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NEWS
May 11, 2003
On May 1, 2003; Harry T. R. Visitation at 2140 NM. Fulton Avenue on Friday 20 to 8 PM. The family will receive friends at the City Temple of Baltimore, 317 Dolphin Street on Saturday 9:30 AM.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2005
T. Rowe Price Associates will continue managing Maryland's college savings plan for at least another seven years after agreeing to cut some of the fees paid by participants, plan officials said yesterday. The Baltimore-based investment company outbid four competitors for the contract to manage the Maryland College Investment Plan. The other bidders were TIAA-CREF and OppenheimerFunds, both based in New York; Union Bank & Trust Co. in Nebraska; and Massachusetts-based Upromise, which is affiliated with the Vanguard Group.
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NEWS
By George F. Will | October 7, 1996
WASHINGTON -- He was "a steam engine in trousers," this Harvard-educated patrician cowboy from Manhattan who galloped into the Dakota Badlands wearing spurs and a pearl-handled revolver, and charged up San Juan Hill in a uniform from Brooks Brothers.He was the first president born in a big city, and the first known to the nation as an intimate -- by his initials. The toothy grin that crinkled his entire face masked an unassuageable grief that he kept at bay only by living life as "one long campaign."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2005
Gary Klein loves and loathes his classic car. He devotes half his garage, hours of free time and a good chunk of change to his yellow convertible 1975 TR6. It's British, and it's his little metal baby. The car's design - the straight lines and the boxy shell - drew him in. That's his favorite part of the car. "It's the shape," Klein said. "It's been described as a man's car, and I guess I must have fallen into that trap. It attracted me." After restoring it, Klein reached out to other British-car owners in the area.
NEWS
By Joan Whitson Wallace | November 4, 1990
The wind whipped against my skirt as I hurried to the restaurant. This week had been grueling.I craved the peacefulness of a solitary lunch. I could relate to Greta Garbo's famous line, "I want to be alone." Perhaps that's why I ordered the Greta Garbo sandwich ($3.75) from the menu.Or perhaps I ordered it because it sounded so enticing: chicken salad, bacon, Swiss cheese, lettuce, tomato and mayo. I specified pumpernickel bread.The day was so brisk I had to have something warm, like soup.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | October 5, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The 31st was held in 1908. President Theodore Roosevelt chose to treat his seven and half years in office (obtaining it when William McKinley was slain) as two terms and declined to run. He favored William Howard Taft, his secretary of war, who was easily nominated.The Democrats, who had tried a conservative in 1904, after losing twice with William Jennings Bryan, went back to Bryan.Both candidates claimed to be logical successors to TR: Taft as his hand-picked choice, Bryan as an advocate of liberal policies similar to TR's progressivism.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | October 6, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The 32nd was held in 1912. For the first time, preferential primaries were a feature of presidential elections. Progressive Republicans, upset with the conservatism of President William Howard Taft, urged former President Theodore Roosevelt to challenge his protege.TR was eager to. He won nine state primaries to Taft's one, but the incumbent president controlled the party regulars and was easily nominated at the tightly controlled convention. Later TR was nominated as the candidate of the Progressive Party.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Theo Lippman Jr. and By Theo Lippman Jr.,Special to the Sun | March 4, 2001
"The Three Roosevelts," by James MacGregor Burns and Susan Dunn. Atlantic Monthly Press. 678 pages. $37.50. In an era of Bushes, Kennedys and Clintons, here's the gold standard. Theodore, Franklin D. and Eleanor Roosevelt -- two presidents and a first lady -- defined the liberal, humanitarian goals and political successes of the 20th century. The literature about them is vast, and there is nothing new in this group biography, but it is more than just an introduction to their vibrant lives for new readers.
NEWS
April 19, 2005
On April 16, 2005, TERRI LYNN, devoted mother of Raymond Thomas Kaline an TR Samuel Kaline, loving sister of Paul Shaffer, III, david Bruce Shaffer, Wendy Kaline, John William Shaffer and Irene Farmer. Also survived by nieces and nephews, especially loved by Mike Crocetti Friends may call at the CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK, P.A., 7110 Sollers Point Rd., on Wednesday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services will be held Wednesday at 8 P.M.
NEWS
By David M. Shribman | February 15, 2000
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- He is the poster boy of Republican presidential candidates. He was the youngest American president, maybe the most inventive, surely the most vigorous. But he was a different kind of conservative, and a different kind of Republican, than the caricature John McCain is presenting. Theodore Roosevelt was an exceptional Republican president, but he was also an exception among Republican presidents. Like his GOP brethren, he looked askance at waste in government. Like his Republican successors, he believed business was the engine of the economy.
NEWS
April 19, 2005
On April 16, 2005, TERRI LYNN, devoted mother of Raymond Thomas Kaline an TR Samuel Kaline, loving sister of Paul Shaffer, III, david Bruce Shaffer, Wendy Kaline, John William Shaffer and Irene Farmer. Also survived by nieces and nephews, especially loved by Mike Crocetti Friends may call at the CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK, P.A., 7110 Sollers Point Rd., on Wednesday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services will be held Wednesday at 8 P.M.
