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NEWS
August 31, 2011
I fully agree with letter writer Thomas Jandl ("Free trade does not kill jobs," Aug. 30) that fewer trade barriers mean more jobs. We are living in a worldwide economy and it is time that the people in the U.S. realize this as a great opportunity and not a threat. It is tough for Americans to switch from a consumer to a creator when you don't have an efficient education system and poorly educated professionals. Other countries offer free education including college and trade school.
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NEWS
August 31, 2011
I fully agree with letter writer Thomas Jandl ("Free trade does not kill jobs," Aug. 30) that fewer trade barriers mean more jobs. We are living in a worldwide economy and it is time that the people in the U.S. realize this as a great opportunity and not a threat. It is tough for Americans to switch from a consumer to a creator when you don't have an efficient education system and poorly educated professionals. Other countries offer free education including college and trade school.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 16, 1994
BOGOR, Indonesia -- Leaders of 18 Pacific Rim countries formally committed themselves yesterday to dismantling all trade barriers within the next 25 years, but last-minute objections from two nations showed how fragile their alliance remains.After a 6-hour meeting at the opulent summer palace of Indonesian President Suharto, the leaders of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum pledged that their industrialized members will drop all barriers by the year 2010 and that developing countries will do so by 2020.
NEWS
April 10, 2008
Hillary Clinton fired her chief campaign strategist this week in an embarrassing tiff over free trade. She's against it, and he was helping Colombia promote a free trade treaty with America. The opposition of Mrs. Clinton, Sen. Barack Obama and others to free trade is understandable during an economic downturn (and presidential campaign), but their protests miss the point. Free trade isn't the problem, the terms of the deals are. Nations that trade with the United States should be held to the same tough environmental rules that apply here, agree to much stronger protections for union workers and respect American copyright and patent rights.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 5, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Any U.S. business pondering whether to take a crack at the bountiful market of Japan might first consider the pile of debt burying New Jersey inventor Sal Monte.A dozen years ago, Mr. Monte's small company, Kenrich Petrochemicals, set out to conquer Japan armed with 15 patented chemical additives that did such things as juice up the performance of audio recording tapes.One by one, the Japanese knocked his products off the market, citing environmental regulations and other fine print -- although those rules never affected the Japanese-made products that sprung up in their place.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | December 30, 1992
LONDON -- At the stroke of midnight on New Year's Eve, thousands of Britons may be poised to return from a day's shopping in France or Belgium.At that hour they will be able to fill their cars with almost unlimited supplies of the cheaper alcohol and tobacco available in those countries, then return home without paying customs duties.Britain's Sunday Times recently said that a Briton would be able to save $385, even allowing for the cost of crossing the English Channel by ferry, by buying 28 cases of wine in France or `D Belgium, where excise taxes are lower.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | April 6, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Fuji Photo Film, citing "glaring flaws" in an annual U.S. review of foreign trade barriers, yesterday renewed its call for a neutral fact-finding mechanism to resolve allegations that Japan's market for photographic film isn't open to foreign competition.A National Trade Estimate report released this week "provides a one-sided picture of market conditions in Japan," Fuji Film lawyer Bill Barringer said in a letter delivered to U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor.The NTE report is based entirely on the "uncritical acceptance of Kodak's allegations rather than any objective investigation of hotly disputed facts," Mr. Barringer said in his letter to Mr. Kantor.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | December 30, 1991
Not long ago, Belfort Instrument Co. practically had a corner on the market when it sold meteorological instruments in Great Britain and Italy.But all that has changed for the Baltimore-based manufacturer."
NEWS
April 27, 1993
IS THE giant business corporation succumbing to a hostile environment, like the dinosaur? Could very well be, according to the Economist of London. "Corporate giants once walked tall and proud, bestriding the globe, champions of this century's miraculous economic growth . . . But these are troubling times for the world's biggest companies." The weekly points to the woes of giants like General Motors, IBM and Britain's Philips as prime examples."The humbling of big firms has only just begun," the Economist direly forecasts.
NEWS
December 8, 1999
THE debacle in Seattle last week was a defeat for President Clinton. It was also a delay, probably of one year, in forging a world consensus agenda for further lowering trade barriers. Any exultation or damnation that the street demonstrators prevailed, however, is dead wrong.What happened inside the World Trade Organization's conference hall is that the United States deadlocked with most other nations. President Clinton adopted some of the positions of organized labor and the environmental movement as the U.S. initiative.
NEWS
July 29, 2005
THE PRESIDENT had to go to Capital Hill to lobby for it. Sugar and textile producers had to be given guarantees. All manner of pork had to be doled out. But late Wednesday, the administration pushed through the Central American Free Trade Agreement -- by two votes. This fight was about politics, not economics. Trade with the six nations covered by CAFTA is relatively small. Almost 80 percent of their exports to the United States already enter without tariffs. In mercantile terms -- by opening the region to U.S. exports -- America likely gains modestly.
