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By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | December 17, 1994
The possibility remains that many of the nation's jockeys will ++ stage a walkout Jan. 1 at most of the country's racetracks.In New York yesterday, The Jockeys' Guild failed to reach an agreement with the Thoroughbred Racing Associations on how much the TRA should pay into a fund that finances the riders' benefits package.The guild turned down what the TRA, which represents most of the nation's racetracks, had described as its "best and final offer" by a 5 p.m. deadline yesterday. The contract between the two expires Dec. 31.However, the TRA is keeping its offer on the table and has agreed to extend discussions while the jockeys study alternative ways to raise the money.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
Sometimes, Laurie Berkner scours the New York area in search of inspiration for her next children's sing-a-long, but there's not a "tra la la" moment to be found. Occasionally, however, the woman dubbed one of the pioneers of the kiddie rock movement finds herself at just the right place, at just the right time. Such as a few years ago, she says, when "I went around the Upper West Side, and walking along Broadway, hoping to hear kids say something that I could write a song off of, and I saw this kid playing with her father.
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SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | December 22, 1994
Racetracks across the country, including Laurel Park, have vowed to conduct full racing cards on Jan. 1, whether or not there is a jockeys' walkout, officials of the Thoroughbred Racing Associations said yesterday.Chris Scherf, executive vice president of the TRA, which represents most major tracks, said he has contacted about a dozen of the organization's member tracks that are racing that day "and all of them are convinced that they will be able to run their regular cards. Their message to horsemen is: 'Get the jockeys and we'll be open.
FEATURES
By Maria Elena Fernandez and Maria Elena Fernandez,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 3, 2008
HOLLYWOOD - A seat on the "Hot Tamale Train" is no longer the benchmark of success on So You Think You Can Dance. There now is a more coveted ranking, a sweeter place known as the "Tra La La," and, yes, only judge Mary Murphy can explain what that means. She coined it last month, inspired by a Broadway routine performed flawlessly by hip-hop dancer Joshua Allen and his contemporary partner, Katee Shean, during Fox's multidiscipline dance competition for aspiring performers. After the performance, Murphy screamed in her usual jubilant, uninhibited, practically deranged manner.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | September 26, 1993
The search apparently has been narrowed to two candidates -- one with a background in racing and one with television expertise -- to be named the first so-called national "czar of racing."The board of directors of the Thoroughbred Racing Associations, which represents the bulk of North American thoroughbred tracks, voted at its quarterly meeting in Toronto last week to hire a paid president to assume a commissioner-type role.The TRA's first commissioner of racing is expected be hired by the Nov. 6 Breeders' Cup.The idea is to reorganize the TRA, comprised of 42 tracks including all the major ones in the United States and Canada, and give it a more activist role "so that we'll have a league office staffed with full-time professionals instead of a lot of the work being done by volunteer track owners, who have their own businesses to run," said Pimlico/Laurel operator and TRA director Joe De Francis.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 31, 1991
LAUREL -- Threat of a jockeys walkout tomorrow at Laurel Race Course and other racetracks throughout the United States and Canada ended last night after a daylong conference among representatives of the Thoroughbred Racing Association and the Jockeys' Guild.Although no new contract was signed, sources said an agreement was imminent and a work stoppage would be averted. Mickey Solomone, East region manager for the Guild, said last night: "The riders are going to name on horses for Wednesday.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | October 4, 1992
Betting decreased more than $100,000 on the last leg of the three-part National Pic-6, but officials of the Thoroughbred Racing Associations said yesterday they are still "pleased and proud" of the experiment.Bob Bork, president of the TRA and general manager of Arlington International Racecourse, said he was not surprised at the wagering decline.Betting was off 12.9 percent yesterday from the second leg of the Pic-6 on Sept. 26."The stakes we presented in the second leg were all $100,000 in value and Maryland Million Day at Pimlico helped increase the Pic-6 handle through their [six]
BUSINESS
July 20, 1996
The Reeves Agency said yesterday that it has volunteered to provide marketing communications services for Downtown Partnership of Baltimore's "Street Smarts" public education campaign."
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | December 21, 1994
Sources in the Jockeys Guild said last night that a nationwide walkout on Jan. 1 has become a real possibility and that riders are being alerted to prepare for it."Obviously, they [the track owners] don't want to work with us in good faith and there certainly appears that there is going to be a walkout," said Jimmy Edwards, local manager for the guild at the Middle Atlantic tracks. "I've never seen the riders more unified."Yesterday, track owners rejected the jockeys' two latest proposals and said that when their current three-year contract with the riders is up Dec. 31, they no longer will feel any responsibility to pay the jockeys for their media rights.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Evening Sun Staff | December 30, 1991
Track operator Joe De Francis vowed yesterday that Laurel will race on Wednesday despite a threatened New Year's Day strike by jockeys.The riders, who are members of the Jockeys' Guild, are in the midst of a contract dispute with the Thoroughbred Racing Associations, representing about 55 tracks nationwide, including Laurel.When the Laurel entries were drawn for Wednesday, no jockeys were named on any of the 103 horses on the 11-race holiday card."That's because none of our jockeys are going to ride, unless they have a signed contract," said MickeySolomone, regional manager of the Guild, who was at Laurel yesterday.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1996
The Reeves Agency said yesterday that it has volunteered to provide marketing communications services for Downtown Partnership of Baltimore's "Street Smarts" public education campaign."
