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By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | September 20, 1996
AS AUTUMN NEARS, here's some advice for short-term and long-pull investors:"Short-term, hang on. We forecast a bumpy 30-day ride on the 'Stock Market Express.' Hold tight and fear not the coming sharp swings in stock prices." (Russ Kaplan's Heartland Adviser.)"The bull market has three good months left, but October won't be one of them. Stocks will hit bottom Oct. 10-18. New highs lie ahead for November-December." (McClellan Report.)"More volatility lies ahead, underlining the importance of quality stock selection and taking less risk."
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | July 25, 2004
IF WALL STREET had its way, experts say, President Bush would achieve a feat his father couldn't: a second term. The Republican president is considered pro-business, favoring lower taxes and less regulation. Plus, Bush is the status quo, so there would presumably be fewer surprises for the next four years - and the stock market hates surprises. "Wall Street is convinced that Bush will be re-elected," says Jonathan Golub, an equity strategist at J.P. Morgan Fleming Asset Management in New York.
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BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | December 26, 1997
HOW SHOULD you invest your money in 1998? Today, more thoughts between the holidays:DON'T OVERLOOK STOCKS: "A $1 investment in large company stocks made on Dec. 1, 1925, increased by year-end 1996 over 1,000 times to $1,371, representing a compound annual return, including reinvested dividends, of 10.7 percent."That same $1 investment in government bonds grew to only $33.73 (5.1 percent) and Treasury bills to only $11.34 (3.7 percent). Inflation grew at only 3.1 percent annually." (Ibbotson Associates)
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | November 9, 2001
HOW DO YOU protect yourself in a rocky economy? The AARP Bulletin, November, suggests: "Cut down on unnecessary spending. It's just ascertaining the difference between a `need' and a `want.' Do you really `need' that latte every morning? "Pay off credit-card debt. With fees and interest rates on credit cards as high as 18 percent, there's no way you're going to get that back in the financial markets. "Don't panic sell or panic buy. The worst thing you can do is to make immediate changes out of fear.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 30, 1998
JANUARY on Wall Street is historically a strong month, tied with December for first place. Over 47 years, each month showed an average 1.7 percent gain, as measured by the S&P 500-stock index. Year-end bonuses, pension plan investments and cash gifts account for much of the advance."Based on whether the S&P 500 is up or down in January, most years followed suit in 42 out of 47 times -- an 89 percent batting average. And the 'January Barometer' scored 100 percent in odd years when new congresses convened."
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | June 30, 1999
ARE YOU waiting for a sharp market correction before you invest? Don't, according to financial adviser David Dreman. "Don't wait for a severe setback to find good `value stock' buys. Look for stocks with relatively low price-earnings ratios, above-average dividend yield and low price-to-book value ratios," he advises.WORKING LONGER? "Too many Americans feel retirement will be a breeze. Most baby boomers want to retire by age 60, haven't saved much, doubt they'll get many Social Security benefits -- but expect to live very well in retirement.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | May 3, 1994
Led by drug and cyclical issues, stocks scored a solid gain yesterday. The Dow Jones industrial average shrugged off early weakness and climbed 19.33 points to close at 3,701.02. All major stock indices moved into higher ground.CLOSEST NOW: Speaking of stocks, here are the names of the closest guessers in our Dow Jones forecasting contest as the first third of 1994 ends. With the Dow industrial average closing Friday, April 29, at 3,681.69, the nearest are John T. McDonough (3,684) and Ray Smith (3,671)
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | November 25, 1998
Why should you start investing early? "Albert Einstein called compound interest the greatest invention of mankind, and the younger you start, the better," says Investor's Business Daily. "If you start investing $4,000 annually (the maximum contribution for married couples) in a Roth IRA at age 30, you'll have $1.2 million by age 65, assuming a 10 percent return. If you wait till age 40, that nest egg shrinks to $436,727. And you can withdraw that money tax-free in retirement!"Want to buy Internet stocks without picking individual issues, many of which appear overpriced?
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | January 2, 1998
FOR THOSE those seeking professional guidance on handling their finances, how should they go about selecting a good investment adviser?Before looking, be sure you are emotionally suited for stocks. As James D. Hardesty warns, "As headlines trumpeted the Dow Jones surge over the past three years, many people lost sight of the fact that placing their money in stocks is one of the riskiest investments one can make."To find an adviser, ask family and friends who already use them. The Coyne & McClean newsletter says: "In selecting an adviser, investors should find out how many accounts he or she supervises (over 40 is too many)
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | April 2, 1992
On Dec. 9, 1965, the day Frank Robinson came to the Orioles from Cincinnati, the Dow Jones average closed at 949.55. Yesterday, a few days before "Play Ball!" at the new stadium, the Dow climbed nearly 14 points, to 3,249.33, a 242 percent gain in 26 years.MARKET WATCH: "Market will remain choppy and go nowhere for three weeks until we see first-quarter earnings." (Steven Kroll, investment adviser). . . . "Play this modest recovery with growth stocks like Coca-Cola, which will give consistently improving performance."
