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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
The Seacrets branding crusade continues. After winning a similar case last November, Ocean City's Seacrets has filed another trademark infringement lawsuit, this time against Baltimore restaurant Caribbean Secrets. Seacrets - which this Baltimore Sun story describes as "more of a theme park" than a bar because of its multiple entities - has asked the restaurant to change its name several times, but the request has been "adamantly" denied, according to Sam Littlepage, lead counsel for Seacrets.
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | February 11, 2014
Under Armour and Nike Inc. have agreed to settle a trademark infringement lawsuit in which the Baltimore-based sports apparel brand accused its rival of illegally using versions of the "I Will" slogan. "The litigation has been resolved on a confidential and mutually agreeable basis," Under Armour said in a statement Tuesday. UPDATE: Nike spokeswoman Mary Remuzzi issued the same statement and said the company had no further comment. An order approved Monday by Judge Ellen L. Hollander in U.S. District Court in Baltimore dismisses the Feb. 21 complaint.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
California footwear maker Gravity Defyer Corp. accused Baltimore-based Under Armour of trademark infringement in a lawsuit filed Monday in federal court. The maker of shock-absorbing athletic, casual and dress shoes says in the lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court that Under Armour intentionally created a product with a name that sounds like its G Defy trademark. The lawsuit seeks to prevent further infringement. Under Armour representatives could not be immediately reached Monday afternoon.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
Back in 2000, Entrepreneur's StartUps magazine featured an article about Janice McLean Deloatch as she was trying to launch a business in Maryland that dispensed pantyhose from vending machines. The venture didn't take off. But the Abingdon resident took what she learned from the experience to create "The Entrepreneurs Edge," a monthly public access cable TV program dispensing advice for entrepreneurs and small businesses. A dozen years after that favorable article, though, the magazine's parent sued McLean Deloatch for using the word "entrepreneur" in the show's title.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
Baltimore-based Under Armour Inc. is accusing Beverly Hills sports drink maker Body Armor Nutrition LLC of trademark infringement for using a brand name and logo that confuses consumers, according to a lawsuit filed in federal court. The sports apparel maker filed the case in U.S. District Court in Baltimore on April 26, seeking an injunction banning the California company from using the name Body Armor, a logo that resembles Under Armour's interlocking U and A, or the tagline Protect + Restore, which Under Armour says is similar to its tagline, Protect This House.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
Midnight Sun alum Sam Sessa and I were both unfamiliar with Caribbean Secrets, the defendant in the trademark infringement lawsuit filed by Ocean City's Seacrets. So Sam drove by the restaurant on South Hanover Street earlier this week and snapped the above photo. I'm going to present this without much comment, but will point out Seacrets' lawsuit states: "The continued use of the CARIBBEAN SECRETS mark by Defendant in connection with its restaurant is likely to cause confusion or mistake as to the source or origin of those services, thereby misleading and/or deceiving consumers in the State of Maryland and elsewhere.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1994
TI loses case in JapanIn a blow to Texas Instruments Inc., a court in Japan ruled yesterday morning that Fujitsu Ltd., Japan's largest computer company, was not infringing the U.S. company's patent covering the basic invention of the integrated circuit.During the last few years, Texas Instruments, based in Dallas, has earned hundreds of millions of dollars a year by aggressively seeking royalty payments from other companies.Texas Instruments' stock fell $4.625 yesterday in Nasdaq trading, to $77.875.
NEWS
By Chris Korman and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Under Armour is suing Nike, alleging that its chief competitor is illegally using a version of the Baltimore sports apparel company's new primary slogan, "I Will. " The suit, which the company said it filed Thursday afternoon in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, seeks to force Nike to stop using any form of that phrase and asks for unspecified punitive damages for trademark infringement and unfair competition. According to a copy of the suit provided by Under Armour, the complaint shows several instances of ads Nike placed on social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter beginning late last year using slogans that all begin with "I will.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
Back in 2000, Entrepreneur's StartUps magazine featured an article about Janice McLean Deloatch as she was trying to launch a business in Maryland that dispensed pantyhose from vending machines. The venture didn't take off. But the Abingdon resident took what she learned from the experience to create "The Entrepreneurs Edge," a monthly public access cable TV program dispensing advice for entrepreneurs and small businesses. A dozen years after that favorable article, though, the magazine's parent sued McLean Deloatch for using the word "entrepreneur" in the show's title.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | February 11, 2014
Under Armour and Nike Inc. have agreed to settle a trademark infringement lawsuit in which the Baltimore-based sports apparel brand accused its rival of illegally using versions of the "I Will" slogan. "The litigation has been resolved on a confidential and mutually agreeable basis," Under Armour said in a statement Tuesday. UPDATE: Nike spokeswoman Mary Remuzzi issued the same statement and said the company had no further comment. An order approved Monday by Judge Ellen L. Hollander in U.S. District Court in Baltimore dismisses the Feb. 21 complaint.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
California footwear maker Gravity Defyer Corp. accused Baltimore-based Under Armour of trademark infringement in a lawsuit filed Monday in federal court. The maker of shock-absorbing athletic, casual and dress shoes says in the lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court that Under Armour intentionally created a product with a name that sounds like its G Defy trademark. The lawsuit seeks to prevent further infringement. Under Armour representatives could not be immediately reached Monday afternoon.
