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By JOHN M. McCLINTOCK and JOHN M. McCLINTOCK,John McClintock was The Sun's Mexico City correspondent from 1987 until this June | August 9, 1992
Anyone who spends more than a few hours in Tijuana, Mexico, will eventually come across a bunch of people waiting by the drainage canal along the U.S. border.They are among the two million or so who cross the southern border illegally into the United States every year.More than 97 percent are Mexicans, the victims of an economic catastrophe that has troubled Mexico for more than a decade.When the time is right, they will race across the empty drainage ditch into a land of unbelievable riches.
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NEWS
By Betsy Johnson | January 22, 2014
With climate disruption increasingly affecting Maryland's priceless environmental treasures, it's time the federal government stopped bargaining with our natural resources and started protecting our future as it looks to import and export more resources overseas. The Trans-Pacific Partnership - a massive trade pact between the U.S. and 11 countries along the Pacific Rim - could result in more environmental degradation, job loss, and more dangerous fracking affecting nearly every aspect of our lives, from the quality of our water to the quality of our jobs.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Cocaine smugglers working with Colombian drug cartels are starting to set up factories, warehouses and trucking companies in Mexico to exploit the flood of cross-border commerce expected under the North American Free Trade Agreement, U.S. intelligence and drug-enforcement officials say.The Mexican smugglers are buying and setting up the companies "as fronts for drug trafficking," says a report written by an intelligence officer at the U.S....
NEWS
October 7, 2011
Your editorial on pending trade agreements ("The benefits of trade," Oct. 6) reports projected benefits to the depressed U.S. economy from the proposed trade deals with South Korea, Colombia, and Panama of $12 billion in exports and tens of thousands of jobs. Though smaller than the 200,000 jobs and untold billions in exports to Canada and Mexico that NAFTA was expected to provide, the new projections are equally bogus. In fact, America's trade deficit with Canada (which averaged a modest $8.1 billion in the four years preceding NAFTA)
BUSINESS
By Clyde H. Farnsworth LTC and Clyde H. Farnsworth LTC,New York Times News Service | May 1, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration, facing a critical vote in Congress next month over its authority to negotiate with other countries on trade, will make significant environmental and job-security commitments to accompany a trade pact with Mexico, administration and congressional aides said yesterday.The commitments are intended to sway votes in a battle that has pitted the administration and proponents of free trade against organized labor, textile interests and others who fear that loosened restrictions on trade with Mexico will result in the loss of jobs and a weakening of environmental and labor standards.
NEWS
By Betsy Johnson | January 22, 2014
With climate disruption increasingly affecting Maryland's priceless environmental treasures, it's time the federal government stopped bargaining with our natural resources and started protecting our future as it looks to import and export more resources overseas. The Trans-Pacific Partnership - a massive trade pact between the U.S. and 11 countries along the Pacific Rim - could result in more environmental degradation, job loss, and more dangerous fracking affecting nearly every aspect of our lives, from the quality of our water to the quality of our jobs.
NEWS
July 22, 1994
President Clinton had better start paying close attention to the state of trade legislation if he is to attain his key economic objective on Capitol Hill this year. While he is focused on such blue-ribbon domestic issues as health care and welfare reform, the rest of the world is waiting for Congress to ratify the vast liberalization in global commerce negotiated over seven hard years under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.What had seemed a fairly routine ritual under which Congress would find revenues to offset a projected five-year $12 billion loss in tariff receipts is developing into an ideological battle over the linkage of trade with environmental and labor standards.
NEWS
By Michael Wilson | May 1, 1991
MORE IS at stake over a U.S.-Mexico free trade agreement than expanding American investment opportunities or keeping Mexican workers from slipping across the border.If Congress fails to extend "fast-track" authority next month to the Bush administration to negotiate an agreement, the trade talks will collapse. And so will the improving U.S.-Mexican relationship, so vital to Mexico's economic growth and America's influence in the hemisphere.Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari has an enormous investment in extension of a fast track, which provides for a simple up-or-down, no-amendment vote in Congress on any international trade agreements signed by the president.
NEWS
By Peter Bowe | May 18, 2010
For 125 years, Baltimore has been home to Ellicott Dredges, a heavy equipment manufacturer and the world's oldest and largest builder of medium-sized cutter suction dredges, which are used for everything from harbor maintenance to beach restoration and environmental cleanups. As a manufacturer of such a specialized product, we have to look for opportunities to market anywhere there may be a demand — which is usually outside the state of Maryland and often far beyond the borders of the United States.
