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By ELLEN JAMES MARTIN | August 18, 1991
Are you exasperated with the chores your house requires, yet unwilling to move to a condo where you can't take the cocker spaniel or grow tomatoes without approval from a committee?Then you have a lot of company.People still want the prestige and freedom that accompanies the traditional single-family home and landscaped yard, housing experts say. Yet career and family schedules are making them increasingly unhappy with the upkeep imposed by such homes."When it comes to housing, this is the generation of ambivalence," says Dorcas Helfant, president-elect of the National Association of Realtors, based in Washington.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
Organizers of Baltimore Pride, which occurred last month in a new location for the first time in years, will host a town hall meeting to hear feedback on the changes from members of the public. The event is scheduled for 7 p.m. July 23 in the Mason Lord Room of the Waxter Center, home of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore, which organizes and hosts Pride each year. Kelly Neel, the group's interim executive director, said in an email that the goal of the meeting is "to explain the process behind facilitating a major Pride event and its challenges, and to hear feedback from the community about what worked this time around and what didn't.
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BUSINESS
November 22, 1998
The number of U.S. households with home equity loans reached 9 million in 1997, according to a report released by the University of Michigan's Survey Research Center.The report, conducted from May to October 1997, found the percentage of homeowners with either a traditional home equity loan or a home equity line of credit was 13 percent, just two percentage points higher than the 11 percent of homeowners with home equity loans in 1988.But, with an increase in U.S. households and homeowners in the decade, the total number of home equity borrowers increased 38 percent, from 6.5 million in 1988 to 9 million in 1997.
NEWS
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
With a new addition and dozens of amenities - including space for thousands of bottles of wine - the home at 14123 Mantua Mill Road in Baltimore County stands out. "Brookfield is one of the most compelling properties in Worthington Valley," said Heidi Krauss of Krauss Real Property Brokerage, the listing agent for the property. "[It is] stellar in every way. " The 122-year-old estate in Glyndon recently sold for $3.5 million. The new owners are enjoying close to 9,000 square feet of living space in the traditional home that sits on nearly 33 acres of land cradled in the rolling hills of Maryland's fox-hunting country.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | April 19, 2013
Orioles center fielder Adam Jones has purchased a five-bedroom home along Falls Road in Lutherville for the price of $1.75 million. The seller is one Malcolm Cameron according to state records. He's better known as Cam Cameron, the offensive coordinator fired by the Ravens toward the end the most recent season, which ended in a Super Bowl victory. He bought the home for $1.5 million in July 2011, three years after joining the Ravens following a one-year stint as head coach of the Miami Dolphins.
FEATURES
By Patricia Leigh Brown and Patricia Leigh Brown,New York Times News Service | May 25, 1993
I am looking at a 23-year-old shingled house by a pond in suburban Chicago, contemplating the meaning of zing. It is the presence of zing, "in all its colorful forms," Traditional Home magazine says, that makes this house such a joy to behold.You would not have found the word zing in HG, a magazine that long served as an urbane arbiter of taste (may it rest in peace). But throughout their history, home magazines have been a Rorschach test of American values. If the announcement of HG's closing and the rise of magazines like Traditional Home are any indication, Americans have grown weary of visual repartee.
NEWS
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
With a new addition and dozens of amenities - including space for thousands of bottles of wine - the home at 14123 Mantua Mill Road in Baltimore County stands out. "Brookfield is one of the most compelling properties in Worthington Valley," said Heidi Krauss of Krauss Real Property Brokerage, the listing agent for the property. "[It is] stellar in every way. " The 122-year-old estate in Glyndon recently sold for $3.5 million. The new owners are enjoying close to 9,000 square feet of living space in the traditional home that sits on nearly 33 acres of land cradled in the rolling hills of Maryland's fox-hunting country.
BUSINESS
By Beth Smith and Beth Smith,Special to The Sun | March 26, 1995
John and Judy Hasler's house would be perfectly at home in Colonial Williamsburg -- stained a traditional yellow with green shutters with a steeply pitched cedar roof and dormer windows.But the owners are quick to dispel the notion that the house is 18th-century perfect."This is definitely not a reproduction of a Williamsburg home, but its style is greatly influenced by the 18th-century homes of Tidewater Virginia," says Mrs. Hasler, 57. "We adapted it for the way we wanted to live."Working in close collaboration with Baltimore architect Wesley Burton, the Haslers helped create the ambience of a Colonial home while incorporating a floor plan that lends itself to a comfortable 1990s country lifestyle.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
Organizers of Baltimore Pride, which occurred last month in a new location for the first time in years, will host a town hall meeting to hear feedback on the changes from members of the public. The event is scheduled for 7 p.m. July 23 in the Mason Lord Room of the Waxter Center, home of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore, which organizes and hosts Pride each year. Kelly Neel, the group's interim executive director, said in an email that the goal of the meeting is "to explain the process behind facilitating a major Pride event and its challenges, and to hear feedback from the community about what worked this time around and what didn't.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1996
In just a few months, Coldspring New Town has been transformed from a neighborhood where architecture fans have found the most avant-garde homes in Baltimore. It's gone positively suburban.As the largest construction project of new houses in the city nears completion, the 103 vinyl-sided houses at the "Woodlands at Coldspring" are nearly sold out.The project's decidedly suburban name and conservative style of architecture are hardly what the creators of Coldspring envisioned 20 years ago when they designed a futuristic community of concrete, pueblolike houses in North Baltimore, west of the Jones Falls Expressway.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | April 19, 2013
Orioles center fielder Adam Jones has purchased a five-bedroom home along Falls Road in Lutherville for the price of $1.75 million. The seller is one Malcolm Cameron according to state records. He's better known as Cam Cameron, the offensive coordinator fired by the Ravens toward the end the most recent season, which ended in a Super Bowl victory. He bought the home for $1.5 million in July 2011, three years after joining the Ravens following a one-year stint as head coach of the Miami Dolphins.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 16, 2000
Ruth Martin, a former nursing home worker, saw the need for alternative care for the elderly long before assisted-living homes began proliferating in Carroll County. "I felt there had to be some kind of alternative for people," said Martin, who began operating an assisted-living facility, Country Companions, about five years ago. "There were so many people in nursing homes that didn't require nursing care. This kind of care was somewhat unheard of." A decade ago, about 20 assisted-living facilities operated in the county, compared with 50 today.
