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By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2013
For weeks now, my 12-year-old son has been working on his Christmas wish list. The kid who seems never to be able to find information on the Internet when he's writing a school report can suddenly find all kinds of details about cellphones and sneakers. As parents, we're often torn between our wish to give our kids what they want and our judgment about whether those gifts might be harmful. A recent debate in California illustrates the point. In October, police in Sonoma County fatally shot a 13-year-old boy who was carrying a real-looking air gun. Now some lawmakers want to outlaw toy guns that look like real ones.
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FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2013
For weeks now, my 12-year-old son has been working on his Christmas wish list. The kid who seems never to be able to find information on the Internet when he's writing a school report can suddenly find all kinds of details about cellphones and sneakers. As parents, we're often torn between our wish to give our kids what they want and our judgment about whether those gifts might be harmful. A recent debate in California illustrates the point. In October, police in Sonoma County fatally shot a 13-year-old boy who was carrying a real-looking air gun. Now some lawmakers want to outlaw toy guns that look like real ones.
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NEWS
By Art Buchwald | May 9, 1991
ONCE AGAIN I know you'll think that I made this up -- but I didn't. It was in the newspapers.The U.S. Customs Service has banned the importation of toy M-16 rifles because they look so much like the real thing. Apparently, as far as the government is concerned, some authentic guns are not as much a threat to the citizenry as toy ones.The reason behind the ban is that the fake M-16 looks so real that police can't tell the difference. Officers have been shooting people carrying the toys. Also, fake guns are being used more and more in "armed" robberies by criminals who can't afford a real gun.Clyde Heston, president of the National Toy Gun Association and ZTC Charlton Heston's third cousin, was indignant over the Customs order.
NEWS
September 3, 2013
It's always refreshing to see a large public institution encourage employees to exercise a bit more common sense in the performance of their duties. That's why, in principle, we welcome the city school system's revised student code of conduct that gives administrators more discretion in deciding how to discipline students who bring toy guns, water pistols or other inappropriate items to school. Nevertheless, the lack of transparency in the way the recent changes were carried out was unfortunate.
TRAVEL
By Los Angeles Times | April 13, 2008
My sons, 11 and 13, and I will be traveling to visit friends in Europe this summer with boys the same ages. My sons are very excited and want to take some things to enjoy with their new friends. We were considering taking Nerf guns that shoot soft Nerf darts or a "gun" that shoots pingpong balls. Would we be able to pack these in our luggage? The Transportation Security Administration says yes. Nico Melendez, a spokesman for the TSA, said the toys "shouldn't be a problem." "Nerf guns aren't the problem," he added.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 5, 2002
Two men carrying toy guns robbed a branch of Allfirst Bank in Annapolis of an undetermined amount of cash yesterday morning, Annapolis police said. The men entered the bank in the 2000 block of Somerville Road about 10:20 a.m. and announced a robbery. An employee handed the men a bag of cash and the men fled - one on a bicycle and the other on foot - after leaving the toy guns on a counter, police said. A dye pack, which bank employees included with the cash, exploded shortly after the men left the building, according to police.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 28, 2003
Annapolis elected officials and residents debated last night whether the city should outlaw toy guns. The proposed ordinance would ban the sale and possession of toy guns that resemble actual firearms in the city. Anyone found with a realistic toy gun could be fined $1,000 and imprisoned for up to 90 days. "It's important to take these dangerous things away. Someone could really get hurt with one of these things," said Alderwoman Cynthia Abney Carter, a Democrat who represents the 6th Ward.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 28, 2003
Annapolis elected officials and residents debated last night whether the city should outlaw toy guns. The proposed ordinance would ban the sale and possession of toy guns that resemble actual firearms in the city. Anyone found with a realistic toy gun could be fined $1,000 and imprisoned for up to 90 days. "It's important to take these dangerous things away. Someone could really get hurt with one of these things," said Alderwoman Cynthia Abney Carter, a Democrat who represents the 6th Ward.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 23, 2003
The gold-colored gun looked real enough, but the would-be robber was almost unbelievable: He was 4 feet tall and 70 pounds. But employees of the Annapolis video store called 911, and the 8-year-old who brandished what turned out to be a toy gun -- while declaring he was going to "stand this place up" -- was charged in a juvenile citation with attempted armed robbery. Now, Annapolis Alderwoman Cynthia Carter, who arrived at the Hollywood Video store on Forest Drive just after the boy was handcuffed, said she wants all realistic-looking toy guns banned in the state capital.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2000
The Annapolis gun-buyback program is to expand its sweep this evening -- to children. In an event combined with anti-violence activities, youngsters have been invited to turn in their toy weaponry for cash, educational games, and books and clothing. "This isn't coming from any legislation," said Alderman Cynthia A. Carter, the Ward 6 Democrat who proposed the toy-gun buyback several weeks ago and said she has garnered community support. "This is just people who want to do something about guns and kids."