NEWS
May 11, 2003
On May 1, 2003; Harry T. R. Visitation at 2140 NM. Fulton Avenue on Friday 20 to 8 PM. The family will receive friends at the City Temple of Baltimore, 317 Dolphin Street on Saturday 9:30 AM.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 2003
ABOARD THE USS THEODORE ROOSEVELT, Eastern Mediterranean - A breeze is blowing at 3 knots off the port bow, a black-and-yellow screen on the bridge indicates. The aircraft carrier, doing 14 knots in the hazy sea, is positioning itself to launch a wave of 13 fighter jets on a training mission. An officer orders an adjustment in the direction of the aircraft carrier. "Left five degree rudder," he says. "Left five degree rudder, aye, sir," the helmsman replies. Five stories below, on the flight deck, helmeted crews dressed in red, yellow, green and purple shirts are making last-minute checks to the aircraft.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Theo Lippman Jr. and By Theo Lippman Jr.,Special to the Sun | March 4, 2001
"The Three Roosevelts," by James MacGregor Burns and Susan Dunn. Atlantic Monthly Press. 678 pages. $37.50. In an era of Bushes, Kennedys and Clintons, here's the gold standard. Theodore, Franklin D. and Eleanor Roosevelt -- two presidents and a first lady -- defined the liberal, humanitarian goals and political successes of the 20th century. The literature about them is vast, and there is nothing new in this group biography, but it is more than just an introduction to their vibrant lives for new readers.
TOPIC
By David Jackson | October 8, 2000
A CENTURY AFTER Theodore Roosevelt talked about "trust busting" and "the sinister influence" of special interests, Al Gore is trying to profit from TR-style politics. The Democratic presidential candidate calls it "fighting for the people against the powerful," a refrain Republicans mock as musty old class warfare. Some pollsters said it helped Gore catch Republican opponent George W. Bush. Gore agrees, after bashing "big oil," the "big drug companies," the insurance industry and health maintenance organizations - not to mention their alleged benefactor, Bush.
NEWS
By Mark Ribbing and Jacques Kelly and Mark Ribbing and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2000
Kermit Roosevelt, a grandson of President Theodore Roosevelt and a key player in the 1953 coup that restored the shah of Iran to power, died of a stroke Thursday at Broadmead, a Cockeysville retirement community where he had lived for the past four years. He was 84. Mr. Roosevelt, who lived in Washington from 1943 to 1996, was teaching history at Harvard University when he joined the intelligence-gathering effort during World War II. He later served in the Central Intelligence Agency during its formative years in the 1940s and 1950s.
NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne and Joseph R. L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 28, 1997
"TR: The Last Romantic," by H. W. Brands, Basic Books/Harper Collins. 912 pages, $35. Does he really belong up there on Mount Rushmore? Up there with Washington and Lincoln, whom he revered, and Thomas Jefferson, whom he despised? Up there where cousin Franklin would be a more appropriate great face carved into Dakota granite, according to historians who consistently rate Theodore Roosevelt only a "near great"?With the centennials of the Spanish-American War, the triumph of TR and his Rough Riders at San Juan Hill and his accession to the presidency almost upon us, H.W. Brands' excellent new biography opens up a new period of retrospection on one of the most colorful politicians this nation has ever produced.
NEWS
By MICHELLE HOFFMAN | October 28, 1993
A dark figure rests in a high-back chair just inside the living room door, sitting alone in the dark. But when the light is turned on, the figure vanishes and the chair is empty. The only exit is the doorway in which you are standing.There is a reflection in the window of a tall, slender man dressed in blue. He is standing behind you, close enough to touch, and is watching as you paint the outside window frames. Jerking around to face him, you see no one, only the hip-high white porch railing.
NEWS
By David M. Shribman | February 15, 2000
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- He is the poster boy of Republican presidential candidates. He was the youngest American president, maybe the most inventive, surely the most vigorous. But he was a different kind of conservative, and a different kind of Republican, than the caricature John McCain is presenting. Theodore Roosevelt was an exceptional Republican president, but he was also an exception among Republican presidents. Like his GOP brethren, he looked askance at waste in government. Like his Republican successors, he believed business was the engine of the economy.
FEATURES
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and Joseph R.L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 20, 1998
"The Lion's Pride: Theodore Roosevelt and His Family in Peace and War," by Edward J. Renehan Jr. Oxford University Press. 271 pages. $30.Theodore Roosevelt flung himself into fatherhood with the same gusto that he grasped, hugged and exulted in all the wonders of life. He was hero, companion and daunting role model to his six children, leading them on many a point-to-point hike where one could go over or under, but never around, any obstacle. His fierce patriotism and eagerness to risk death in battle, as exemplified by his daredevil charge up San Juan Hill, became a family as well as a national legend.
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