BUSINESS
By Adele Evans and Adele Evans,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 1999
Though traditional on the outside, with its stone steps, curving windows and witch-hat roof -- you won't find a single Queen Anne table or Laura Ashley duvet within.You will find a mafraj -- a traditional reception room in Yemen used primarily by men who sit on floor-level couches to relax.Large cherry-wood sliding doors open into rooms filled with Moroccan and Yemenite crockery, bridal chests, baskets and other ornaments.Intricate Victorian fireplaces are filled with Moroccan lamps and baskets.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1998
The number of U.S. households with home equity loans reached 9 million in 1997, according to a report released by the University of Michigan's Survey Research Center.The report, conducted from May to October 1997, found the percentage of homeowners with either a traditional home equity loan or a home equity line of credit was 13 percent, just two percentage points higher than the 11 percent of homeowners with home equity loans in 1988.But, with an increase in U.S. households and homeowners in the decade, the total number of home equity borrowers increased 38 percent, from 6.5 million in 1988 to 9 million in 1997.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1996
In just a few months, Coldspring New Town has been transformed from a neighborhood where architecture fans have found the most avant-garde homes in Baltimore. It's gone positively suburban.As the largest construction project of new houses in the city nears completion, the 103 vinyl-sided houses at the "Woodlands at Coldspring" are nearly sold out.The project's decidedly suburban name and conservative style of architecture are hardly what the creators of Coldspring envisioned 20 years ago when they designed a futuristic community of concrete, pueblolike houses in North Baltimore, west of the Jones Falls Expressway.
BUSINESS
By Beth Smith and Beth Smith,Special to The Sun | March 26, 1995
John and Judy Hasler's house would be perfectly at home in Colonial Williamsburg -- stained a traditional yellow with green shutters with a steeply pitched cedar roof and dormer windows.But the owners are quick to dispel the notion that the house is 18th-century perfect."This is definitely not a reproduction of a Williamsburg home, but its style is greatly influenced by the 18th-century homes of Tidewater Virginia," says Mrs. Hasler, 57. "We adapted it for the way we wanted to live."Working in close collaboration with Baltimore architect Wesley Burton, the Haslers helped create the ambience of a Colonial home while incorporating a floor plan that lends itself to a comfortable 1990s country lifestyle.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 16, 2000
Ruth Martin, a former nursing home worker, saw the need for alternative care for the elderly long before assisted-living homes began proliferating in Carroll County. "I felt there had to be some kind of alternative for people," said Martin, who began operating an assisted-living facility, Country Companions, about five years ago. "There were so many people in nursing homes that didn't require nursing care. This kind of care was somewhat unheard of." A decade ago, about 20 assisted-living facilities operated in the county, compared with 50 today.
BUSINESS
By Adele Evans and Adele Evans,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 1999
Though traditional on the outside, with its stone steps, curving windows and witch-hat roof -- you won't find a single Queen Anne table or Laura Ashley duvet within.You will find a mafraj -- a traditional reception room in Yemen used primarily by men who sit on floor-level couches to relax.Large cherry-wood sliding doors open into rooms filled with Moroccan and Yemenite crockery, bridal chests, baskets and other ornaments.Intricate Victorian fireplaces are filled with Moroccan lamps and baskets.
FEATURES
By Patricia Leigh Brown and Patricia Leigh Brown,New York Times News Service | May 25, 1993
I am looking at a 23-year-old shingled house by a pond in suburban Chicago, contemplating the meaning of zing. It is the presence of zing, "in all its colorful forms," Traditional Home magazine says, that makes this house such a joy to behold.You would not have found the word zing in HG, a magazine that long served as an urbane arbiter of taste (may it rest in peace). But throughout their history, home magazines have been a Rorschach test of American values. If the announcement of HG's closing and the rise of magazines like Traditional Home are any indication, Americans have grown weary of visual repartee.
BUSINESS
By ELLEN JAMES MARTIN | August 18, 1991
Are you exasperated with the chores your house requires, yet unwilling to move to a condo where you can't take the cocker spaniel or grow tomatoes without approval from a committee?Then you have a lot of company.People still want the prestige and freedom that accompanies the traditional single-family home and landscaped yard, housing experts say. Yet career and family schedules are making them increasingly unhappy with the upkeep imposed by such homes."When it comes to housing, this is the generation of ambivalence," says Dorcas Helfant, president-elect of the National Association of Realtors, based in Washington.
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