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By New York Times News Service | May 17, 1991
WASHINGTON -- With its hooked beak, scaly neck and stubby legs, the yard-long hawksbill sea turtle will win no beauty contests. But this homely creature, an endangered vestige of the dinosaur age, is suddenly at the center of a squall in U.S.-Japanese relations.It does not have the grace of a dolphin, the majesty of a whale or the mournful appeal of a baby harp seal. But the hawksbill may prompt the first use of a U.S. law authorizing curbs on imports of fish and other wildlife products from countries that contribute to the disappearance of an endangered species.
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NEWS
September 30, 2004
THE TREASURY Department's bone-headed decision not to allow U.S. publishers to edit the works of writers from trade-sanctioned countries has ended up in court. One trusts the Constitution, again, will prevail. After a year of confusion, protest and clarifications that themselves could have used some editing, a group of U.S. publishers is suing Treasury Secretary John W. Snow and the department's Office of Foreign Assets Control, saying its rule that publishers must obtain government license to edit copy violates the First Amendment as well as laws that exempt "information and information materials" from being included in trade sanctions (which affect Cuba, Iran and Sudan)
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 17, 1996
BEIJING -- China and the United States neared agreement early today on how to fight the piracy of music, movies and computer software, as trade negotiators appeared ready to call off $2 billion in trade sanctions that are scheduled to take effect today.Charlene Barshefsky, the acting U.S. trade representative, stayed at the negotiating table well past midnight, seated across from China's deputy trade minister, Shi Guangsheng, to work on final aspects of documents on which they expected to agree, a U.S. official said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 2, 2003
WASHINGTON - President Bush may announce as early as this week that he plans to repeal tariffs on imported steel after the European Union and Japan threatened sanctions on $2.3 billion in U.S. goods, a White House official said yesterday. Bush plans to comply with a ruling by the World Trade Organization after accepting counsel from advisers that trade disputes would do more harm than good, said the official, speaking on condition of anonymity. A decision won't be announced until after Bush travels to Pittsburgh today to raise money for his re-election campaign, the aide said.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 5, 2003
WASHINGTON - Europe's top trade official said here yesterday that the United States can expect up to $6 billion in trade sanctions if President Bush doesn't lift steel tariffs and Congress doesn't eliminate overseas tax shelters for U.S. exporters. Two months after global trade talks fell apart in Cancun, Mexico, and with Democrats attacking free-trade agreements in the presidential campaign, Pascal Lamy, the European Union's trade commissioner, said Europe has shown enough patience with the United States over those issues.
NEWS
May 10, 2002
THE AXIS OF EVIL has been expanded by a factor of one wily Cuban dictator. That's the latest on terrorism from the Bush administration. In an address this week to the Heritage Foundation, John R. Bolton, the undersecretary of state for arms control and international security, accused Cuba of sharing its biotechnology capabilities with "rogue" states for possibly nefarious uses. He offered nothing substantive to support his contention and neither did the State Department. How convenient that the Bush administration sounds the terrorism alarm the week before former President Jimmy Carter travels to Havana on a humanitarian mission.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | May 6, 1995
The Clinton administration appeared headed last night toward a nasty trade showdown with Japan, after three days of intense negotiations over American access to the Japanese automobile market ended in failure.The last day of talks in Vancouver, British Columbia, were finished off last night with a terse statement from U.S. Trade Rep. Mickey Kantor."The government of Japan has refused to address our most fundamental concerns in all areas," Mr. Kantor said. "Discrimination against foreign manufacturers of autos and auto parts continues."
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Mark Matthews and Dan Fesperman and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 29, 1990
WASHINGTON -- President Bush vowed yesterday to th leader of Kuwait that his country will be reclaimed from the invasion forces of Iraq -- a pledge that came amid a wide variety of developments pointing to a greater likelihood of war by year's end.Shortly after Mr. Bush's statement, his national security adviser, Brent Scowcroft, followed up with a thinly veiled threat of military action, saying that Iraq's rapid pillaging and resettlement of Kuwait have...
NEWS
By David H. Feldman | December 28, 2000
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. -- Japan again has roiled the waters of international diplomacy with the departure in late November of a whaling fleet headed for a hunting expedition in the Antarctic. In September, a fleet returned from the northern Pacific with a catch that included 43 Bryde's whales and five Sperm whales. The International Whaling Commission (IWC) considers both species to be endangered. As usual, the U.S. response includes a threat of trade sanctions. President Clinton is to decide shortly whether to impose trade measures against Japan under the Pelly Amendment to the Fisherman's Protection Act of 1967.
NEWS
September 30, 2004
THE TREASURY Department's bone-headed decision not to allow U.S. publishers to edit the works of writers from trade-sanctioned countries has ended up in court. One trusts the Constitution, again, will prevail. After a year of confusion, protest and clarifications that themselves could have used some editing, a group of U.S. publishers is suing Treasury Secretary John W. Snow and the department's Office of Foreign Assets Control, saying its rule that publishers must obtain government license to edit copy violates the First Amendment as well as laws that exempt "information and information materials" from being included in trade sanctions (which affect Cuba, Iran and Sudan)
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 5, 2003
WASHINGTON - Europe's top trade official said here yesterday that the United States can expect up to $6 billion in trade sanctions if President Bush doesn't lift steel tariffs and Congress doesn't eliminate overseas tax shelters for U.S. exporters. Two months after global trade talks fell apart in Cancun, Mexico, and with Democrats attacking free-trade agreements in the presidential campaign, Pascal Lamy, the European Union's trade commissioner, said Europe has shown enough patience with the United States over those issues.