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | December 31, 1994
A proposed nationwide jockeys walkout was averted last night, just hours before final riding assignments are to be made at many racetracks this morning for tomorrow's card, the day of the threatened job action.According to a statement released by the Thoroughbred Racing Associations, which represents the majority of the country's track owners, the TRA and the Jockeys' Guild reached an agreement in principle that extends the current contract between the two groups for another three years. That contract was due to expire today.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | December 23, 1994
With talks stalled, a lull settled over negotiations yesterday in the track owners-jockeys dispute that could lead to a nationwide walkout by the riders Jan. 1.Each side has rejected the other's last offer. Right now, there is no initiative planned by either side to jump-start the discussions and there are no fresh ideas being espoused. The current contract between the two groups expires Dec. 31.The Thoroughbred Racing Associations, which represents the track owners, says the next move is up to the jockeys.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | December 22, 1994
Racetracks across the country, including Laurel Park, have vowed to conduct full racing cards on Jan. 1, whether or not there is a jockeys' walkout, officials of the Thoroughbred Racing Associations said yesterday.Chris Scherf, executive vice president of the TRA, which represents most major tracks, said he has contacted about a dozen of the organization's member tracks that are racing that day "and all of them are convinced that they will be able to run their regular cards. Their message to horsemen is: 'Get the jockeys and we'll be open.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | December 21, 1994
Sources in the Jockeys Guild said last night that a nationwide walkout on Jan. 1 has become a real possibility and that riders are being alerted to prepare for it."Obviously, they [the track owners] don't want to work with us in good faith and there certainly appears that there is going to be a walkout," said Jimmy Edwards, local manager for the guild at the Middle Atlantic tracks. "I've never seen the riders more unified."Yesterday, track owners rejected the jockeys' two latest proposals and said that when their current three-year contract with the riders is up Dec. 31, they no longer will feel any responsibility to pay the jockeys for their media rights.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | December 17, 1994
The possibility remains that many of the nation's jockeys will ++ stage a walkout Jan. 1 at most of the country's racetracks.In New York yesterday, The Jockeys' Guild failed to reach an agreement with the Thoroughbred Racing Associations on how much the TRA should pay into a fund that finances the riders' benefits package.The guild turned down what the TRA, which represents most of the nation's racetracks, had described as its "best and final offer" by a 5 p.m. deadline yesterday. The contract between the two expires Dec. 31.However, the TRA is keeping its offer on the table and has agreed to extend discussions while the jockeys study alternative ways to raise the money.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Evening Sun Staff | June 19, 1991
FAIR HILL -- In less than two weeks, the nation's most involved in thoroughbred racing will be located in Maryland.By July 1, the Thoroughbred Racing Associations, an organization representing 58 North American racetracks, and its subsidiary, the Thoroughbred Racing and Protective Bureau, is expected to be open for business at its new headquarters at the Fair Hill race course near Elkton.When the facility opens, it will culminate a two-year effort by state and local racing officials, including the late Frank De Francis, not only to attract the national organization to Maryland, but to house it in a brand new $1.3 million building.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | December 23, 1994
With talks stalled, a lull settled over negotiations yesterday in the track owners-jockeys dispute that could lead to a nationwide walkout by the riders Jan. 1.Each side has rejected the other's last offer. Right now, there is no initiative planned by either side to jump-start the discussions and there are no fresh ideas being espoused. The current contract between the two groups expires Dec. 31.The Thoroughbred Racing Associations, which represents the track owners, says the next move is up to the jockeys.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | September 26, 1993
The search apparently has been narrowed to two candidates -- one with a background in racing and one with television expertise -- to be named the first so-called national "czar of racing."The board of directors of the Thoroughbred Racing Associations, which represents the bulk of North American thoroughbred tracks, voted at its quarterly meeting in Toronto last week to hire a paid president to assume a commissioner-type role.The TRA's first commissioner of racing is expected be hired by the Nov. 6 Breeders' Cup.The idea is to reorganize the TRA, comprised of 42 tracks including all the major ones in the United States and Canada, and give it a more activist role "so that we'll have a league office staffed with full-time professionals instead of a lot of the work being done by volunteer track owners, who have their own businesses to run," said Pimlico/Laurel operator and TRA director Joe De Francis.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | September 19, 1993
No one should be able to accuse the Virginia Racing Commission of operating behind closed doors over the next six months while it decides what lucky party will be allowed to build and operate the Old Dominion's first pari-mutuel racetrack.The process promises to be something of a public spectacle.The board's executive director, Don Price, said that as soon as licensing applications are received (on Oct. 1), they will immediately be made available for public scrutiny.The commission is currently a kind of mom-and-pop operation.
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