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | August 1, 2001
YOUR portfolio is designed with retirement in mind, but your holdings should be decided by how soon you expect to stop working. Money magazine suggests these asset allocations: When retirement is remote, or years away, 90 percent stocks, 10 percent cash and bonds; five years away, 60 percent stocks, 40 percent cash and bonds; in retirement: 60 percent cash and bonds, 40 percent stocks. Before jumping into the bond market, warns Eric Jacobson, fixed-income editor of Morningstar Inc., "Understand how bond funds work.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | February 18, 2000
ON TUESDAY, Ticker will mark its 23rd birthday. When this column began on Feb. 22, 1977, the Dow Jones average stood at 939.26, the NASDAQ index at 94.14. This morning the Dow stands at 10,514.57 and NASDAQ at 4,548.75 Adjusted for splits, here are Feb. 22, 1977, prices of some well-known stocks: Coca-Cola Co., $2.125; McDonald's Corp., $2.50; Merck & Co. Inc., $1.50; Procter & Gamble Co., $5.25; Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., $4.375. Explosive growth of retirement plans such as 401(k)s, 403(b)
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | January 5, 2000
ON DEC. 31, 1999, when the Dow Jones average closed at 11,497.12, Mrs. Kathy Karpers of Towson, a former schoolteacher, became our contest winner with her forecast of year-end DJ 11,500. Her prediction was made last February, when the Dow hovered around 9,300. Mrs. Karpers and her husband will be dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. Ticker at the winner's favorite restaurant, the Brass Elephant. Second place goes to Mark Banfield of Chester Spring, Pa., a financial planner who predicted DJ 11,490.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | June 30, 1999
ARE YOU waiting for a sharp market correction before you invest? Don't, according to financial adviser David Dreman. "Don't wait for a severe setback to find good `value stock' buys. Look for stocks with relatively low price-earnings ratios, above-average dividend yield and low price-to-book value ratios," he advises.WORKING LONGER? "Too many Americans feel retirement will be a breeze. Most baby boomers want to retire by age 60, haven't saved much, doubt they'll get many Social Security benefits -- but expect to live very well in retirement.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | March 31, 1999
WHAT LIES AHEAD for your money?"Over 48 years, April in Wall Street was up an average 1.3 percent. Only December, January, and November were bigger gainers." (1999 Stock Trader's Almanac.)"Follow money into `big-name' stocks," says financial adviser Laszlo Birinyi. "Over 30 percent of Big Board net buying is in the 30 Dow Jones stocks. This will continue until money exits these stocks. I don't expect that for several months.""Here are `year 2000' investment opportunities -- companies making things people will load up on at year-end," says adviser Robert Stovall: "Battery manufacturers, such as Gillette Co., and Rayovac Corp Canned goods: Campbell Soup Co. and H. J. Heinz Co Stores selling battery-operated radios, portable stoves, etc.: Home Depot Inc., Lowe's Cos. Inc. and Sears Roebuck and Co."
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 30, 1998
JANUARY on Wall Street is historically a strong month, tied with December for first place. Over 47 years, each month showed an average 1.7 percent gain, as measured by the S&P 500-stock index. Year-end bonuses, pension plan investments and cash gifts account for much of the advance."Based on whether the S&P 500 is up or down in January, most years followed suit in 42 out of 47 times -- an 89 percent batting average. And the 'January Barometer' scored 100 percent in odd years when new congresses convened."
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | February 18, 2000
ON TUESDAY, Ticker will mark its 23rd birthday. When this column began on Feb. 22, 1977, the Dow Jones average stood at 939.26, the NASDAQ index at 94.14. This morning the Dow stands at 10,514.57 and NASDAQ at 4,548.75 Adjusted for splits, here are Feb. 22, 1977, prices of some well-known stocks: Coca-Cola Co., $2.125; McDonald's Corp., $2.50; Merck & Co. Inc., $1.50; Procter & Gamble Co., $5.25; Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., $4.375. Explosive growth of retirement plans such as 401(k)s, 403(b)
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | July 30, 1992
Adding 45 points to Tuesday's 52 point surge, the Dow Jones average closed yesterday at 3,379.19.With election nearing, I checked back and found that on the day Ronald Reagan was elected (Nov. 11, 1980), the Dow stood at 932.42, and on the day George Bush won the election (Nov. 8, 1988), the DJ closed at 2,130.87. The Dow indicator has vaulted 2,446 points, or 262 percent, since Reagan's election.THE GOOD NEWS: "On the whole the stock market now looks more attractive than it has since December."
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | November 25, 1998
Why should you start investing early? "Albert Einstein called compound interest the greatest invention of mankind, and the younger you start, the better," says Investor's Business Daily. "If you start investing $4,000 annually (the maximum contribution for married couples) in a Roth IRA at age 30, you'll have $1.2 million by age 65, assuming a 10 percent return. If you wait till age 40, that nest egg shrinks to $436,727. And you can withdraw that money tax-free in retirement!"Want to buy Internet stocks without picking individual issues, many of which appear overpriced?
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | July 31, 1998
NOTES AND QUOTES about your money:CASH IS KING: "In this high market, never forget cash. It carries no risk, is plenty liquid and pays a solid, inflation-adjusted return." (Wall Street Companion.)LOOKING FOR GROWTH? "Invest in proven winners -- companies that showed strong, rising earnings and dividends for 10 years. They consistently outperform the market. Examples: AMP Inc., Luby's Cafeterias Inc. and Washington REIT." (Bill Staton, financial planner.)WANT INCOME? "Attractive Stocks With Rising Dividend Records," according to S&P Outlook: Albertson's Inc., Avery Dennison Corp.
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