BUSINESS
By William Neikirk and William Neikirk,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 13, 2005
WASHINGTON - Imports of expensive oil and cheap textiles helped drive the U.S. trade deficit to a record $61 billion in February, the government said yesterday, as America's ravenous appetite for foreign goods showed no signs of abating. Economists expressed concern about the trade deficit's surprise worsening from January's trade gap of $58.5 billion. As a result of the new numbers, many economists lowered their projections for first-quarter economic growth. The Commerce Department said the United States exported $100.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2003
MIAMI - As tens of thousands marched in protest nearby, some with Steelworkers union flags and giant cardboard sunflowers, trade ministers from across the Americas approved yesterday a buffet-style plan to create the world's largest free-trade bloc. The Free Trade Area of the Americas would extend the decade-old North American Free Trade Agreement to eliminate tariffs and trade barriers among all Western Hemisphere countries except Cuba. By late yesterday afternoon, 36 protesters had been arrested outside the temporary metal fencing that surrounded the Intercontinental Hotel, where trade ministers from 34 countries met. Two police officers were injured during protests.
BUSINESS
By WILLIAM PATALON III | November 19, 2000
In the world of economics, there are few topics that polarize us as does talk about the U.S. trade deficit. For the worrywarts among us, it isn't just that our nation spends (imports) more than it takes in (exports) that causes such angst - after all, that's standard operating procedure for many Americans. Their fear instead stems from the understanding that the trade shortfall has to be financed through foreign debt - or by selling our securities, properties and even our companies to overseas interests.
NEWS
December 8, 1999
THE debacle in Seattle last week was a defeat for President Clinton. It was also a delay, probably of one year, in forging a world consensus agenda for further lowering trade barriers. Any exultation or damnation that the street demonstrators prevailed, however, is dead wrong.What happened inside the World Trade Organization's conference hall is that the United States deadlocked with most other nations. President Clinton adopted some of the positions of organized labor and the environmental movement as the U.S. initiative.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1997
In their corner grocery in East Baltimore, Ki Nam Yi and his wife, Sung Cha Yi, measure out their 13-hour days in small sales of soda pop and potato chips, white bread and homemade iced tea, candy and cigarettes.The first-floor windows of the worn old rowhouse at the corner of Luzerne Avenue and Preston Street are boarded up. The overhead sign still says Green's Grocery; in the early '60s, a couple of guys named Isadore and Ruben Green owned the store, and nobody's bothered to change the sign since.
NEWS
November 16, 1994
The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation group's pledge to create a giant free-trade area by 2020 was a clarion call for action. But nothing more. If this statement of intentions has the desired effect, it will act as a goad and measuring rod for the 18 member nations rimming the Pacific that now produce half the world's economic output.As such, it is a boost for President Clinton's free-trade policy, a crusade his administration picked up from Presidents Reagan and Bush. But it masks more disputes than it resolves.
NEWS
July 29, 2005
THE PRESIDENT had to go to Capital Hill to lobby for it. Sugar and textile producers had to be given guarantees. All manner of pork had to be doled out. But late Wednesday, the administration pushed through the Central American Free Trade Agreement -- by two votes. This fight was about politics, not economics. Trade with the six nations covered by CAFTA is relatively small. Almost 80 percent of their exports to the United States already enter without tariffs. In mercantile terms -- by opening the region to U.S. exports -- America likely gains modestly.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | April 6, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Fuji Photo Film, citing "glaring flaws" in an annual U.S. review of foreign trade barriers, yesterday renewed its call for a neutral fact-finding mechanism to resolve allegations that Japan's market for photographic film isn't open to foreign competition.A National Trade Estimate report released this week "provides a one-sided picture of market conditions in Japan," Fuji Film lawyer Bill Barringer said in a letter delivered to U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor.The NTE report is based entirely on the "uncritical acceptance of Kodak's allegations rather than any objective investigation of hotly disputed facts," Mr. Barringer said in his letter to Mr. Kantor.
NEWS
December 4, 1994
The world will be a smaller and better place, starting as early as Jan. 1, because of the bipartisan wisdom of three presidents and the 103rd Congress in enacting the world trade accord expanding the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, which began in 1947.With the globe's dramatic shrinkage for communications and travel, most trade barriers are anachronisms that impoverish the peoples of the world. The new GATT will not end such barriers -- it includes more than 2,000 pages of them, tortuously negotiated over eight years by 124 countries -- but greatly reduces them.
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