Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTrading Cards
IN THE NEWS

Trading Cards

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | June 22, 1995
Move over, Ken Griffey Jr. Watch out, Cal Ripken. Baltimore has a hot new contender in the trading card market with stats you can't begin to match -- Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke.In a slickly packaged campaign promotion, Mr. Schmoke's re-election committee is circulating trading cards that feature action shots of him and brag about his achievements as mayor.The 10 glossy cards, patterned after traditional baseball cards, show the mayor sweeping trash, reading to children, meeting with a police officer and walking down the steps of a new home with a hard hat in hand.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
Sports Digest | July 25, 2012
Et cetera Rare trading cards found on attic to be on display at Convention Center Approximately 700 trading cards from the 1910 era, many in pristine condition, found in an Ohio attic will be on public display for the first time when the 33rd annual National Sports Collectors Convention returns to the Baltimore Convention Center from next Wednesday to Aug. 5. In addition to the 800 exhibitors, 85 high-profile athletes will be signing autographs....
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,States News Service | May 9, 1994
Washington -- It's difficult to believe that a hard-hitting Baltimore Oriole has much in common with your two U.S. senators.But sure enough, all three appear on trading cards this spring.On the nation's playgrounds, a Cal Ripken or a Brady Anderson probably has a higher trading value than a Barbara Mikulski or a Paul Sarbanes. But not in political circles."Political cards are a sleeper in the industry," says Paul McGue, TC sales representative for Wild Card Inc., a Cincinnati trading card manufacturer.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN REPORTER | August 21, 2008
Michael Phelps' remarkable Beijing performance will certainly bring riches his way, but it is also putting money in the pockets of collectors who snapped up Phelps memorabilia before the Olympics. The hottest item is a 2004 Donruss trading card that portrays Phelps as a celebrity fan of the Ravens. The Texas company released 300 autographed versions of the card and about 5,000 "common" versions with no signature. Prices for the signed cards are approaching $1,000 on eBay, about double what they were before Phelps broke Mark Spitz's record with his eighth gold medal.
NEWS
By Kathryn Sosbe and Kathryn Sosbe,Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph | August 24, 1992
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -- Two Denver-area entrepreneurs are hoping to capitalize on two of America's fascinations -- true crime and trading cards -- by stocking convenience stores with packs of cards featuring missing children and fugitives.The owners believe the idea will pay off, largely because it appeals to an enduring human trait: greed.The hook? Observant cardholders could earn up to $2,000 for spotting missing children and the usual Crime Stoppers reward for supplying the lowdown on felony suspects.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 31, 1992
SANTA ROSA, Calif. -- Relatives of crime victims and their advocates are condemning a small company's decision to publish trading cards featuring serial killers and mass murderers.The trading cards, similar to those featuring baseball players, are to be released in May and will include the stories and color portraits of such convicted killers as Ted Bundy and Ramon Salcido, and accused mass murderer Jeffrey Dahmer.Bundy, who admitted killing 20 women, was executed Jan. 24, 1989 in Florida.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler | July 11, 1996
The best-known Olympics collectibles, over the years, have been pins.But trading cards are a part of the Centennial Games, too, focusing on history and the U.S. basketball teams.Upper Deck is the third major card manufacturer to offer Olympic cards this year, and it has two sets. The first, U.S. Olympic Champions Olympicards, features top American athletes of past Olympics and potential members of the 1996 teams (cards were printed before selections were made). It has 135 basic cards and four insert sets totaling 44 cards.
FEATURES
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | July 29, 1992
If anything can change the shallow popular bias that trading cards are strictly for champ-athlete subject matter and juvenile customers, it must be the new Mark Landman-James Vance card folio called "Republicans Attack!"Touted as "a paranoid fantasy" and relating a grimly amusing story in 36 illustrated cards, the boxed set arrives just in time to antagonize the key political parties at a moment when both can ill afford the distraction from election season. Perfect timing, in other words.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Staff Writer | September 18, 1992
So you give your kid a dollar to buy some trading cards -- Cal Ripken, maybe, or Kirby Puckett. And he comes back with . . . Paul Tsongas?There it is, though: "Tsongas on Issues," or Card No. 24 in the series "Decision '92," put out by AAA Sports Inc. of Cincinnati. On the back, we get this sound bite from the failed Democratic presidential candidate that was issued, presumably, in more hopeful times: "We need a President who recognizes that absent a viable manufacturing base, there is no U.S. economy."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1996
Watch out, Cal Ripken Jr. Step back, Brady Anderson. Take a rest, Eddie Murray.Competition is on the way. The Baltimore Police Department has issued trading cards -- mugs of their officers who want to become a different kind of hero for the city's youth.They aren't likely to be eyed by starry-eyed children with dreams of ball fields and hot dogs, but for hundreds of students at Edgewood Elementary School yesterday, the cards quickly became reason to smile."This is great," said a beaming Cierra Lewis, 7, a second-grade student showing off her new collection of Baltimore's Finest.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2003
