Advertisement
HomeCollectionsToxic Chemicals
IN THE NEWS

Toxic Chemicals

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
The freight train that derailed Tuesday in Rosedale carried one chemical classified as hazardous by the U.S. Department of Transportation and another that also posed risks for firefighters and others at the scene even though not similarly classified. There might have been residues aboard of a third chemical that also is highly corrosive and hazardous. State health officials, however, said the incident represented only a low risk to the public. CSX spokesman Gary Sease said at least one of the dozen rail cars that appeared to be involved in the derailment contained sodium chlorate.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 13, 2013
It should come as no surprise to anyone that the churches are trying to avoid their civic duty to help clean up the toxic chemicals that wash off their property into the Chesapeake Bay ("Churches seek break on city stormwater fee," June 12). We have grown all too accustomed to the churches pontificating about the morals of others while their own moral compass is lacking. William Smith, Baltimore
Advertisement
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | September 25, 1993
Like beauty, "data integrity" lies in the eye of the beholder.The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has accused five Baltimore-area companies of providing faulty data about hazardous chemicals at their plants.Three of the companies say the accusations are unfair because the EPA's own recordkeeping is flawed.The dispute began last week when the EPA leveled charges about a lack of "data integrity," saying the five companies had not filed timely and accurate reports on the chemicals they use and release.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, Justin George and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
A freight train smacked into a truck carrying garbage and careened off the tracks in Rosedale Tuesday afternoon, triggering an explosion felt throughout the region and sending up a plume of black smoke visible for miles. Authorities identified the driver of the truck as John Alban Jr., a retired Baltimore County firefighter who owns a waste collection company near the scene of the crash. The Essex man was listed in serious condition at Maryland Shock Trauma Center Wednesday afternoon, a hospital spokeswoman said.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1995
A Chinese tug is standing by in Baltimore harbor to take the USS Coral Sea, a once-mighty aircraft carrier, to a shipbreaker's yard in India.The ship's exit, crowning the failure of a plan to dismantle the huge old warship in Baltimore, could come as early as next week.In its wake, the stripped and battered ship will leave behind a passel of lawsuits, a newfound respect for the difficulty in dealing with toxic chemicals on board old ships, and a determination by the Navy not to allow any more of its vessels to be sold overseas for scrap.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun Reporter | October 13, 2007
Environmental Protection Agency officials said yesterday they will crack down on the owner of a Brooklyn Park plant where 50,000 gallons of hazardous chemicals are stored, after acids and toxic chemicals were found leaking from their tanks into the ground. The action against Consolidated Pharmaceuticals Inc., expected as early as next week, comes on the heels of a $100,000 fine levied by the the state for multiple hazardous-waste violations and a letter Monday from Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold that said the site poses the risk of a "potentially catastrophic fire."
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | April 18, 1991
Maryland industries produce or use more than 100 pounds of toxic chemicals for every person in the state, two environmental groups said today in calling for new laws to reduce hazardous chemical usage in the workplace and in consumer products.The groups, Maryland Public Interest Research Group and the National Environmental Law Center, estimate that state industries make or use more than 495 million pounds of toxic chemicals a year, which is at least 15 times the amount state businesses report they release into the environment or dispose of as wastes.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2003
Toxic chemical releases increased slightly in Maryland from 2000 to 2001, largely because of increased demand for electricity from coal and oil-burning power generating plants in Anne Arundel County. That puts Maryland in contrast to the nation, where toxic chemical releases into the air, water and land declined by 15.5 percent during the same period, according to new data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The agency's Toxics Release Inventory also ranked Baltimore in the top 10 jurisdictions for releases of toxic chemicals from electric utility companies and petroleum storage facilities.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2000
Two Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. power plants in Anne Arundel County released 11.5 million pounds of toxic chemicals into the air in 1998, ranking them first in the state and 11th in the nation for toxins, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said yesterday. The EPA distributed its Toxics Release Inventory report for 1998, which monitors the volumes of 650 chemicals released into the environment by various industries in the U.S., including utilities. The Brandon Shores and Wagner Station plants released 16 of the 650 toxic chemicals.
