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By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2001
State biologists have stepped up monitoring at two sites, one in Baltimore City and one in Somerset County, where sick or distressed fish and traces of Pfiesteria have recently been found together. In both cases, tests showed Pfiesteria at very low levels, and there was no proof of a toxic outbreak, said officials at the Department of Natural Resources. The first incident occurred Aug. 6, when employees of the state Department of the Environment noticed fish swimming erratically in Colgate Creek, which flows past the agency's parking lot and into the Patapsco River in the city.
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NEWS
July 5, 2014
As the Middle East continues to burn in high gear in the midst of much killing and destruction occurring in all of the countries there, it makes me feel very downcast as I have also been reviewing these disturbing accounts in 23 different newspaper articles including in The Baltimore Sun ( "Walking a fine line on Iraq," July 1). In Iraq, civil strife is in high gear among the various sects, particularly Prime Minister Nouri al-Malaki's Shiite Muslims and a terrorist splinter group called The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 7, 2001
For the second time in less than a year, St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson has suspended showers for patients and started using bottled water after a routine monthly check showed traces of the bacteria that cause Legionnaires' disease. Spokeswoman Linda Harder said the elevated levels of Legionella may be the result of the new, state-of-the art water treatment system the hospital has started using, but said the medical center has decided to err on the side of caution until officials receive the results from a second round of tests.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
For every gunshot report taken by Baltimore police, there could be four more they haven't heard about, according to the company behind a high-tech system that city officials hope will help curb the illegal use of firearms. ShotSpotter, which recognizes the sound of gunfire and alerts police, analyzed its data from 48 cities, covering 165 square miles, and found people called 911 to report shots fired in fewer than 1 in 5 events where the system confirmed the discharging of a gun. "We're showing the real inconvenient truth of gun violence, in that it happens more frequently than people are aware," said Ralph Clark, the CEO of SST Inc., which manufactures ShotSpotter.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | January 30, 1995
FREDERICK -- Preliminary analyses of soil from test trenches in a Fort Detrick landfill thought to be the main source of toxins tainting nearby wells reveal no traces of the expected chemicals, Army officials say.During recent excavation of Pit 11, a trench where acids, solvents and chemicals likely were buried decades ago, Army and state officials were puzzled to find only normal refuse -- household waste, newspapers, burned timbers and soda cans.They...
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | September 13, 1992
The Harford County Health Department sought to assure residents of the Beechwood Lane community that their well water is safe, despite test results that found six of seven wells contained trace amounts of chloroform.The department is collecting information from residents who have complained that at least six of their neighbors have cancer, which they feared could be traced to contaminated water after learning that one well in the neighborhood contained traces of a gasoline additive."There is no reason to panic," said Woody Williams, a supervising sanitarian with the Harford County Health Department.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Jay Apperson and Nancy A. Youssef and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2000
A state autopsy has concluded that police shot Joseph C. Palczynski 27 times the night they stormed the Dundalk apartment where he had been holding three hostages. The 23-page report, issued by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, found that Palczynski was killed by 23 "penetrating" gunshot wounds. He was grazed by four other bullets. Palczynski, a 31-year-old unemployed electrician, had been holding three hostages -- his ex-girlfriend's mother, the mother's boyfriend and the couple's 12-year-old son -- for four days before he was fatally shot.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1997
Air monitoring after Tuesday's explosion of seven chemical rounds at Aberdeen Proving Ground found trace amounts of a nerve agent, but not enough to halt detonations scheduled for today, officials said.Col. Roslyn M. Glantz, deputy installation commander at the proving ground, said 48 sensitive monitors near the detonation site displayed low levels of the nerve agent Tabun on Tuesday. Hand-held monitors did not pick up traces of the agent, she said.Only three of the monitors detected traces after overnight testing, and monitors placed in homes five miles away in Kent County showed no presence of the agent, Glantz said.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Jonathan Bor and Tom Pelton and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2001
Anthrax struck at yet another government institution in Washington yesterday, prompting the Supreme Court to close even as health officials continued to overhaul their strategy for responding to the widening threat posed by the deadly bacteria. The nation's highest court closed about noon, and employees were offered tests and antibiotics after anthrax was found on a filter at its mail warehouse in Forestville, Prince George's County. Investigators did not detect any bacteria in the court building.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2004
The number of wells in the Upper Crossroads section of Harford County with traces of a potentially cancer-causing chemical continues to grow, according to the Maryland Department of the Environment. The state reported Friday that about 150 wells have been tested. Richard McIntire, a spokesman for the department, said results are back on 64 of those. Of that number, he said, 34 properties have traces of MTBE -- methyl tertiary butyl ether -- in their water. He said seven properties exceed the level that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recommends as safe.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