NEWS
October 7, 2011
Your editorial on pending trade agreements ("The benefits of trade," Oct. 6) reports projected benefits to the depressed U.S. economy from the proposed trade deals with South Korea, Colombia, and Panama of $12 billion in exports and tens of thousands of jobs. Though smaller than the 200,000 jobs and untold billions in exports to Canada and Mexico that NAFTA was expected to provide, the new projections are equally bogus. In fact, America's trade deficit with Canada (which averaged a modest $8.1 billion in the four years preceding NAFTA)
NEWS
By Kim Jensen | May 2, 2011
I just returned from a 10-day human rights delegation to Colombia sponsored by Witness for Peace. While we were in the midst of our intensive meetings in Valle del Cauca, Northern Cauca, and Bogota, we discovered that a high profile-American delegation had just arrived in the capital for its own two-day tour. The U.S. Congressional Ways and Means Committee had sent a bipartisan fact-finding mission to Colombia, co-sponsored by Maryland Rep. Steny Hoyer. What an amazing coincidence: two American delegations were gathering facts about Colombia at the same time.
NEWS
By Peter Bowe | May 18, 2010
For 125 years, Baltimore has been home to Ellicott Dredges, a heavy equipment manufacturer and the world's oldest and largest builder of medium-sized cutter suction dredges, which are used for everything from harbor maintenance to beach restoration and environmental cleanups. As a manufacturer of such a specialized product, we have to look for opportunities to market anywhere there may be a demand — which is usually outside the state of Maryland and often far beyond the borders of the United States.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | July 27, 2008
Like everyone else, farmers have a stake in the presidential election. With this in mind, officials of the American Farm Bureau Federation invited presidential candidates Barack Obama and John McCain to speak by teleconference to their recent Council of Presidents meeting in Washington. Each of the candidates pledged continued support for American agriculture. The following excerpts from their presentations were included in a news release from the bureau, a 6.2 million-member farm lobbying organization representing all 50 states and Puerto Rico.
BUSINESS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 22, 2004
MOSCOW - Russia signed a landmark trade agreement with Europe yesterday in a deal President Vladimir V. Putin said will encourage Russia to "speed up" consideration of the Kyoto global warming treaty. Giving a boost to European hopes that Russia might bring the protocol to reduce greenhouse gases back from the brink of failure, Putin said agreement with Europe on the trade pact - which could significantly boost Russia's hopes for joining the World Trade Organization - will prompt Moscow to move quickly toward a ratification vote on the Kyoto accord.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 28, 2002
WASHINGTON - By a three-vote margin, the House of Representatives voted early yesterday to give President Bush the power to negotiate international trade agreements that Congress can ratify or reject but can't rewrite. The president later hailed the vote, saying the "fast track" trade promotion authority "will open markets, expand opportunity and create jobs for American workers and farmers." Senate approval of the measure could come as early as this week. The Senate, which is generally friendlier to trade, passed its version of the measure 66-30 earlier this year, and negotiators from the House and Senate set the stage for yesterday's House vote by reaching a surprise agreement Friday night.
NEWS
April 24, 2001
THE STUNNING aspect of the summit of 34 American nations in Quebec City over the weekend was that all the heads of government were elected by their peoples. That has often not been the case in the Americas. This legitimacy is what stands out most about their commitment to strengthen democracy in the hemisphere and to negotiate a Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) by 2005. Only Fidel Castro of Cuba was not there, excluded by the club as a dictator. President Jean-Bertrand Aristide of Haiti endured a lecture from the host, fellow Francophone Prime Minister Jean Chretien of Canada, for the shortcomings in his election last May. The notion of restricting the proposed free trade area to democracies, though vaguely stated, strengthens fair elections and discourages coups.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 16, 1994
MARRAKESH, Morocco -- Culminating more than seven years of arduous and often bitter bargaining, ministers from 109 countries signed a far-reaching trade liberalization agreement yesterday aimed at stimulating exports and slashing tariffs around the world.The agreement is the eighth to be concluded since World War II but is easily the most ambitious, reducing import tariffs by an average of 40 percent and embracing for the first time such areas as agriculture, textiles and financial services.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | December 2, 1992
PARIS -- With France busily trying to win allies in its fight against a U.S.-European Community farm-trade agreement, tens of thousands of farmers from across Western Europe filled the streets of the French border city of Strasbourg yesterday to protest the pact.French farm unions, which contend that the accord will badly damage French agriculture, chose Strasbourg for the day-long demonstration not only because it is the headquarters of the European Parliament, but also because it is within easy reach of German farmers.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jay Hancock and Jonathan Weisman and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 20, 2000
WASHINGTON - The European Union reached a market-opening trade accord with China yesterday, clearing the last major hurdle impeding China's accession to the World Trade Organization and adding a powerful argument to President Clinton's efforts to normalize trade with the Communist giant. The European deal came at a critical time for the administration: A vote in the House to permanently normalize trade relations with China is scheduled for Wednesday. With Senate passage virtually assured, the real battle is in the House.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 4, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The European Union's surprising failure to reach a trade deal with China adds a new obstacle to President Clinton's efforts to win approval for a U.S.-China trade pact and raises the chances that Congress will postpone the politically sensitive matter until next year, lobbyists and analysts for both sides say. The breakdown in Chinese-European talks last week removes at least temporarily the danger that French and German companies will...
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