Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTrademark Law
IN THE NEWS

Trademark Law

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By NEWSDAY | October 14, 1997
A catchy song came from Richard Conway's radio. "If you wannabe my lover, you gotta get with my friends," sang the Spice Girls, as their first single "Wannabe" crashed into the British pop charts last year.Conway sensed the groundswell around the band, which would go on to make tens of millions of dollars over the next year. So Conway went to the Internet, did a search for http: //www. spicegirls.com and found it was unregistered. And so, like the domain-name pioneers and homesteaders of years gone by, Conway snapped up spicegirls.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2010
Denise Whiting has not only built her life around the fabled Balmer Hon, opening Cafe Hon and founding the city's annual Honfest — she's helped to make the three-letter term of endearment a household word around town. Now she owns it. Whiting has officially trademarked the word "Hon. " Over the years, she has trademarked almost every play on the word she could think of. Like the words " Cafe Hon " and "Honfest" and "Hon Bar" and "Hontown," the name of her newest Hampden shop.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 23, 2000
WASHINGTON -- In a clear victory for discount superstores, the Supreme Court cut back sharply yesterday on trademark protection for consumer product designs that are copied by cheaper knockoffs. A product design, the court ruled unanimously, is eligible for trademark protection only if it in some way indicates the source -- that is, the company that makes and sells it. The design itself cannot qualify. The ruling came under a federal law, the Lanham Act, that prohibits a word, name or symbol on a product from being copied if the copying would cause consumers to be confused about who made the item.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 23, 2000
WASHINGTON -- In a clear victory for discount superstores, the Supreme Court cut back sharply yesterday on trademark protection for consumer product designs that are copied by cheaper knockoffs. A product design, the court ruled unanimously, is eligible for trademark protection only if it in some way indicates the source -- that is, the company that makes and sells it. The design itself cannot qualify. The ruling came under a federal law, the Lanham Act, that prohibits a word, name or symbol on a product from being copied if the copying would cause consumers to be confused about who made the item.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | August 16, 1991
If Roy G. Becker has guessed the pitch correctly, he may end up profiting from the name of the Orioles' new stadium.Becker, of Arnold, has already printed and sold T-shirts with the name Camden Yards -- the moniker many people think will end up on the new ballpark being built downtown. More important, he was the first to apply for the trademark to sell clothing with that name when he filed July 1 with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and paid his $175 application fee.That will not prevent the Maryland Stadium Authority and Orioles Inc. from naming the new ballpark Camden Yards, but it may give the Orioles headaches if they put the name on T-shirts, hats or other clothing.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1998
What's in a name?The demise of a small business, if it's not protected.That has become the story of Gary Richard Shank, the former owner of a 27-year-old fishing, hunting and sporting goods shop in Essex. He has gone out of business, snuffed out by a 72-store chain that began opening stores in Maryland three years ago, he said.His undoing began at their introduction: Dick's Clothing and Sporting Goods Inc., meet Dick's Sporting Goods Inc.The latter is Shank's store started by his father, Richard.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2010
Denise Whiting has not only built her life around the fabled Balmer Hon, opening Cafe Hon and founding the city's annual Honfest — she's helped to make the three-letter term of endearment a household word around town. Now she owns it. Whiting has officially trademarked the word "Hon. " Over the years, she has trademarked almost every play on the word she could think of. Like the words " Cafe Hon " and "Honfest" and "Hon Bar" and "Hontown," the name of her newest Hampden shop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2011
After almost a year of simmering controversy, Cafe Hon owner Denise Whiting said Monday that she will relinquish her "Hon" trademark. "I'll take it off the register," she said. "It was never mine to have in the first place. " Her trademark announcement, which she made on a morning radio program with reality TV chef Gordon Ramsay, was wrapped in an apology. "I am sorry for the animosity and the hatred and everything that trademarking a word has done," Whiting said. "Trademarking the word has not only almost killed me but has just about killed the business.
NEWS
June 14, 2011
I greatly enjoyed the informative letter about "hon" and trademark law by Robert Borotkanics. However Mr. Borotkanics evidently hasn't been in Baltimore long enough or moved in wide enough circles, as he is under the false impression that the use of the word is purely feminine, handed down, as he said, from mother to daughter. To the contrary, one of the most wonderful aspects of "hon" is that it is not gender-specific. Truck drivers and construction workers (of either sex) as well as office workers and store clerks, use the word casually and kindly, and people who came from somewhere else know beyond question they have become Baltimoreans when they find themselves saying it. Granted not everybody says hon, anybody can. Katharine W. Rylaarsdam, Baltimore
FEATURES
November 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Designing a "Class of 2000" T-shirt for your local school? You might want to call a trademark lawyer: Someone already owns the rights.Thousands of budding entrepreneurs are seeking registered trademarks for "Millennium" and "Year 2000" -- and every conceivable derivative -- for a range of products, reports the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. It has awarded 117 trademarks that include the word "millennium," more than 1,500 containing "2000." Thousands more are pending.Move your furniture with "Moving into the Millennium."
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1998
What's in a name?The demise of a small business, if it's not protected.That has become the story of Gary Richard Shank, the former owner of a 27-year-old fishing, hunting and sporting goods shop in Essex. He has gone out of business, snuffed out by a 72-store chain that began opening stores in Maryland three years ago, he said.His undoing began at their introduction: Dick's Clothing and Sporting Goods Inc., meet Dick's Sporting Goods Inc.The latter is Shank's store started by his father, Richard.
FEATURES
By NEWSDAY | October 14, 1997
A catchy song came from Richard Conway's radio. "If you wannabe my lover, you gotta get with my friends," sang the Spice Girls, as their first single "Wannabe" crashed into the British pop charts last year.Conway sensed the groundswell around the band, which would go on to make tens of millions of dollars over the next year. So Conway went to the Internet, did a search for http: //www. spicegirls.com and found it was unregistered. And so, like the domain-name pioneers and homesteaders of years gone by, Conway snapped up spicegirls.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | August 16, 1991
If Roy G. Becker has guessed the pitch correctly, he may end up profiting from the name of the Orioles' new stadium.Becker, of Arnold, has already printed and sold T-shirts with the name Camden Yards -- the moniker many people think will end up on the new ballpark being built downtown. More important, he was the first to apply for the trademark to sell clothing with that name when he filed July 1 with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and paid his $175 application fee.That will not prevent the Maryland Stadium Authority and Orioles Inc. from naming the new ballpark Camden Yards, but it may give the Orioles headaches if they put the name on T-shirts, hats or other clothing.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2010
It's cop against cop in a standoff over the use of a police badge in a race for the Baltimore County Council. Baltimore County Police Chief James Johnson has sent a cease-and-desist letter to council candidate Charles "Buzz" Beeler of Dundalk over the retired officer's use of a police badge in campaign literature. The chief threatened legal action in the Aug. 11 letter to Beeler, a veteran of the county force for more than 30 years, if he did not immediately stop using the badge and retrieve any fliers or mailers with the symbol.
NEWS
By Denise Whiting | December 19, 2010
Welcome to my office. Once a supply closet, it's crammed with tools, merchandise and paraphernalia left over from this summer's HonFest. I've about five cubic feet of space for me, my desk and the finicky computer that helps me run this little gift shop I've opened, HONtown. The shop and Café Hon across the street employ 54 good souls. They're working hard through the holiday rush, though our morale took quite a hit from all the frustration vented last week, on these pages and elsewhere, about our trademarks.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.