If you know the term Yu-Gi-Oh!, it probably means one of three things: You have children, you are very hip or you were at Towson Town Center yesterday. The mall was swarmed by fanatics of Yu-Gi-Oh! - the latest Japanese trading-card game craze - which makes Pokemon seem as passe as Cabbage Patch Kids and Space Invaders. Baltimore is seventh on a 12-city tour marketing the game and its accessories. "I'm crazed and freaked out about it," said Zak Deickman, 13, of Bel Air, who has covered the walls of his bedroom with game posters.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2000
What's it take to be a teen-age heartthrob in the Baltimore-Washington area? If you play your cards right -- judging by the looks of the scores of young men who gathered yesterday at The Mall in Columbia for a photo shoot -- not much more than a killer smile and lots of gel in spiky, highlighted hair. That description fit about a third of the applicants who signed up at a crowded casting-call table, hoping to be considered good-looking and interesting enough to be selected as a "Boy Crazy!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | May 7, 2000
He has bright brown eyes, great skin and a sexy smile with just the slightest gap between his front teeth to show that he's imperfect and reachable -- a guy you could totally bump into at the mall. And maybe even date. The object that's set my heart -- and so many others -- aflutter has a name: Jed. Never mind that I don't really know him; his face is plastered on a trading card I can carry in my purse, stick on my mirror or tuck under my pillow at night. Jed, with his thick, rugged, oatmeal-heather wool sweater, has been on Pokemon-style trading cards sold to hormonal girls nationally and in far-off places like England, Germany and Australia.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 28, 1999
ONCE AGAIN WE ARE proud to present our annual Holiday Gift Guide -- the gift guide that has been helping holiday shoppers find just the right gift for the past 2,000 years.That is correct: This is the same gift guide that was consulted by the original Three Kings, who, following our recommendations, went to Bethlehem bearing gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh. These gifts were big hits, except for the frankincense and the myrrh, which turn out to be gum resins. This is not really what people are looking for in a gift.
FEATURES
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1999
ROCK HALL -- By most accounts, the trouble started when school opened.Some say the new kid in sixth grade was to blame, but others trace the origin to one of their own, a seventh-grader spotted with symptoms during the summer.Either way, 173 students at Rock Hall Middle School didn't stand a chance.You might think the Chesapeake would have kept the Pokemon craze on the busier side of the bay, but with a movie this week, with Christmas next month, with stuffed animals, Game Boys, Halloween costumes, children's jewelry, TV cartoons -- and now with Burger King in on the campaign -- no place is safe.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 10, 1999
"Pokemon" comes straight from the Short Attention Span school of the cinema. With its incomprehensible plot, flat visual style and indecipherably mixed messages (violence is good; no, wait, violence is bad!), this movie seems chiefly to be an excuse to sell even more trading cards, those elusive billets that have turned a generation of youngsters into thieves, mercenaries and compulsive gamblers.But when has cynical marketing ever kept throngs of kids from clamoring for anything? Rest assured, they will demand to see "Pokemon," which presents parents with a dilemma: forbid the little ones to see what amounts to a swollen version of what they can see every Saturday morning anyway?
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1996
TOKYO -- There are no high fives when Reiko Togashi gets together with her friends. No air kisses or handshakes. There is, instead, a small pause as each teen-ager rummages in her purse or pocket to pull out a neat box made especially for business cards.Each girl solemnly exchanges her own card for another's, closely examines the one she receives and carefully puts it away.In Japan, the exchange of business cards has long been the essential first step in seemingly every adult relationship other than love.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | March 7, 1999
CONCORD, N.H. -- The 48 bits of cardboard read like a Who's Who of American presidential politics: John F. Kennedy, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Richard M. Nixon, Colossus G. Benson.Yes, Colossus G. Benson. And Billy Joe Clegg, Georgiana Doerschuck and Arthur O. Blessitt, all people -- or at least primates -- with one-time presidential ambitions and now stars of New Hampshire Presidential Primary Trading Cards.First printed last year as a civics lesson for the state's fourth-graders, the trading cards have become keepsakes for political junkie types who mainline C-SPAN and know Edmund S. Muskie's middle name (it's Sixtus)
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1999
Maybe they learned it from their kids.Wall Street traders caught the Pokemon buzz yesterday, swapping shares of the Topps Co. Inc. with elementary-school vigor amid word that the company's sales in Pokemon products could be twice what was anticipated.After Topps released estimates that its Pokemon sales could reach $100 million this fiscal year, investors ran the price of Topps' shares up $2, or nearly 24 percent, to a closing price of $10.50 on the Nasdaq exchange.The only things missing were the tennis shoes and the binders.
NEWS
October 2, 1999
So it has come to this: Parents of five San Diego children are suing the makers of Pokemon on the grounds that collecting the trading cards is an illegal for of gambling. Are 'pocket monsters" on cards any different from ball players? Can a holographic Charzard card realy be worth more than Roger Clemans' rookie card? Parents, do you think this is harmful to youth (even leading to counterfeiting) or just another kids craze? Is there any educational value behind the Pokemon phenomenon, or is it another mass-merchandising distraction?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.