When Samuel Smith, major general of the Maryland militia, needed a headquarters to plot Baltimore's defense from British invaders in the summer of 1814, archaeologists believe he called on the owner of a shop that gives Butcher's Hill its name. Jacob Laudenslager leased much of what is Patterson Park today from landowner William Patterson, including a butcher's shop steps from where the park's iconic pagoda sits today. Archaeologists have uncovered a wall of that structure as they embark on a dig for a better understanding of what happened when thousands of militiamen camped along the hills of southeast Baltimore during the War of 1812.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
When the Irish-born novelist Colum McCann sits before a blank page, he launches himself into a vast, empty space. He's surrounded by fog on all sides, so he can't tell if his vehicle is right side up or upside down. The craft he's maneuvering is clunky, and the throttle sticks. No wonder the National Book Award-winning author felt compelled to write "TransAtlantic" about three fraught, historic journeys to Ireland in the 19th and 20th centuries. The first chronicles aviators John Alcock and Arthur Whitten Brown, who in June 1919 made the first nonstop flight across the Atlantic Ocean.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
After mediocre campaigns in six of the last seven years, the Navy men's soccer team is enjoying considerable success this fall. The Midshipmen are 9-3-2 overall and 5-0-0 in the Patriot League. They are 5-0-0 in the conference for the first time in school history, are tied with Army for first place in the league and need only to beat Holy Cross (6-5-1, 4-1-0) Saturday night to clinch their second berth in the last three Patriot League tournaments. "This is my fifth fall, and this has been a good team the last couple years," coach Dave Brandt said as the team traveled Friday morning to Worcester, Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
Because the Baltimore-area novelist Alice McDermott possesses a painterly eye that delights in the way things look and sound and smell and taste, it can be easy to miss her underlying focus. For the National Book Award-winning author, each small sensory jolt that originates in this world is a gateway to a more incorporeal realm. "Marie takes a spiritual journey in this novel," McDermott says of the heroine of her newly released book, "Someone: A Novel. " "She goes from not understanding at all to not quite understanding to understanding a little bit. Early in the book, her brother makes an absolutely outrageous proposition from the Gospel of Matthew, that all the hairs on our heads are counted and that we're not alone.
SPORTS
By Ellen Fishel, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
Henry Stansbury is pure Maryland. His family has been here since the 1650s. He grew up in Mount Washington, played lacrosse for the Terps in the early 1960s and now splits his time between his houses in Catonsville and on the Eastern Shore. And his love for the state and its history also led him to one of his greatest passions - decoy collecting. Hand-carved decoys, once used for waterfowl hunting and now appreciated as art, have a rich history in the Chesapeake Bay region.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
If there's one work that economically and poetically encapsulates the theme of the new exhibit "Ashe to Amen," it's a black-and-white photograph of a well-thumbed Bible, flipped open and lying atop an African drum. The 1989 gelatin print by Chester Higgins Jr., part of the exhibit on display through Sept. 29 at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture, explores in one deceptively simple shot how African culture clashes and commingles with Christian traditions.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2004
Maryland ranks fifth in the nation in the number of stores selling guns later used in crimes or found in the hands of criminals, according to a new report from an advocacy group. The report, prepared by the Washington-based Americans for Gun Safety Foundation, calls for federal agencies to step up investigation and prosecution of what the organization considers corrupt stores. "Selling Crime: High Crime Gun Stores Fuel Criminals" lists stores by name, ranking them by the number of guns sold that went on to be linked by authorities to a criminal investigation.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2003
FREDERICK -- On a grassy rise just west of Route 355-- once the main wagon road between Frederick and Georgetown -- archaeologists are probing the earth for traces of what may be the largest slave "village" ever uncovered in Maryland. If they're right about the spot, as many as 90 African-Americans lived and worked in a row of wooden houses set on this low hill 200 years ago. They were enslaved to help work a 748-acre plantation founded in 1795 by Payen Boisneuf, a Frenchman who had fled a slave revolt in Haiti.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
Johns Hopkins epidemiologist Dr. Trish Perl traveled halfway around the world last month to trace the outbreak of a deadly SARS-like disease in Saudi Arabia that's spreading. She and two colleagues pored over hospital records, tracking the spread of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, just as they did with a SARS outbreak in Toronto nearly a decade earlier. The researchers "were looking for any crossover to explain how one person gave it to another," Perl said. They traced a web of infection linking a man and his son to nearly two dozen others who had tended to the sick, visited the same health care facilities or were in adjacent hospital beds.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 12, 2013
As a reminder of just how persistent some toxic chemicals can be, a Johns Hopkins-led research team reports finding traces of long-banned DDT and PCBs along with other contaminants in the blood of 50 pregnant women checked from Baltimore and its suburbs.  In a study posted online by the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology , the scientists say they detected more frequent and vigorous fetal movements in the wombs of...
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