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By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | July 25, 1991
BEIJING -- Chinese officials blew hot and cold yesterday in response to the U.S. Senate's move to attach stringent conditions to the renewal next year of China's most-favored-nation trading status with the United States.China's state-controlled TV news last night briefly mentioned the Senate's action on Tuesday, reiterating the Foreign Ministry's long-held stance that attaching such conditions represented unacceptable interference in Chinese internal affairs.But earlier in the day, a foreign trade official expressed gratitude to President Bush in the expectation that he would carry out his promise to veto any MFN conditions in favor of unconditionally extending the trade status and that the veto would withstand any attempt at a congressional override.
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SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO and ROCH KUBATKO,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2000
BOSTON - Somehow, in the middle of all the trade speculation and confusion over his service time, Scott Erickson found a few hours last night to pitch for the Orioles. He was better off dealing with the speculation and confusion. The game proved far more unsettling. Looking for his first win in more than two weeks, Erickson allowed two long home runs in one of his shorter outings, and the Orioles didn't stir until the game had extended beyond their reach in a 12-4 loss before 33,612 at Fenway Park.
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NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | March 15, 1994
BEIJING -- The tough talk during Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher's rocky human rights mission here clouded the emergence of a rough outline for resolving this year's struggle over renewal of China's favorable trade status with the United States.The solution would not be very pretty. It would not thrill many of China's human rights critics.But the modest Chinese steps on human rights announced yesterday as Mr. Christopher left Beijing could be interpreted as having moved China a lot closer under the specific language of last year's presidential order.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jay Hancock and Jonathan Weisman and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 20, 2000
WASHINGTON - The European Union reached a market-opening trade accord with China yesterday, clearing the last major hurdle impeding China's accession to the World Trade Organization and adding a powerful argument to President Clinton's efforts to normalize trade with the Communist giant. The European deal came at a critical time for the administration: A vote in the House to permanently normalize trade relations with China is scheduled for Wednesday. With Senate passage virtually assured, the real battle is in the House.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | May 26, 1993
BEIJING -- China paroled a veteran political dissident today in a move that follows reports that President Clinton will extend China's favorable U.S. trade status for one more year without special conditions.Xu Wenli, 49, who has served 12 years in prison for taking part in a democracy movement here in 1978-81, was released three years early today, the Justice Ministry announced.John Kamm, a U.S. human rights activist in Hong Kong, said that he earlier received a fax from "a senior government source" promising that Mr. Xu would be released this morning.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton said yesterday that despite China's failure to improve its human rights record, he will push, as he has each year, for extending Beijing's favorable trade status with the United States.The president's announcement immediately drew criticism from human rights activists and from some liberals and conservatives in Congress, which must approve the extension of most favored nation (MFN) trade status.Clinton and his top foreign policy officials acknowledged yesterday that China has not responded to open trade and dialogue with the West as they had hoped.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 12, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The draft of a report by the State Department on human rights has concluded that China has not made significant progress in curbing widespread abuses last year, which President Clinton has said is necessary for China to win extension of preferential trade benefits next summer, according to senior administration officials.The officials said yesterday the report's findings underscore the repeated warnings by Mr. Clinton and Secretary of State Warren Christopher that unless the Chinese move forward urgently on human rights, they will lose the right to export their goods to the United States under the same low tariffs enjoyed by most other countries.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | May 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In a delicate balancing act, President Clinton is trying to craft conditions on trade with China that are tough enough to satisfy expectations but not so harsh as to wreck U.S.-Chinese relations.Mr. Clinton is expected to issue an executive order this week extending China's favorable trade status but tying future extensions to improved behavior, especially in the realm of human rights.The fine print will be read worldwide. And the political stakes embedded there will be high.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 21, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Chinese dissidents, human rights activists and Christian conservatives will travel to Capitol Hill today to denounce U.S. policies in China, just as they did last month before President Clinton's trip to that country.But this time, the opponents will be lambasting the same Republican leaders they stood shoulder to shoulder with in June, the same leaders who for months have assailed Clinton's China policies but who tomorrow will push to uphold China's most favored nation trade status.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | May 17, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The White House, already under fire for proposing to renew China's favorable trade status despite meager human rights reforms, is considering renewing arms sales to win influence with Chinese leaders, a senior administration official says.The idea of renewing the sales, which were cut off after the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989, is bound to be controversial, especially since the Bush administration has criticized Beijing for selling weapons to countries such as Pakistan.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 18, 2000
WASHINGTON - President Clinton's campaign to open up China's huge market to U.S. goods gained a big boost yesterday, when two key committees gave overwhelming approval to legislation that would normalize trade relations with Beijing. In the House, several wavering Democrats threw their crucial support behind the measure after Republican leaders agreed to provisions that would require close monitoring of Beijing's human rights record and protect U.S. markets against surges of Chinese goods.
