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NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 9, 2004
ORANGE FARM, South Africa - Alice Motsie believes a cure for AIDS may be on the middle shelf of her refrigerator, beside a slab of butter and a liter of milk. This is where Motsie, a traditional healer, keeps a stainless steel decanter containing a murky-brown brew of African potato, herbs, roots and bark, which she says has cured dozens of her patients of AIDS, as well as keeping her a fit-looking 55. "It's powerful," Motsie says, pouring herself a glass of the mixture before knocking it back like a shot of whiskey.
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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2005
In a way, Dr. Michael S. Torbenson's trade card collection reveals as much about medicine as the tissue samples he studies for a living at Johns Hopkins Hospital. One card hypes the healing power of Dr. Kilmer's Complete Female Remedy, said to purify the blood and tone the nerves. Another plugs the promise of Lydia Pinkham's Vegetable Compound, which "guaranteed" a baby in every bottle. Still another promotes the relief in store for users of Lash's Bitters Tonic Laxative, blended to alleviate any ailment of the liver or kidneys.
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NEWS
By Mark Drajem and Mark Drajem,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 17, 1998
NEW DELHI -- When asthmatics or insomniacs, those with clogged arteries or cancer visit the large Apollo Hospital, the treatments are no longer limited to intravenous drips or surgery. The patients might be told to sniff natural oils, meditate or stretch the body like a cobra.The Body-Mind Institute, backed by self-help author Dr. Deepak Chopra, is bringing traditional Indian medicine into this modern U.S.-style hospital on the outskirts of India's capital city.Upper-class Indians, it seems, are rediscovering their country's traditional medicine -- everything from herbal medicines to meditation to astrology.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 9, 2004
ORANGE FARM, South Africa - Alice Motsie believes a cure for AIDS may be on the middle shelf of her refrigerator, beside a slab of butter and a liter of milk. This is where Motsie, a traditional healer, keeps a stainless steel decanter containing a murky-brown brew of African potato, herbs, roots and bark, which she says has cured dozens of her patients of AIDS, as well as keeping her a fit-looking 55. "It's powerful," Motsie says, pouring herself a glass of the mixture before knocking it back like a shot of whiskey.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2000
One of the country's largest criminal cases targeting alternative medicine ended yesterday with jurors deadlocked over charges that a Baltimore businessman fraudulently sold people aloe vera as a treatment for cancer and AIDS. In another setback to federal prosecutors, the jury acquitted a second defendant, the Oklahoma man whose company grew and processed the aloe vera used in the treatment and who also faced fraud charges. After deliberating nearly 30 hours over six days, the jury reached a unanimous verdict on only one of the charges in the 20-count indictment against Allen J. Hoffman and his Baltimore-based company, T-UP Inc. The jury found Hoffman not guilty on one count of mail fraud.
NEWS
By SHELLEY COLE MORHAIM | March 2, 1994
In the ancient system of Chinese traditional medicine, the year is divided into five seasons: spring, ruled by the element of wood; summer, ruled by fire; early autumn, ruled by earth; late autumn, ruled by metal, and finally winter, which is ruled by water.Each season has its place on the wheel of the year, its associated organ systems, activities, tastes and emotions, and each is intimately linked to the other four. In this system a meal must contain all five flavors -- spicy, bitter, sweet, sour and salty -- in order to be fully satisfying.
BUSINESS
By Jane Applegate and Jane Applegate,Times Mirror Square Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 | April 22, 1991
When he was learning to do hip replacements, Dr. Hank Wuh, a young orthopedic surgeon, was frustrated by the slow and potentially harmful method used to remove the cement securing an old artificial joint before replacing it."Taking out the old cement was tedious, the blood loss was high and there was always the risk of fracturing the femur, or thigh bone," says Wuh.After much experimentation, Wuh and his co-inventor, Dr. Albert Chin, developed a patented cement extraction system now marketed worldwide by Origin Medsystems Inc. in San Mateo, Calif.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2005
In a way, Dr. Michael S. Torbenson's trade card collection reveals as much about medicine as the tissue samples he studies for a living at Johns Hopkins Hospital. One card hypes the healing power of Dr. Kilmer's Complete Female Remedy, said to purify the blood and tone the nerves. Another plugs the promise of Lydia Pinkham's Vegetable Compound, which "guaranteed" a baby in every bottle. Still another promotes the relief in store for users of Lash's Bitters Tonic Laxative, blended to alleviate any ailment of the liver or kidneys.
FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2001
COLUMBIA - Simon Mills, a distinguished British authority on herbal medicines, had just given his most exhilarating pitch for the United States' first graduate program in botanical healing when a hand lifted tentatively in the audience. The young woman looked perplexed. What credential, she wondered, would this new graduate school in Columbia give to legitimize unlicensed practitioners - described through history as apothecaries, phytotherapists, wise women, white Indians, medical herbalists and even snake oil salesmen?
