Advertisement
HomeCollectionsToy Store
IN THE NEWS

Toy Store

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2010
A drop in donations and an increase in requests are playing havoc with the Baltimore County Department of Social Services' annual free toy store for the needy. The event, which kicks off Monday for two days in Essex and then moves to Woodlawn and Reisterstown, offers parents a chance to select items on their children's wish lists. They can meander through the aisles and fill their carts with new, free toys. But unless donations pick up, the shelves will be vacant long before the last shoppers arrive.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2010
There may not be a hot toy craze that has parents fighting in the aisles this holiday season, but that's not stopping retailers from going after the market more aggressively than ever. Retailers are filling their shelves with traditional toys such as board games, building sets and dolls — and not just electronics — an expansion that comes after a tumultuous period in the industry that saw a decline in sales, intense price competition, bankruptcies and the death of the once-top competitor KB Toys.
Advertisement
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2009
Every December, Baltimore County's Department of Social Services converts a large supply closet into a toy store. Shoppers can bring their lists but won't need their wallets. All the dolls, Tonka trucks, trains, storybooks and games have been donated by businesses, community organizations, schools and individuals. About 15,000 toys will be given to needy families throughout the county by close of business Wednesday. "We have more than 1,000 donors, and 100 percent of the donations go directly to our clients," said Deborah S. Ward, director of the volunteer services division, who gets to play Santa Claus.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2010
A drop in donations and an increase in requests are playing havoc with the Baltimore County Department of Social Services' annual free toy store for the needy. The event, which kicks off Monday for two days in Essex and then moves to Woodlawn and Reisterstown, offers parents a chance to select items on their children's wish lists. They can meander through the aisles and fill their carts with new, free toys. But unless donations pick up, the shelves will be vacant long before the last shoppers arrive.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | November 1, 1994
Believe the stories your elders pass down.Do not doubt the truths of the senior generations. I once doubted a story I had heard as a child but disregarded as being just a corrupted version of the real thing.As a child in the 1950s, I listened to my family members praise the fabulous toy stores that Baltimore had. My father related the fall arrival of the new Lionel trains and colorful catalogs at French's on Baltimore Street near the Arena. My mother gushed about a little emporium called the Party Shop on West Saratoga Street near Park Avenue.
NEWS
By Janet Gramza and Janet Gramza,The Stamford Advocate | December 10, 1990
STAMFORD, Conn. -- A national toy-store chain has pulled Disney's "Steve the Tramp" doll from its shelves after a dozen homeless people and their advocates picketed outside a mall here last week.The group gathered at the Stamford Town Center to protest the sale of the toy because they said that it degraded the homeless."Steve the Tramp" is a "Dick Tracy action figure" whose package describes him as an "ignorant bum . . . dirty and scarred from a life on the streets. You'll smell him before you see him."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | December 20, 2009
Every December, Baltimore County's Department of Social Services converts a large supply closet into a toy store. Shoppers can bring their lists but won't need their wallets. All the dolls, Tonka trucks, trains, storybooks and games have been donated by businesses, community organizations, schools and individuals. About 15,000 toys will be given to needy families throughout the county by close of business Wednesday. "We have more than 1,000 donors, and 100 percent of the donations go directly to our clients," said Deborah S. Ward, director of the volunteer services division, who gets to play Santa Claus.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | April 15, 2001
From Beijing to your local cineplex, spies and espionage are big right now. Only one organization had the intelligence capabilities (not to mention James Bond-like luck) to see this coming: the toy industry. Been inside your neighborhood toy store lately? There's no shortage of spy-spawned toys on the shelf -- from micro-cameras and fingerprint kits to eavesdropping microphones and code books. Until a few months ago, they might have looked like charming anachronisms in the post-Cold War era. But that was before veteran FBI agent Robert Hanssen was accused of being a Russian spy, or 50 Russian diplomats were kicked out of the U.S., or a Navy surveillance plane with 24 Americans on board was held by the Chinese.
NEWS
By Jodi Bizar and Jodi Bizar,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 22, 1991
The scene at K & K Toys in Harford Mall was pandemonium.Screaming at the top of her lungs, one shopper demanded her money back while another shopper insisted on knowing why there were no Nerf bow-and-arrow sets left in stock.So went a typical day for toy-store employees, trying to handle the crush of Christmas shoppers seeking the latest hot toys from Barbie dolls to expensive computer games."Some shoppers are very impatient," said K & K Toys employee Chastity H. Arturi, of Bel Air."There are so many of them, I just have to bite my tongue, and whateverthey want I just give it to them.