NEWS
May 17, 2000
China hasn't earned `permanent normal' trade status ... I'd like to comment on two recent articles regarding Permanent Normal Trade Relations (PNTR) status for China. Reading about the ex-presidents backing Clinton on this policy (" `Elder statesmen' join Clinton in support of China trade bill," May 10), I couldn't help thinking: Here are Gerald (never elected) Ford and Jimmy (failed presidency) Carter acting like they have a stake in this thing. I don't believe that they have to worry about their jobs being moved to China.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 21, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Chinese dissidents, human rights activists and Christian conservatives will travel to Capitol Hill today to denounce U.S. policies in China, just as they did last month before President Clinton's trip to that country.But this time, the opponents will be lambasting the same Republican leaders they stood shoulder to shoulder with in June, the same leaders who for months have assailed Clinton's China policies but who tomorrow will push to uphold China's most favored nation trade status.
NEWS
June 7, 1998
IT WOULD have been easier politically for President Clinton to shun China, which he will visit later this month, and to deny it most favored nation status, which means normal trade relations. Neither China nor Mr. Clinton is popular in Congress this year.But China is home to more than 1 billion people. It is one of five long-standing nuclear powers that are also permanent members of the United Nations Security Council, and the one chairing the Geneva meeting of those powers' foreign ministers to devise ways to halt the arms race between nuclear newcomers India and Pakistan.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton said yesterday that despite China's failure to improve its human rights record, he will push, as he has each year, for extending Beijing's favorable trade status with the United States.The president's announcement immediately drew criticism from human rights activists and from some liberals and conservatives in Congress, which must approve the extension of most favored nation (MFN) trade status.Clinton and his top foreign policy officials acknowledged yesterday that China has not responded to open trade and dialogue with the West as they had hoped.
FEATURES
By Elinor J. Brecher and Elinor J. Brecher,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 18, 1996
MIAMI -- Before someone figured out you could toss it into the washer on "delicate," and before the Chinese began cranking it out as $10 T-shirts, silk reigned as the fabric of royalty and the royalty of fabrics. Mystery and grandeur whispered in the sensual sibilance of its name.But in the 15 years since the United States granted China "most favored nation" trading status, silk has become as common -- in every sense of the word -- as synthetics. It owes its popularity as much to China's cheap labor as to Americans' renewed appreciation for natural fibers.
NEWS
May 17, 1991
President Bush is willing to risk a fight with Congress over human rights to retain most favored nation status for China, a designation worth billions of dollars in foreign trade. The president, who represented the United States in Beijing as the countries began to resume diplomatic relations and considers himself an expert on China, cites "big picture" concerns -- the strategic importance of this huge country as well as its cooperation in the U.N. Security Council during the Persian Gulf crisis.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | October 20, 1991
BEIJING -- In a quiet but significant concession to U.S. pressure, China has allowed the wives of five leading Chinese dissidents to join their husbands in exile in the United States.A visiting French human rights group said yesterday that Chinese officials are considering permitting more relatives of exiled pro-democracy protesters to emigrate.But the visiting French lawyers and judges also said that authorities here still reject Western requests that amnesty be granted to those involved in China's 1989 democracy movement.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, unable to punish China without seriously damaging U.S. interests, is likely to renew favorable trade status for Beijing even though it has failed to make significant human rights progress, administration officials said yesterday.The emerging decision amounts to an embarrassing admission by the administration that it could not make its threat against China stick. Faced with U.S. business pressure to maintain trade ties and with an apparent refusal by China to take the trade threat seriously, the administration is now looking for different ways to pressure China on human rights, officials said.
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