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Trade With Mexico

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NEWS
September 17, 1990
The train leading to a United States-Mexico free trade agreement has left the station and is heading down a fast track for approval before mid-decade. Now that Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari has formally asked for negotiations, President Bush is in a position to request Congress' approval. He is expected to do so this week under a 90-day yes-or-no rule that should get officials to the bargaining table by next Spring.Despite presidential enthusiasm on both sides of the Rio Grande, the negotiations will be contentious and controversial.
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NEWS
By Kenneth H. MacKay Jr | December 27, 2000
WASHINGTON -- During the election frenzy, there were claims bandied about that the current administration allowed its relationship with the other countries in this hemisphere to lapse. The record shows, however, that despite serious challenges we still face, the Clinton-Gore administration ushered in a new relationship with the Americas, one based on cooperation and partnership and aimed at strengthening democratic and open market societies. What did we do? We worked with Congress to pass the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)
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NEWS
By TRB | March 14, 1991
Opponents of a free-trade zone with Mexico, as proposed by the Bush administration, cannot make the usual protectionist complaint about the ''absence of a level playing field.'' The whole idea of a free-trade zone is to level trade barriers on both sides to zero.Nor can poor Mexico, with one-tenth our per-capita income, be vilified like Japan, as a monster out to suck our economic life's blood. Instead, the argument is nearly the opposite: Mexico is too primitive and impoverished, with third-world wages and environmental standards.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration conceded yesterday that the controversial North American Free Trade Agreement has produced only "modest" benefits for the United States so far, but rejected claims by critics that the pact is hurting U.S. wages and jobs.In a 140-page report to Congress, the White House argues that NAFTA has caused increases in U.S. exports to Mexico, along with higher income, investment and jobs on both sides of the border as Mexico carries out its promises to reduce barriers to investment and trade.
NEWS
By Michael Wilson | May 1, 1991
MORE IS at stake over a U.S.-Mexico free trade agreement than expanding American investment opportunities or keeping Mexican workers from slipping across the border.If Congress fails to extend "fast-track" authority next month to the Bush administration to negotiate an agreement, the trade talks will collapse. And so will the improving U.S.-Mexican relationship, so vital to Mexico's economic growth and America's influence in the hemisphere.Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari has an enormous investment in extension of a fast track, which provides for a simple up-or-down, no-amendment vote in Congress on any international trade agreements signed by the president.
BUSINESS
By Chicago Tribune | March 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration, already pushing a slew of tax increases to finance its domestic agenda, is also considering a tax for an international concern: a levy on U.S.-Mexican commerce to pay for anticipated fallout from the North American Free Trade Agreement.Though discussions are at an early stage, senior administration officials say, a tax on cross-border trade is among the options being evaluated to underwrite environmental cleanup in Mexico and worker retraining in the United States.
BUSINESS
By Clyde H. Farnsworth LTC and Clyde H. Farnsworth LTC,New York Times News Service | May 1, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration, facing a critical vote in Congress next month over its authority to negotiate with other countries on trade, will make significant environmental and job-security commitments to accompany a trade pact with Mexico, administration and congressional aides said yesterday.The commitments are intended to sway votes in a battle that has pitted the administration and proponents of free trade against organized labor, textile interests and others who fear that loosened restrictions on trade with Mexico will result in the loss of jobs and a weakening of environmental and labor standards.
NEWS
By Greg Mastel | May 16, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The North American Free Trade Agreement is the most analyzed and propagandized trade agreement in history. Unfortunately, these analyses have more to do with election-year politics than sound economics.Most of the assessments focus on the treaty's effect on jobs. It is difficult, however, to isolate the effects of NAFTA from the larger economic forces that affect U.S. employment and trade with Mexico and Canada. The normal churning of the economy results in the destruction and creation of millions of jobs each year.
NEWS
By GREG MASTEL | May 5, 1996
THE NORTH AMERICAN Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is the most analyzed and propagandized trade agreement in history. Unfortunately, all of these analyses have more to do with election-year politics than sound economics.Not surprisingly, most of the assessments focus on NAFTA's effect on jobs. It is difficult, however, to isolate the effects of NAFTA from the larger economic forces that affect U.S. employment and trade with Mexico and Canada. The normal churning of the economy results in the destruction and creation of millions of jobs each year.