NEWS
May 10, 2002
THE AXIS OF EVIL has been expanded by a factor of one wily Cuban dictator. That's the latest on terrorism from the Bush administration. In an address this week to the Heritage Foundation, John R. Bolton, the undersecretary of state for arms control and international security, accused Cuba of sharing its biotechnology capabilities with "rogue" states for possibly nefarious uses. He offered nothing substantive to support his contention and neither did the State Department. How convenient that the Bush administration sounds the terrorism alarm the week before former President Jimmy Carter travels to Havana on a humanitarian mission.
NEWS
By David H. Feldman | December 28, 2000
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. -- Japan again has roiled the waters of international diplomacy with the departure in late November of a whaling fleet headed for a hunting expedition in the Antarctic. In September, a fleet returned from the northern Pacific with a catch that included 43 Bryde's whales and five Sperm whales. The International Whaling Commission (IWC) considers both species to be endangered. As usual, the U.S. response includes a threat of trade sanctions. President Clinton is to decide shortly whether to impose trade measures against Japan under the Pelly Amendment to the Fisherman's Protection Act of 1967.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 4, 1997
WASHINGTON -- After weeks of lobbying, President Clinton virtually guaranteed yesterday that the Senate will renew the trade negotiating authority that he has called a centerpiece of his economic policy.Clinton won over the support of Tom Daschle, the Senate minority leader, on the so-called "fast track" trade legislation.The South Dakota Democrat announced his backing yesterday, the day before a key vote in the Senate. The administration now hopes to use his conversion to help rally Democratic support in the House, where the president still faces an uphill fight.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 18, 1996
KRAGUJEVAC, Yugoslavia -- Remember the Yugo?Down at the Zastava Group factory, a skeleton work crew of fewer than 1,200 struggles to keep the cheap and cheerless little auto alive.In 1989, before Yugoslavia disintegrated and went to war, the factory churned out 200,000 of these cars.They broke down so often, they gave Yugoslav workmanship a bad reputation in the United States.This year, the workers will be lucky to produce 8,000.The story of the Yugo and the Zastava Group is the story of Yugoslavia's economy, shattered by war and 3 1/2 years of United Nations-imposed trade sanctions that were lifted only last winter.
NEWS
By Jonathan Power | October 11, 1996
LONDON -- Sanctions are poured out like libations to gods neglectful of an unruly world. Tomorrow it could be Burma's turn. Yesterday it was Serbia's and China's. It goes on being Iraq's. It ++ is Cuba's, Libya's and Iran's -- at least for now, depending on last week's decision of the European Union to challenge U.S. trade sanctions and protect European companies from the reach of American law.American foreign policy these days is one half-part Wilsonian sanctions. As the World War 1 president said, ''A nation that is boycotted is a nation that is in sight of surrender.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 4, 1997
WASHINGTON -- After weeks of lobbying, President Clinton virtually guaranteed yesterday that the Senate will renew the trade negotiating authority that he has called a centerpiece of his economic policy.Clinton won over the support of Tom Daschle, the Senate minority leader, on the so-called "fast track" trade legislation.The South Dakota Democrat announced his backing yesterday, the day before a key vote in the Senate. The administration now hopes to use his conversion to help rally Democratic support in the House, where the president still faces an uphill fight.
NEWS
By Jonathan Power | October 11, 1996
LONDON -- Sanctions are poured out like libations to gods neglectful of an unruly world. Tomorrow it could be Burma's turn. Yesterday it was Serbia's and China's. It goes on being Iraq's. It ++ is Cuba's, Libya's and Iran's -- at least for now, depending on last week's decision of the European Union to challenge U.S. trade sanctions and protect European companies from the reach of American law.American foreign policy these days is one half-part Wilsonian sanctions. As the World War 1 president said, ''A nation that is boycotted is a nation that is in sight of surrender.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 17, 1996
BEIJING -- China and the United States neared agreement early today on how to fight the piracy of music, movies and computer software, as trade negotiators appeared ready to call off $2 billion in trade sanctions that are scheduled to take effect today.Charlene Barshefsky, the acting U.S. trade representative, stayed at the negotiating table well past midnight, seated across from China's deputy trade minister, Shi Guangsheng, to work on final aspects of documents on which they expected to agree, a U.S. official said.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | May 6, 1995
The Clinton administration appeared headed last night toward a nasty trade showdown with Japan, after three days of intense negotiations over American access to the Japanese automobile market ended in failure.The last day of talks in Vancouver, British Columbia, were finished off last night with a terse statement from U.S. Trade Rep. Mickey Kantor."The government of Japan has refused to address our most fundamental concerns in all areas," Mr. Kantor said. "Discrimination against foreign manufacturers of autos and auto parts continues."
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