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By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1994
Rob Goldman, director of Columbia's mini-empire of recreational facilities, will spearhead an effort during the next year to improve the quality of athletic clubs worldwide.Mr. Goldman, membership services director for the Columbia Association, begins a one-year term Wednesday as board president of Boston-based IRSA/The Association of Quality Clubs, an international organization of 2,400 health and sports clubs. He was elected by IRSA's nine-member board."It's an honor to the Columbia Association and a recognition of how fine and respected the recreational facilities and programs are, as much as it is a personal honor," said Mr. Goldman, a Columbia Association vice president since 1989.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
The Internet and social media are radically reshaping many organizations — even, in an odd twist, a technology trade association. This is the reality that confronts Sharon Webb, the chief executive who's been in charge of the Greater Baltimore Tech Council since December. Webb took over at the association in January and has spent the past year on its transformation. Before the rise of social media and easy online networking, the GBTC was the go-to source for events geared toward technology pros and entrepreneurs in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1998
The nation will need 150,000 more electricians by the turn of the century, and welfare recipients need jobs.That makes for a perfect combination of supply and demand, according to Independent Electrical Contractors, a national trade association with a chapter in Odenton.I.E.C. Chesapeake is opening a training building in Odenton and wants to fill it with area welfare recipients willing to become electrician apprentices."Each week in the Sunday employment section, there's about 10 to 20 companies that are hiring electricians," said Grant Shmelzer, executive director of I.E.C.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | November 29, 2006
The National Association of Realtors lost a bid to dismiss a U.S. government antitrust lawsuit challenging its limits on access to multiple listings by consumers who use lower-cost Internet brokers. The ruling by a federal judge in Chicago lets the Justice Department proceed to pretrial fact-finding to try to prove that the Realtors and member brokers engaged in an "ongoing contract, combination or conspiracy" to restrain competition. U.S. District Judge Mark R. Filip rejected the Realtors' argument that the government had no case after the trade association in May 2005 changed the policy that limited online access to listings by customers of brokers who operate "virtual office Web sites."
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1999
The Maryland Bankers Association said yesterday that it has named Kathleen M. Murphy to head the statewide banking trade group.Murphy succeeds John B. Bowers Jr., who led the association for nearly 14 years, and resigned in June to take a job at Bank Compensation Strategies Group, a Minneapolis-based compensation and benefits consulting firm."
BUSINESS
By Andree Brooks and Andree Brooks,New York Times News Service | October 10, 1993
When satellite dish antennas first came on the market some 13 years ago they were large and ugly, like giant rice bowls sprouting in a greensward. So it was understandable that condominium and other homeowner associations tightly restricted their use.But too often the unit owners didn't care. According to the Satellite Broadcasting and Communications Association, the trade association for satellite dish reception based in Alexandria, Va., about 364,000 residential satellite systems were installed in 1992, twice as many as the 130,000 systems installed in 1982.
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | November 8, 1990
Talks between the International Longshoremen's Association and waterfront employers have resumed despite an ongoing disagreement over the composition of the union's bargaining committee.Separate sessions were held yesterday between the employers, represented by the Steamship Trade Association Inc., and ILA Local 953, which is seeking to bargain separately, and the port's four other locals that are still bargaining as a group. More meetings were planned for today.Traditionally, the port's ILA locals negotiate their contracts as a group and vote them up or down in a single vote of their port-wide membership.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | November 10, 1994
The Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors yesterday denied charges of racial discrimination and antitrust law violations leveled by a group of black real estate brokers and agents.Responding to a lawsuit filed Friday, board President David W. Baird countered that the trade association offers membership to all licensed real estate brokers and agents in the state and actively encourages minorities to join.In a suit in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Real Estate Brokers of Baltimore Inc. accused the board of monopolizing real estate sales and discriminating against black real estate brokers, agents and sellers by limiting access to electronic home-sales listings.
NEWS
August 9, 2006
Tai Sophia's Snow given new post James Snow, a faculty member at Tai Sophia Institute in the herbal medicine program, has been appointed director of the master in science degree program. Snow assisted the program's first director, Simon Mills, in developing the first graduate-level degree program in herbal medicine in the United States. Mills will continue to teach in the program. Printing association appoints Walker Kyle Walker, president of E.H. Walker Supply Co. Inc. in Rockville, has been named chairman of the Printing and Graphics Association MidAtlantic, a Columbia-based printers trade association representing printing and graphics firms in Maryland, Virginia, Washington and Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
February 29, 1996
Maurice C. Byan, president of the Steamship Trade Association, was named port leader of the year yesterday by the Baltimore Junior Association of Commerce at its 26th annual luncheon honoring a maritime leader.Mr. Byan has headed the association, which represents 36 port employers, including major stevedore and steamship companies, since 1990. He has helped negotiate labor agreements with the International Longshoremen's Association, and has been instrumental in establishing training and quality-improvement programs with the union.