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Staff Writer | December 4, 1993
Tom Peterson stretched comfortably across an examining table at the Centre for Traditional Acupuncture in Columbia, thin needles sticking out like quills from his forehead, feet, hands and bare chest.It was just a "checkup," said the 62-year-old Baltimore resident, who started acupuncture years ago to treat chronic hay fever. "I still have it, but it is much milder."Although tens of millions of Americans like Mr. Peterson have turned to acupuncturists, chiropractors, massage therapists and other practitioners of alternative medicine, they would not get any encouragement from President Clinton's health reform legislation.
FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2001
COLUMBIA - Simon Mills, a distinguished British authority on herbal medicines, had just given his most exhilarating pitch for the United States' first graduate program in botanical healing when a hand lifted tentatively in the audience. The young woman looked perplexed. What credential, she wondered, would this new graduate school in Columbia give to legitimize unlicensed practitioners - described through history as apothecaries, phytotherapists, wise women, white Indians, medical herbalists and even snake oil salesmen?
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2000
One of the country's largest criminal cases targeting alternative medicine ended yesterday with jurors deadlocked over charges that a Baltimore businessman fraudulently sold people aloe vera as a treatment for cancer and AIDS. In another setback to federal prosecutors, the jury acquitted a second defendant, the Oklahoma man whose company grew and processed the aloe vera used in the treatment and who also faced fraud charges. After deliberating nearly 30 hours over six days, the jury reached a unanimous verdict on only one of the charges in the 20-count indictment against Allen J. Hoffman and his Baltimore-based company, T-UP Inc. The jury found Hoffman not guilty on one count of mail fraud.
NEWS
By Mark Drajem and Mark Drajem,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 17, 1998
NEW DELHI -- When asthmatics or insomniacs, those with clogged arteries or cancer visit the large Apollo Hospital, the treatments are no longer limited to intravenous drips or surgery. The patients might be told to sniff natural oils, meditate or stretch the body like a cobra.The Body-Mind Institute, backed by self-help author Dr. Deepak Chopra, is bringing traditional Indian medicine into this modern U.S.-style hospital on the outskirts of India's capital city.Upper-class Indians, it seems, are rediscovering their country's traditional medicine -- everything from herbal medicines to meditation to astrology.
NEWS
By SHELLEY COLE MORHAIM | March 2, 1994
In the ancient system of Chinese traditional medicine, the year is divided into five seasons: spring, ruled by the element of wood; summer, ruled by fire; early autumn, ruled by earth; late autumn, ruled by metal, and finally winter, which is ruled by water.Each season has its place on the wheel of the year, its associated organ systems, activities, tastes and emotions, and each is intimately linked to the other four. In this system a meal must contain all five flavors -- spicy, bitter, sweet, sour and salty -- in order to be fully satisfying.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Staff Writer | December 4, 1993
Tom Peterson stretched comfortably across an examining table at the Centre for Traditional Acupuncture in Columbia, thin needles sticking out like quills from his forehead, feet, hands and bare chest.It was just a "checkup," said the 62-year-old Baltimore resident, who started acupuncture years ago to treat chronic hay fever. "I still have it, but it is much milder."Although tens of millions of Americans like Mr. Peterson have turned to acupuncturists, chiropractors, massage therapists and other practitioners of alternative medicine, they would not get any encouragement from President Clinton's health reform legislation.
BUSINESS
By Jane Applegate and Jane Applegate,Times Mirror Square Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 | April 22, 1991
When he was learning to do hip replacements, Dr. Hank Wuh, a young orthopedic surgeon, was frustrated by the slow and potentially harmful method used to remove the cement securing an old artificial joint before replacing it."Taking out the old cement was tedious, the blood loss was high and there was always the risk of fracturing the femur, or thigh bone," says Wuh.After much experimentation, Wuh and his co-inventor, Dr. Albert Chin, developed a patented cement extraction system now marketed worldwide by Origin Medsystems Inc. in San Mateo, Calif.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 26, 2003
A scientific panel convened by the World Health Organization has recommended guidelines for doctors conducting clinical studies of SARS patients. The panel urged doctors to apply the guidelines in analyzing the mounds of potentially useful information about various therapies that were collected in this year's epidemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome. Much of that information has not been published or analyzed. It "is a matter of urgency to get better analysis and review," said Dr. Simon Mardel, a WHO official who led the two-day meeting that ended Friday.
EXPLORE
By Diane Pajak | December 14, 2011
Looking for an alternative to pharmaceuticals? Try heading east. Chinese herbs and acupuncture are the remedies of choice at Cheng's Acupuncture & Herbs Clinic, which opened in February in Columbia. The clinic is run by licensed acupuncturist Chengzhang Shi, who is certified by the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. He specializes in traditional Chinese medicine, which he first learned from his father, a traditional Chinese medicine professor in Beijing.
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