, and rated each.
EXPLORE
February 24, 2012
I was disheartened to hear that this very controversial issue (legalizing gay marriage) has passed the House of Delegates. An issue like this that is to the core of many people's values and beliefs should be left up to the people to decide, as was the case with gambling in our state. I was opposed to gambling but the people voted. I believe in the sanctity of marriage and the traditional values we have stood by for centuries that marriage is between a man and a woman. I understand that everyone has a right to live the way they want but a marriage union goes much further beyond just what is someone's :right.
NEWS
July 26, 2013
Robert Ehrlich Jr.'s comments on America's traditional values and the GOP making a comeback are just wishful thinking on his part ("Democrats stray far from America's traditional values," July 21). Unless the GOP changes its viewpoint on a number of issues - and from Mr. Ehrlich's column it doesn't appear as if that will happen - it will be a while before the GOP gains a majority again or sees one of its own in the White House. Let's start with abortion: The GOP wants to make laws limiting abortion after 20 weeks of pregnancy.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | July 21, 2013
My new book concerns the countercultural views of today's progressive Democrats. This is not your father's liberalism, and it is certainly far removed from the local Democratic Party I was exposed to as a young kid growing up in Arbutus. That Democratic Party was blue collar in orientation and pretty conservative to boot. Its platform was pro-labor, pro-life, pro-gun, and it was led by small businessmen - many of whom were longtime chairmen of legislative committees in the Maryland General Assembly.
EXPLORE
February 24, 2012
I was disheartened to hear that this very controversial issue (legalizing gay marriage) has passed the House of Delegates. An issue like this that is to the core of many people's values and beliefs should be left up to the people to decide, as was the case with gambling in our state. I was opposed to gambling but the people voted. I believe in the sanctity of marriage and the traditional values we have stood by for centuries that marriage is between a man and a woman. I understand that everyone has a right to live the way they want but a marriage union goes much further beyond just what is someone's :right.
NEWS
September 28, 2011
I just finished reading an article in a local publication that went as far to name various fishing communities such as "Tangier Island, Smith Island, Crisfield, Cambridge, St. Michaels, Oxford, Kent Island, Rock Hall and others in Bay Country" as being in " the middle of a poaching epidemic of unreal proportions. " The article goes on to describe this problem as being linked to illegal drug use. While some of what the author describes may be true to a much lesser extent, I have grown angered and frustrated by some, but not all, of these so-called journalists leaving the general public with such a negative impression of the watermen community.
NEWS
By Lawrence Harrison | June 1, 2009
Palo Alto, Calif. -President Barack Obama has encouraged Americans to start laying a new foundation for the country - on a number of fronts. He has stressed that we'll need to have the courage to make some hard choices. One of those hard choices is how to handle immigration. The U.S. must get serious about the tide of legal and illegal immigrants, above all from Latin America. It's not just a short-run issue of immigrants competing with citizens for jobs as unemployment approaches 10 percent, or the number of uninsured straining the quality of healthcare.
NEWS
By TRACY WILKINSON and TRACY WILKINSON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 10, 2006
VALENCIA, Spain -- Maria Pilar Hervas, a teacher, remembers the insults hurled her way when she walked through the streets with her five children. Large families were out of fashion in fast-modernizing Spain. "People treated me as though I had committed a crime" by producing such a large brood, Hervas said yesterday as she listened to Pope Benedict XVI extol the virtues of the traditional family, and of marriage between man and woman, to a gigantic gathering of faithful. The pope was concluding a visit of scarcely more than 24 hours to lend his support to an international meeting of families, and to drive home what he considers to be a central tenet of his papacy: There are basic truths that must not be marred by fads and the "dictatorship of relativism."
NEWS
By Linda Cotton | October 5, 1990
THE WORLD Summit for Children ended last week with a whimper. Limos lined up outside the United Nations to take home kings and presidents who left armed with little more than platitudes and cheap sentiment. For a moment, though, the attention of the American public was diverted from the gulf, the gas pump and the rising price of beer to the plight of 40,000 children under 5 who are dying every day from diarrhea, measles and malnutrition. For a moment we shook our heads and collectively sighed about what a pity it was that so many kids have to suffer this way.But the real pity is that it is not just Third World children who are abused, denied medical care, going hungry or living in squalid conditions.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | July 1, 1993
Conventional wisdom has Hollywood discovering "traditional values," ratcheting down the violence quotient and rolling out PG movies to capture the family market. Exhibits A through F: Six of the current top-10 money-making movies are rated PG or PG-13.Yet in their happy midst sits "Menace II Society," as sad and savage a depiction of urban violence as you'll ever see, currently the ninth best-selling movie in the country. Without box-office stars or advance hype and promotional tie-ins, the R-rated "Menace" has become one of those rare movies that has everyone from George Will to your next-door neighbor talking:Is its portrayal of alienated, trigger-prone black youth realistic or stereotypical?
TOPIC
By William W. Falk and William W. Falk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 20, 2005
FOR MUCH of the 20th century, African-Americans left the South in huge numbers. Millions migrated to cities in the North in search of better economic opportunities and social acceptance. But, in the past 30 years, there has been a radical turn in black migration back to the rural South. Maryland has played roles in all of this. It has been a place to which blacks migrated - primarily Baltimore but also some of Maryland's suburban counties, particularly Prince George's, the first majority-black suburban county in the United States.
NEWS
By Andrew J. Cherlin | February 14, 2005
VALENTINE'S DAY will undoubtedly bring the usual paeans to love and marriage that warm commentators' hearts. But although Americans are into love, they are surprisingly ambivalent about marriage. And that ambivalence is on display in, of all places, Arkansas. Tonight, Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee and his wife will convert their marriage to a "covenant marriage" in front of an arena full of couples in North Little Rock. Spouses who choose Arkansas's covenant marriage option must agree to limit the grounds for a quick divorce to transgressions such as infidelity or abuse and to seek counseling before the divorce is granted.
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