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Toxic Waste

NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
Sixteen years after Congress declared war on toxic waste dumps, the federal government has managed to clean up less than a third of the nation's most badly contaminated real estate.In Maryland, where the first toxic-waste cleanup in the country took place under the federal Superfund program, the pace has been just as leaden. Hazardous chemicals have been removed or effectively contained at only four sites. Thirteen remain at a dozen military bases, abandoned factories and former landfills.
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NEWS
June 23, 1995
"Environmental racism" isn't a new expression. The Rev. Ben Chavis, former director of the NAACP, first used the term in 1982 to protest the location of a North Carolina toxic waste landfill. Since then numerous speakers have attempted to stoke the fires of activism by calling pollution in the inner cities the next civil rights issue.It's true that both industrialists and governments have typically put smoke-belching factories, air-polluting highways and waste-leaking landfills in communities where the people are least able to fight them.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | December 11, 1990
JACKSONVILLE, Ark. -- When the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency began its Superfund program on Dec. 11, 1980, amid a growing national fear of chemical hazards, it promised to protect public health and the environment from toxic waste.Now the $15.2 billion program is 10 years old, and it has completely cleaned up only 63 toxic sites. There are 1,187 more names on its "national priorities" list of cleanup sites, and final cost estimates range from $32 billion to $80 billion.Its critics say the Superfund program is bogged down in a bureaucratic swamp.
NEWS
May 9, 1994
What's in a name? Depends on what the name is. "Superfund site" is one such controversial appellation, supposedly designating toxic waste dumps for high-priority attention.That tag may apply to parts of the Army's Aberdeen Proving Ground, but it is not an accurate description of the entire 72,000-acre installation in Harford County where 5,500 people live and more than 15,000 soldiers and civilians work.The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, however, proposes to slap that derogatory label on all of APG, urged on by local environmental groups.
NEWS
By Dr. Donald L. Gill and Dr. Donald L. Gill,For the Howard County Sun | May 27, 1992
Drown, Farragut and Pendergrass. These names will become immortalized on the tomb of Howard County's waste disposal policy, which has now been cast in the ground under a small community in the heart of Howard County.These three alleged representatives of Howard County acted despicably. All they really do represent is the total lack of integrity that Howard County's government seems destined to perpetuate.These three County Council members voted to force through hastily worded legislation to allow a project to expand the Alpha Ridge Landfill at the very time this county needs to look for new alternatives for waste disposal.
NEWS
By New York Daily News | September 3, 1993
LANCASTER, Pa. -- For nearly 300 years the gentle, God-fearing Amish have worked this land, their backs turned on an outside world whose modern ways they do not want.Now a proposed toxic-waste dump in the heart of these bucolic farm fields has cast a long shadow over their historic presence, portending a spectacular collision of cultures that has some Amish contemplating the first mass exodus since their flight from Europe.State environmental officials have already approved the dump site, an old clay mine on a mountain at the headwaters of four watersheds serving soil-rich Lancaster County.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson | July 14, 1991
The first memory of poverty Richard Regan has from his childhood in Pembroke, N.C., is the "the dampness, coldness, unsightliness, offensiveness and embarrassment" of an outhouse."
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2001
A decision by European regulators yesterday to derail a merger between General Electric Co. and Honeywell International Inc. may revive a plan to build housing and offices on a toxic waste site in Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Honeywell, which owns the land, had agreed to explore a $300 million project proposed by local developers. The site near Caroline Street contains buried waste from a former AlliedSignal Corp. chromium ore plant. At 27 acres, it is the harbor front's largest undeveloped parcel.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | May 4, 1996
By now, it was supposed to be a park, a jewel of grass and trees for the East Baltimore neighborhood that straddles Highland Avenue south of Monument Street.But 16 years after the landfill at 3600 Monument St. stopped accepting trash, there is no playground, no benches or walkways. No park. Instead, dozens of rusted drums sit behind a locked gate -- the scene a testament, state and public works employees privately concede, to government inefficiency and neglect.Under the old landfill's grassy overgrowth are hundreds of containers of toxic waste secretly dumped among the regular bulk trash two decades ago. An aging system for pumping and treating the toxic materials is not being maintained properly, and tests of ground-water contamination show levels that exceed state and federal standards, according to internal Department of Public Works documents obtained by The Sun.As the landfill has fallen into disrepair, the surrounding )
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1996
Looking for ways to encourage growth in an industry that has been in the doldrums, Maryland's environmental businesses have formed an alliance.Business leaders say they hope the new group will give them a stronger voice in opposing or supporting legislation and will provide a network to encourage local companies to become business partners.With 678 environmental businesses in the state employing about 40,000 people, the business of cleaning up and preserving the environment is three times larger than the biotechnology industry and a little larger than telecommunications, according to state estimates.
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