NEWS
By The Los Angeles Times | May 21, 1991
A DAY of reckoning is fast approaching for President Bush's proposed free trade agreement with Mexico. Congress is scheduled to vote this week on whether to give the president a free hand in negotiating a Mexican trade pact. That pact would be the centerpiece of a North American free trade system that would also include Canada and that could, by the next century, embrace the entire Western Hemisphere.The countdown to the congressional vote has locked Washington policy-makers in a contentious debate, but momentum seems to be building in support of the president.
NEWS
By Greg Mastel | May 16, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The North American Free Trade Agreement is the most analyzed and propagandized trade agreement in history. Unfortunately, these analyses have more to do with election-year politics than sound economics.Most of the assessments focus on the treaty's effect on jobs. It is difficult, however, to isolate the effects of NAFTA from the larger economic forces that affect U.S. employment and trade with Mexico and Canada. The normal churning of the economy results in the destruction and creation of millions of jobs each year.
NEWS
By GREG MASTEL | May 5, 1996
THE NORTH AMERICAN Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is the most analyzed and propagandized trade agreement in history. Unfortunately, all of these analyses have more to do with election-year politics than sound economics.Not surprisingly, most of the assessments focus on NAFTA's effect on jobs. It is difficult, however, to isolate the effects of NAFTA from the larger economic forces that affect U.S. employment and trade with Mexico and Canada. The normal churning of the economy results in the destruction and creation of millions of jobs each year.
NEWS
By CARL M. CANNON and CARL M. CANNON,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Two years ago, an alliance that included President Clinton, three former presidents and the business community predicted that if Congress passed the North American Free Trade Agreement, the jobs created in the United States would be better, higher paying and more numerous than the jobs lost.Today, however, trade statistics paint a picture that is nearly the opposite of what Mr. Clinton or any NAFTA's champions had envisioned.Before passage of the treaty -- and before the collapse of the Mexican peso a year later -- the United States had a trade surplus with Mexico.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | January 31, 1995
WASHINGTON -- On the face of it, President Clinton should be in a strong position to make his case for the $40 billion loan guarantee for Mexico.He was, after all, highly successful in building a bipartisan majority for both the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in 1993 and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) last year.But that was then and this is now. The problem the president faces in dealing with the financial crisis in Mexico speaks volumes about how much credibility he lost when his party went down to a crushing defeat Nov. 8 and he was assigned so much of the blame.
BUSINESS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | September 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Peter A. Bowe expects his business to grow in coming years, but Michael Clifford fears he'll be out of a job -- contrasting prospects triggered by the North American Free Trade Agreement.As in the rest of the nation, there will be winners and losers in Maryland if Congress this year approves the treaty to create the world's largest free-trade zone. NAFTA -- the focus of a Clinton administration lobbying push this week -- would link the United States, Canada and Mexico in a common market of 360 million consumers with a shared annual output of $6.5 trillion.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | August 28, 1993
The agriculture secretaries of Maryland, Delaware and Virginia jointly announced their support for the North American Free Trade Agreement yesterday, saying the potential for an expanded Mexican market was good news for the farmers of the region."
NEWS
August 26, 1993
When Congress returns from its summer break, the hottest item on its agenda will be the pending North American Free Trade Agreement with Mexico and Canada. The White House waited until lawmakers were away from Washington before concluding side accords fulfilling President Clinton's campaign pledge to add environmental and labor standards safeguards to the agreement.Now Mr. Clinton has the task of containing a rebellion in his own Democratic Party, one that has already seen the defection of House Majority Leader Richard Gephardt.
NEWS
August 26, 1993
When Congress returns from its summer break, the hottest item on its agenda will be the pending North American Free Trade Agreement with Mexico and Canada. The White House waited until lawmakers were away from Washington before concluding side accords fulfilling President Clinton's campaign pledge to add environmental and labor standards safeguards to the agreement.Now Mr. Clinton has the task of containing a rebellion in his own Democratic Party, one that has already seen the defection of House Majority Leader Richard Gephardt.
BUSINESS
By Journal of Commerce | April 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration scramble yesterday to counter the impression that the North American free-trade agreement is headed for defeat.The reaction was forced by the widely publicized comments of Leon E. Panetta, President Clinton's budget director, who said Monday that there was not enough support in Congress to pass the agreement and that it was "dead" for now.Aides to the president and his allies on Capitol Hill mobilized yesterday to insist that the trade pact is alive and well and will pass after related agreements on environmental and labor standards are completed in June.
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