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By Simon Habtemariam | November 1, 2011
Since opening his Dreamteam Ink tattoo and piercing studio in 2009 in Randallstown, James "JJ" Joseph, 26, has kept an open mind as to what customers could use for payment. In addition to cash, he's received flat-screen TVs, car audio equipment, jewelry, laptops, cell phones and more. About four weeks ago, a happy client not only helped spread the word on his business, but gave him a $1,200 Teacup Yorkie puppy he named Tank. This does not strike him as unusual. "Bartering has become very popular lately.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Simon Habtemariam | November 1, 2011
Since opening his Dreamteam Ink tattoo and piercing studio in 2009 in Randallstown, James "JJ" Joseph, 26, has kept an open mind as to what customers could use for payment. In addition to cash, he's received flat-screen TVs, car audio equipment, jewelry, laptops, cell phones and more. About four weeks ago, a happy client not only helped spread the word on his business, but gave him a $1,200 Teacup Yorkie puppy he named Tank. This does not strike him as unusual. "Bartering has become very popular lately.
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BUSINESS
By THE DETROIT NEWS | July 6, 2006
DETROIT -- The U.S. attorney in Detroit yesterday announced charges of stealing trade secrets against three former employees of an auto supplier, saying economic espionage stabs at the heart of the Michigan economy and is a growing priority among his federal prosecutors. The former employees of Metaldyne Corp., arraigned in U.S. District Court after a 64-count grand jury indictment was unsealed, are accused of stealing the Plymouth, Mich., company's trade secrets and sharing them with Chinese competitors.
NEWS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2006
It might have been honor. It might have been fear. Or even self-interest. Possibly, all motivated PepsiCo officials to turn in those who tried to sell the company a secret new beverage recipe belonging to archrival Coca-Cola Co. Whatever the company's reasons, several experts in business ethics and intellectual property say they are not surprised that Pepsi didn't take the bait. Many say they would expect other large companies to refuse if offered their chief competitor's trade secrets.
BUSINESS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1996
Smelkinson Sysco Food Services, a Jessup food service company, filed a $6.01 million lawsuit yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against a competitor and six former employees, alleging unfair competition and theft of secret trade information.The suit alleges that Alliant Foodservice Inc., a Deerfield, Ill.-based company that has a local office within two miles of Smelkinson's Jessup operation, has systematically attempted since November 1995 to use Smelkinson's confidential information and trade secrets, hire its employees and pirate its customers.
FEATURES
By Dylan Landis and Dylan Landis,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | December 28, 1997
Imagine a private seminar with you and, oh, 20 or 30 designers who are dying to reveal their trade secrets.One of them, Michael Tedrick, confides that he lives in just 400 square feet. "Rolling carts are a blessing for small apartments," he advises. "Televisions and VCRs and sound equipment are best kept out of sight from day to day. They tend to take over the room and become too much of a focus."Stephen Brady urges you to look for beauty in unexpected places. He learned this the day he peeled storm-damaged wallpaper from his living room walls and fell in love with the mottled green and white tones underneath.
NEWS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2006
It might have been honor. It might have been fear. Or even self-interest. Possibly, all motivated PepsiCo officials to turn in those who tried to sell the company a secret new beverage recipe belonging to archrival Coca-Cola Co. Whatever the company's reasons, several experts in business ethics and intellectual property say they are not surprised that Pepsi didn't take the bait. Many say they would expect other large companies to refuse if offered their chief competitor's trade secrets.
NEWS
February 18, 1991
Four retailers have recently joined Marley Station Mall's hundreds of retail stores and restaurants in Glen Burnie.Little Folks, Stash & Stella's, Trade Secrets, and Zacks Famous Frozen Yogurt have opened in the last few months, adding to the mix of merchandise and services available at the mall.Little Folks, located on the upper level by Marley Station's center court, features a selection of moderately priced sportswear and casual clothing for children.Stash & Stella's decor is styled afterthe diners of the 1950s and 1960s.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 30, 1993
FRANKFURT, Germany -- The industrial espionage battle between Volkswagen AG and General Motors Corp. broadened yesterday as prosecutors in Hamburg announced a new investigation of Jose Ignacio Lopez de Arriortua, the VW production chief, whom GM has accused of stealing its trade secrets.The new investigation coincided with a fresh round of mudslinging a day after Ferdinand Piech, the chairman of VW, suggested that GM might have manipulated evidence. He accused GM of waging "international economic war in order to ruin VW."
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 10, 1997
Scarcely a week after it filed a lawsuit accusing General Electric Co. of "systematically and aggressively" hiring employees privy to trade secrets, Dow Chemical Co. said yesterday that the two companies had reached an "amicable resolution" of the matter.Details of the settlement were not disclosed, but both Dow and General Electric said no money was involved.In a joint statement, Dow Executive Vice President Anthony J. Carbone and GE Plastics President Gary L. Rogers said the dispute was resolved after conversations between them and the exchange of information between the companies.