NEWS
By Chris Korman and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Under Armour is suing Nike, alleging that its chief competitor is illegally using a version of the Baltimore sports apparel company's new primary slogan, "I Will. " The suit, which the company said it filed Thursday afternoon in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, seeks to force Nike to stop using any form of that phrase and asks for unspecified punitive damages for trademark infringement and unfair competition. According to a copy of the suit provided by Under Armour, the complaint shows several instances of ads Nike placed on social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter beginning late last year using slogans that all begin with "I will.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
Midnight Sun alum Sam Sessa and I were both unfamiliar with Caribbean Secrets, the defendant in the trademark infringement lawsuit filed by Ocean City's Seacrets. So Sam drove by the restaurant on South Hanover Street earlier this week and snapped the above photo. I'm going to present this without much comment, but will point out Seacrets' lawsuit states: "The continued use of the CARIBBEAN SECRETS mark by Defendant in connection with its restaurant is likely to cause confusion or mistake as to the source or origin of those services, thereby misleading and/or deceiving consumers in the State of Maryland and elsewhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
The Seacrets branding crusade continues. After winning a similar case last November, Ocean City's Seacrets has filed another trademark infringement lawsuit, this time against Baltimore restaurant Caribbean Secrets. Seacrets - which this Baltimore Sun story describes as "more of a theme park" than a bar because of its multiple entities - has asked the restaurant to change its name several times, but the request has been "adamantly" denied, according to Sam Littlepage, lead counsel for Seacrets.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
Baltimore-based Under Armour Inc. is accusing Beverly Hills sports drink maker Body Armor Nutrition LLC of trademark infringement for using a brand name and logo that confuses consumers, according to a lawsuit filed in federal court. The sports apparel maker filed the case in U.S. District Court in Baltimore on April 26, seeking an injunction banning the California company from using the name Body Armor, a logo that resembles Under Armour's interlocking U and A, or the tagline Protect + Restore, which Under Armour says is similar to its tagline, Protect This House.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1994
TI loses case in JapanIn a blow to Texas Instruments Inc., a court in Japan ruled yesterday morning that Fujitsu Ltd., Japan's largest computer company, was not infringing the U.S. company's patent covering the basic invention of the integrated circuit.During the last few years, Texas Instruments, based in Dallas, has earned hundreds of millions of dollars a year by aggressively seeking royalty payments from other companies.Texas Instruments' stock fell $4.625 yesterday in Nasdaq trading, to $77.875.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Staff Writer | August 26, 1993
The Annapolis Business Journal, a free monthly tabloid geared toward the local business community, will premier next month.But the debut may not be free of glitches.The Baltimore Business Journal, which is not affiliated with the Annapolis effort or two similarly named papers in Howard County, filed suit Friday in U.S District Court, claiming an infringement of trademark.The suit claims the words "Business Journal" belong to the Baltimore trade weekly.Robert W. Burdon, president and publisher of the Baltimore Business Journal, said he could not comment.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Staff Writer | August 26, 1993
The Annapolis Business Journal, a free monthly tabloid geared toward the local business community, will premier next month.But the debut may not be free of glitches.The Baltimore Business Journal, which is not affiliated with the Annapolis effort or two similarly named papers in Howard County, filed suit Friday in U.S District Court, claiming an infringement of trademark.The suit claims the words "Business Journal" belong to the Baltimore trade weekly.Robert W. Burdon, president and publisher of the Baltimore Business Journal, said he could not comment.
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