NEWS
August 9, 2006
Tai Sophia's Snow given new post James Snow, a faculty member at Tai Sophia Institute in the herbal medicine program, has been appointed director of the master in science degree program. Snow assisted the program's first director, Simon Mills, in developing the first graduate-level degree program in herbal medicine in the United States. Mills will continue to teach in the program. Printing association appoints Walker Kyle Walker, president of E.H. Walker Supply Co. Inc. in Rockville, has been named chairman of the Printing and Graphics Association MidAtlantic, a Columbia-based printers trade association representing printing and graphics firms in Maryland, Virginia, Washington and Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2003
Health insurance is a highly regulated industry, but state officials who oversee the industry have bumped up against a powerful entity they can't regulate - the national Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. In Maryland and North Carolina, regulators and legislators have been stymied at times in trying to deal with the local Blue Cross Blue Shield entity when the national association has threatened to pull its trademark and threaten the viability of the local insurer. "If there's a novel issue rising out of what happened in Maryland, it's the role of the association and the power that they have," said Steven B. Larsen, the former Maryland insurance commissioner whose scathing report halted CareFirst, the Blue Cross plan in Maryland, from converting to a for-profit company from nonprofit.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2001
For 363 days of the year, the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association is out to prove it's better than the competition. But for the past two days here, the association and 37 others from across the country have set aside their competitive natures and shared ideas, information and tips as part of the first-ever organized meeting for the visitor-service industry. "On a day-to-day basis, we all want to be better than the next bureau, or the next city," said Dan M. Lincoln, vice president of tourism and communications with the Baltimore Convention and Visitors Association.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2000
The proposed split of Constellation Energy Group Inc. all but ensures that Maryland's residential customers won't have a choice when it comes to choosing their power supplier, according to two industry trade groups. Customers will continue calling Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. for service, power outages and complaints. But more importantly, customers will continue purchasing their electricity from BGE and pay millions of dollars in "stranded costs" to BGE, or money the utility spent building power plants that it had to sell when electricity restructuring started in the state.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 30, 1999
WASHINGTON -- American steelmakers, who often complain that foreign-government subsidies give an unfair advantage to steel companies in South Korea, Japan and elsewhere, receive similar assistance themselves in billions in state and federal aid, an industry group said yesterday.U.S. plants such as Bethlehem Steel's Sparrows Point mill in Baltimore County get substantial federal tax breaks and state economic development assistance, said the American Institute for International Steel, a Washington-based trade association of importers and other distributors.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1999
The Maryland Bankers Association said yesterday that it has named Kathleen M. Murphy to head the statewide banking trade group.Murphy succeeds John B. Bowers Jr., who led the association for nearly 14 years, and resigned in June to take a job at Bank Compensation Strategies Group, a Minneapolis-based compensation and benefits consulting firm."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | November 29, 2006
The National Association of Realtors lost a bid to dismiss a U.S. government antitrust lawsuit challenging its limits on access to multiple listings by consumers who use lower-cost Internet brokers. The ruling by a federal judge in Chicago lets the Justice Department proceed to pretrial fact-finding to try to prove that the Realtors and member brokers engaged in an "ongoing contract, combination or conspiracy" to restrain competition. U.S. District Judge Mark R. Filip rejected the Realtors' argument that the government had no case after the trade association in May 2005 changed the policy that limited online access to listings by customers of brokers who operate "virtual office Web sites."
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | October 31, 1990
The focus of longshoremen's contract talks now returns to Baltimore, where bargainers have until Nov. 30 to achieve an agreement to augment a national pact settled yesterday in Miami Beach, Fla.Local delegations for both management and the International Longshoremen's Association returned to Baltimore today, where talks could resume again shortly. The national, or master, contract affects issues common to the 36 ILA ports from Maine to Texas."It's good news that we have a contract," said David Bindler, chairman of the local management committee, the Steamship Trade Association, and regional head of Maersk Inc., a major ship line at the port.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1998
The nation will need 150,000 more electricians by the turn of the century, and welfare recipients need jobs.That makes for a perfect combination of supply and demand, according to Independent Electrical Contractors, a national trade association with a chapter in Odenton.I.E.C. Chesapeake is opening a training building in Odenton and wants to fill it with area welfare recipients willing to become electrician apprentices."Each week in the Sunday employment section, there's about 10 to 20 companies that are hiring electricians," said Grant Shmelzer, executive director of I.E.C.
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