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
A Calvert County elementary school student was suspended last week for bringing a toy gun onto a school bus to show a friend, according to a lawyer representing his family. At a two-hour meeting Friday between officials, the boy, his parents and the attorney, the school system agreed to end the suspension early, and the student will be able to return to classes for the rest of the year. "You can tell by looking at him and listening to him that this kid doesn't have an ounce of malice in his heart," said Robin Ficker, the lawyer.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | January 12, 2012
The assault rifle looked real to the woman who it was pointed at. She quickly called police and they arrested a 23-year-old man and a teenager near Westminster High School in Carroll County, and charged them with assault and reckless endangerment. Maryland State Police said the "assault rifle" was actually an Airsoft gun "that closely resembled an assault rifle. " Toy guns are supposed to have orange tips so that police and other know they're not real, but police said this one had its tip painted black, "apparently to make it look more like a real firearm.
EXPLORE
January 11, 2012
Maryland State Police arrested a Sykesville man and a juvenile for pointing what they described as "a very realistic, but toy gun" at a motorist while driving on Route 97 in Westminster on Wednesday, Jan. 11. Shortly after 2 p.m., a driver contacted state police at the Westminster Barrack to report that she was behind an older model blue Buick on Route 97 near Westminster High School when a passenger in the vehicle rolled the window down, leaned...
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | July 13, 2011
Former Maryland women's basketball star Kristi Toliver made it on to "Pardon the Interruption" last week, but it wasn't for the kind of sharp shooting or the slick passing she showed while leading the Terps to the national title in 2006. It was for an elbow Toliver, now with theLos Angeles Sparks, delivered in a WNBA game. Last Tuesday, Toliver hit Mercury guard Ketia Swanier in the eye with her elbow, causing blood to squirt from Swanier’s eye. Swainer hasn’t played since the incident, which came in a Phoenix victory . Toliver was given a flagrant foul, but was not suspended.
TRAVEL
By Los Angeles Times | April 13, 2008
My sons, 11 and 13, and I will be traveling to visit friends in Europe this summer with boys the same ages. My sons are very excited and want to take some things to enjoy with their new friends. We were considering taking Nerf guns that shoot soft Nerf darts or a "gun" that shoots pingpong balls. Would we be able to pack these in our luggage? The Transportation Security Administration says yes. Nico Melendez, a spokesman for the TSA, said the toys "shouldn't be a problem." "Nerf guns aren't the problem," he added.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 4, 2004
MOON TOWNSHIP, Pa. -- Sunday mornings, there is God. Sunday afternoons, guns. After sitting in the pews of their Lutheran church, the Montest family will load up their white Chevy Suburban with guns, ammo and safety gear, and head out from their home in Whispering Woods, a Pittsburgh-area subdivision, to one of the two gun clubs they belong to. On a soggy-aired weekend in June, Margeaux Montest, just days out of sixth grade, loads her mother's Ruger...
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2003
The Annapolis city council agreed last night to postpone voting on a controversial ordinance that would have outlawed realistic-looking toy guns in the city. Alderwoman Cynthia A. Carter, sponsor of the ordinance, tabled it because she did not have sufficient support for passage. Carter, a Democrat who represents Ward 6, said she would continue to work on the bill and hoped to bring it to a vote soon. "If it's a toy, let it look like and appear to be a toy," she said. "It's simply out of sync with our reason to give children something that's dangerous."
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2003
The Annapolis city council agreed last night to postpone voting on a controversial ordinance that would have outlawed realistic-looking toy guns in the city. Alderwoman Cynthia A. Carter, sponsor of the ordinance, tabled it because she did not have sufficient support for passage. Carter, a Democrat who represents Ward 6, said she would continue to work on the bill and hoped to bring it to a vote soon. "If it's a toy, let it look like and appear to be a toy," she said. "It's simply out of sync with our reason to give children something that's dangerous."
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2003
The Annapolis city council is scheduled to decide tonight whether to ban the sale and possession of real-looking toy guns in the city. The proposed ordinance, introduced by Democratic Alderwoman Cynthia Abney Carter, would bar any toy "which substantially duplicates or can reasonably be perceived to be an actual firearm." Offenders could be fined up to $1,000 or jailed for up to 90 days. Carter, who represents Ward 6, said she planned to add an amendment to exclude toys that are transparent, brightly colored or otherwise don't resemble firearms.
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