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1998
Rookies. They think they know what to expect, but they don't. Not really.At 6 a.m. today, the doors will swing open at K-B Toys in the Marley Station Mall in Glen Burnie, and Cathy Alexander will learn that the phrase "the day after Thanksgiving is one of the busiest shopping days of the year" is actually a nice way of saying --ARRRGHHHH!!! Where did all these people come from? Say, Miss, does this need batteries? No, we don't have any Furbys in stock right now. Where's Scattergories? Crying children, frustrated parents, the endless sound of Christmas carols and ,, talking toys.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2010
Baltimore County police have arrested a Toys 'R' Us store manager and her boyfriend suspected of stealing money from a location at Security Square Mall in Woodlawn Saturday morning. Tamara Mickey, 34, and Matthew Domonick Wells, 31, both of Baltimore, were arrested Saturday and both charged with grand theft. Mickey faces an additional charge of false statement to a police officer, according to police. Mickey called Baltimore County Police to report a robbery at 8 a.m. Saturday.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | December 20, 2009
Every December, Baltimore County's Department of Social Services converts a large supply closet into a toy store. Shoppers can bring their lists but won't need their wallets. All the dolls, Tonka trucks, trains, storybooks and games have been donated by businesses, community organizations, schools and individuals. About 15,000 toys will be given to needy families throughout the county by close of business Wednesday. "We have more than 1,000 donors, and 100 percent of the donations go directly to our clients," said Deborah S. Ward, director of the volunteer services division, who gets to play Santa Claus.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2009
Every December, Baltimore County's Department of Social Services converts a large supply closet into a toy store. Shoppers can bring their lists but won't need their wallets. All the dolls, Tonka trucks, trains, storybooks and games have been donated by businesses, community organizations, schools and individuals. About 15,000 toys will be given to needy families throughout the county by close of business Wednesday. "We have more than 1,000 donors, and 100 percent of the donations go directly to our clients," said Deborah S. Ward, director of the volunteer services division, who gets to play Santa Claus.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | November 29, 2008
Two dead in shootout at California toy store PALM DESERT, Calif.: Two men pulled guns and shot each other to death in a crowded toy store yesterday after the women with them got into a bloody brawl, witnesses said. Scared shoppers fled but no one else was hurt. The violence erupted on Black Friday, the traditional post-Thanksgiving start of the holiday shopping surge, but authorities indicated the shooting wasn't related to a shopping frenzy. Riverside County sheriff's Sgt. Dennis Gutierrez said the fight was not over a toy. He said handguns were found by the men's bodies, but he released little other information.
NEWS
By JOANNA BRENNER | June 29, 2008
2576 Quarry Lake Drive, Pikesville 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday -- Friday; 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday 410-415-0000; amusetoys.com You won't find Monopoly or Jenga at aMuse Toys, but you will find a slew of other "creative, innovative, engaging and thoughtful toys" for everyone from newborn to adulthood, according to co-owner Claudia Towles. "We don't go with trends," she said. "Everything that's bought is bought with purpose." Claudia and her husband, Tom, opened their new store in Quarry Lake after their shop in Fells Point was flooded last year in April.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2004
The shoppers, shivering in 36-degree darkness, were already lining up outside the Toys "R" Us in Rosedale before 4 a.m. for the Day after Thanksgiving shopping madness, and sales associate Carlos McClain wasn't a bit nervous. After all, dealing with mobs of adults fighting over toys couldn't be any harder than mediating fights over toys among his own eight children. "I crave days like this," McClain said as he placed SALE signs on bicycles. "If it's not busy, it's not a good day." Shoppers kicked off the holiday shopping season before sunrise yesterday, forming long lines outside stores as they looked for bargains, filled a day off work or school, or just came to be part of the craziness.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | December 6, 2003
THE NEWS that the fabled F.A.O. Schwarz toy business has filed for bankruptcy, in the middle of the gift-giving season, makes me think of some of the champion toy givers in my life. As a child, I heard incessantly about the Schwarz house of toys, but not the one in New York near the Plaza Hotel. Ours was on Charles Street near the Woman's Industrial Exchange. What I remember came from my great-Aunt Cora, who before her marriage worked for the Western Maryland Railway in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2010
Baltimore County police have arrested a Toys 'R' Us store manager and her boyfriend suspected of stealing money from a location at Security Square Mall in Woodlawn Saturday morning. Tamara Mickey, 34, and Matthew Domonick Wells, 31, both of Baltimore, were arrested Saturday and both charged with grand theft. Mickey faces an additional charge of false statement to a police officer, according to police. Mickey called Baltimore County Police to report a robbery at 8 a.m. Saturday.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | December 6, 2003
THE NEWS that the fabled F.A.O. Schwarz toy business has filed for bankruptcy, in the middle of the gift-giving season, makes me think of some of the champion toy givers in my life. As a child, I heard incessantly about the Schwarz house of toys, but not the one in New York near the Plaza Hotel. Ours was on Charles Street near the Woman's Industrial Exchange. What I remember came from my great-Aunt Cora, who before her marriage worked for the Western Maryland Railway in downtown Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Randi F. Marshall and Randi F. Marshall,NEWSDAY | December 4, 2003
NEW YORK - When Gerry Horton was growing up on Long Island, he and his family made an annual pilgrimage into Manhattan during the holiday season. They'd walk down Fifth Avenue, stopping in many a shop and checking out Rockefeller Center. But one of the highlights would always be a stop at the FAO Schwarz flagship store on Fifth Avenue, Horton recalls. "This was always part of the tradition of coming to New York City on Christmas," Horton said. "It's a part of what you think of when you think of New York."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.