NEWS
August 7, 1991
During its annual membership drive, representatives of the U.S. Public Interest Research group, the nation's largest environmental and consumer lobby, are focusing on two major pieces of federal environmental legislation that affect public health and environment: the Clean Water Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. According toPIR, U.S. companies use 350 billion pounds of toxic chemicals each year.These chemicals cause cancer, infertility and other diseases.Representatives of PIR will be seeking support by knocking on doors to collect signatures.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
The freight train that derailed Tuesday in Rosedale carried one chemical classified as hazardous by the U.S. Department of Transportation and another that also posed risks for firefighters and others at the scene even though not similarly classified. There might have been residues aboard of a third chemical that also is highly corrosive and hazardous. State health officials, however, said the incident represented only a low risk to the public. CSX spokesman Gary Sease said at least one of the dozen rail cars that appeared to be involved in the derailment contained sodium chlorate.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
In the 20 years she's lived on the outskirts of Salisbury, Arlene White said she'd never noticed anything unusual about her tap water. Now, though, White and dozens of neighbors are drinking bottled water and limiting their bathing after tests found unsafe levels of a toxic chemical in their household wells. A handful of residents, including Brian Bracken, have had large tanks hooked up to their homes, filled with treated water trucked in from nearby Fruitland. Local, state and federal officials are scrambling to provide safe, clean water to homes southeast of the Eastern Shore's largest city even as they acknowledge that they don't know the source or extent of the groundwater contamination.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2012
Decades after first discovering the problem, state officials have settled on a $27 million plan to keep a cancer-causing chemical in the ground at the Dundalk Marine Terminal from seeping into the Patapsco River and blowing into nearby residential areas. Under the plan, Honeywell International Inc. and the Maryland Port Administration jointly pledged to re-line leaky storm drains beneath the state-owned shipping facility, which have run yellow at times with chromium-tainted water. They also vowed to see that pavement covering the contaminated soil remains intact so it can't become airborne.
NEWS
June 7, 2012
Having spent my career working to address the burden of disease in disadvantaged communities in central Maryland, I appreciated Del. Jim Hubbard and Hannah Pingree's op-ed ("Hold chemical companies to account," June 4). Maryland needs to be doing more to protect our most vulnerable citizens - the young, the old, those with fewer financial or educational resources - from toxic chemicals. I've just read Rachel Carson's "Silent Spring," written in 1962, which makes it clear how long Americans have been exposed to dangerous pesticides and other chemicals.
NEWS
By James Hubbard and Hannah Pingree | June 4, 2012
Last month, we read a powerful story about just how far one industry would go to protect its bottom line. In a four-part exposé in the Chicago Tribune titled "Playing with Fire," we learned how big chemical companies - on a mission to sell more toxic chemicals - covered up the health impacts of their products, exaggerated their effectiveness, and went to extremes to scare legislators like us, poised to regulate these chemicals. The Tribune series detailed how the industry set up sham "citizen groups" to promote its agenda in the media, lied to low-income communities to garner community leaders' support, and even teamed up with Big Tobacco.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
An independent panel of scientists says two government-issued studies can't show if people were harmed by toxic pollution from Fort Detrick contaminating the ground water, but further studies are unlikely to answer lingering questions about the health impacts of the cancer-causing chemicals buried decades ago at the Frederick military base. In a review sponsored by the Army, a committee of environmental and health experts with the National Research Council took issue with a study by the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, which concluded that tainted ground water seeping out from Detrick's Area B was "unlikely to have produced any harmful health effects, including cancer.
NEWS
June 13, 2013
It should come as no surprise to anyone that the churches are trying to avoid their civic duty to help clean up the toxic chemicals that wash off their property into the Chesapeake Bay ("Churches seek break on city stormwater fee," June 12). We have grown all too accustomed to the churches pontificating about the morals of others while their own moral compass is lacking. William Smith, Baltimore
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1996
Maryland's largest environmental group called yesterday for a 50 percent reduction in the use of toxic chemicals in the Chesapeake Bay region over the next decade and got an immediate pledge of cooperation from the Glendening administration.William C. Baker, president of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, said at an Annapolis news conference that the bay and portions of its tributaries are still "seriously impaired" by toxic pollution, despite an extensive cleanup effort that has focused on nutrients from sewage and farm runoff.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | January 23, 2012
Children's health advocates are calling on state legislatures to ban flame retardants in baby's products after testing found the toxic chemicals in 85 percent of items it tested. The toxic retardants were found in nursing pillows, car seats and other popular baby products, according to a report released Monday by Maryland PIRG and Washington Toxics Coalition and Safer States . The groups said the flame retardants are linked to cancer, hormone disruption and other health problems.   Children and families are exposed to the compounds, called Tris chemicals, when they escape from household items and contaminate house dust and indoor air, the groups said.
NEWS
January 3, 2012
Whether casting a line in a Maryland stream or a lake in the most remote reaches of this country, a fisherman would be hard-pressed to catch a fish that does not contain mercury. Indeed, most recent studies suggest that it might be impossible. Is this a new development? Not really. It's been true for years, and states post warnings - most often directed at children and pregnant or nursing women - to limit their intake of fish for this very reason. A lot of saltwater fish (particularly those that prey on other fish, like shark and swordfish)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.