BUSINESS
By THE DETROIT NEWS | July 6, 2006
DETROIT -- The U.S. attorney in Detroit yesterday announced charges of stealing trade secrets against three former employees of an auto supplier, saying economic espionage stabs at the heart of the Michigan economy and is a growing priority among his federal prosecutors. The former employees of Metaldyne Corp., arraigned in U.S. District Court after a 64-count grand jury indictment was unsealed, are accused of stealing the Plymouth, Mich., company's trade secrets and sharing them with Chinese competitors.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 12, 2005
SAN JOSE, Calif. - A California Superior Court judge ruled yesterday that Apple Computer is entitled to subpoena the name and e-mail of the confidential source who leaked information about an unreleased product. The case has garnered national attention because it raises the issue of whether bloggers are journalists who are entitled to legal protections from disclosing the names of confidential sources. Superior Court Judge James P. Kleinberg, in San Jose, did not address what he described as the "complicated" question of who is a journalist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Carpenter and Susan Carpenter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 24, 2004
First came pirate radio, then Internet radio. But in the past month, a new way of circumventing the big, bad broadcast corporations has emerged: podcasts. Tune in to these blog-based homemade radio shows, and you'll hear any number of things: a weekly hourlong program about board games; a daily amateur photography show with an Australian computer programmer as host; regular people, unschooled in the ways of radio, talking about anything and everything the way real people talk - clumsily, with curses, dead air and all. If you've never heard of a podcast, don't worry.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2002
After meeting yesterday with leaders of Maryland's academic medical centers, a state delegate said he would soften his proposal to require more public scrutiny of medical experiments, but the plan still faces opposition. Del. James W. Hubbard told representatives from the Johns Hopkins medical school and the University of Maryland in a closed-door session yesterday that he would revise his proposal to require university review boards to open their records to the public. House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. said he opposes even that watered-down proposal.
FEATURES
By Dylan Landis and Dylan Landis,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | December 28, 1997
Imagine a private seminar with you and, oh, 20 or 30 designers who are dying to reveal their trade secrets.One of them, Michael Tedrick, confides that he lives in just 400 square feet. "Rolling carts are a blessing for small apartments," he advises. "Televisions and VCRs and sound equipment are best kept out of sight from day to day. They tend to take over the room and become too much of a focus."Stephen Brady urges you to look for beauty in unexpected places. He learned this the day he peeled storm-damaged wallpaper from his living room walls and fell in love with the mottled green and white tones underneath.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 10, 1997
Scarcely a week after it filed a lawsuit accusing General Electric Co. of "systematically and aggressively" hiring employees privy to trade secrets, Dow Chemical Co. said yesterday that the two companies had reached an "amicable resolution" of the matter.Details of the settlement were not disclosed, but both Dow and General Electric said no money was involved.In a joint statement, Dow Executive Vice President Anthony J. Carbone and GE Plastics President Gary L. Rogers said the dispute was resolved after conversations between them and the exchange of information between the companies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Carpenter and Susan Carpenter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 24, 2004
First came pirate radio, then Internet radio. But in the past month, a new way of circumventing the big, bad broadcast corporations has emerged: podcasts. Tune in to these blog-based homemade radio shows, and you'll hear any number of things: a weekly hourlong program about board games; a daily amateur photography show with an Australian computer programmer as host; regular people, unschooled in the ways of radio, talking about anything and everything the way real people talk - clumsily, with curses, dead air and all. If you've never heard of a podcast, don't worry.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | May 25, 1992
Feeling unappreciated? Convinced that you can do a better job than your boss?Going into business for yourself can bring greater freedom and rewards.Take Allan Charles, who left the W. B. Doner advertising agency because his boss wouldn't give him a $1,500 raise. He went on to help found Trahan Burden and Charles. "We were pretty young and dumb," he recalled. However, being his own boss allowed him to try new ideas, and he said he retains a good relationship with W. B. Doner.But, starting a company that competes with your former boss can create special problems.
BUSINESS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1996
Smelkinson Sysco Food Services, a Jessup food service company, filed a $6.01 million lawsuit yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against a competitor and six former employees, alleging unfair competition and theft of secret trade information.The suit alleges that Alliant Foodservice Inc., a Deerfield, Ill.-based company that has a local office within two miles of Smelkinson's Jessup operation, has systematically attempted since November 1995 to use Smelkinson's confidential information and trade secrets, hire its employees and pirate its customers.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 24, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The extent of John Huang's access to sensitive intelligence on overseas trade while he was an official of the Department of Commerce is becoming a key focus of congressional inquiries into the international banker and heavyweight Democratic fund-raiser.Investigators say Huang might have had access to a wealth of financial and commercial information that could benefit his former employers at the Lippo Group, a multibillion-dollar Indonesian conglomerate with interests spanning the Pacific.
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