Advertisement
HomeCollectionsToxic
IN THE NEWS

Toxic

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Paul Krugman | August 29, 2003
LAST WEEK a quietly scathing report by the inspector general of the Environmental Protection Agency confirmed what some have long suspected: In the aftermath of the World Trade Center's collapse, the agency systematically misled New Yorkers about the risks the resulting air pollution posed to their health. And it did so under pressure from the White House. The Bush administration has misled the public on many issues, from the budget outlook to the Iraqi threat. But this particular deception seems, at first sight, not just callous but gratuitous.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
The decades-long decline in lead-poisoned children in Maryland has essentially stalled, but state officials said Thursday they are taking steps in the coming months to address gaps in the marathon effort to eliminate the environmental health threat. Statewide, 2,622 youngsters up to age 6 were found to have harmful levels of lead in their blood last year, according to an annual report just released by the Maryland Department of the Environment. That's down 4 percent from 2012, though the number of children with seriously elevated lead levels grew slightly, from 364 to 371. Exposure to even minute amounts of lead can harm still-developing brains and nervous systems of young children, leading to learning and behavioral problems.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Heather Dewar and Sun Staff | September 27, 2000
Fourth of five articles ANZHEN, China -- Nitrogen fertilizer has lifted the yoke off Hua Xijin's shoulders. Before the "green revolution" came to China, it took roughly 6 tons of river mud to fertilize a rice paddy small enough to fit in the corner of a football field. Hua carried the mud on his back, 130 pounds at a time, in bamboo baskets lashed to a wooden pole. Now 58-year-old Hua spends about a week each planting season sprinkling his field with hundreds of pounds of chemical fertilizer, leaving plenty of time for playing mah-jong or fishing in a nearby river.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
A Baltimore jury has awarded nearly $2.1 million to a 17-year-old city youth who was allegedly poisoned by lead paint in the 1990s when he was a toddler in an East Baltimore rental home. The judgment against Elliot Dackman and the estates of Sandra and Bernard Dackman came Friday in Baltimore Circuit Court, at the end of the weeklong trial of a lawsuit brought on behalf of Daquantay Robinson by his mother, Tiesha Robinson. The jury verdict shows the long-running tide of litigation over the widespread use of lead-based paint in Baltimore's older rental housing has yet to ebb, according to Bruce Powell, the Robinsons' lawyer.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Staff Writer | July 12, 1995
The thief who swiped a semitrailer in eastern Baltimore County may have gotten more than expected -- 9,600 pounds of toxic material.County police are looking for the 53-foot-long trailer, which was headed for a Georgia warehouse when it was stolen July 5. Its cargo included 96 steel drums of chromium trioxide, an orange, flaky, toxic material used in car manufacturing."
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | July 30, 2009
Ventilation systems are being installed by the state in three homes in Baltimore's Westport neighborhood, according to state officials, after tests found toxic vapors seeping into the dwellings from long-abandoned industrial sites nearby that had been the focus of an emergency hazardous-waste cleanup decades ago. In addition, said James Carroll of the Maryland Department of the Environment, efforts are under way to treat potentially cancer-causing solvents...
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1998
Johns Hopkins Hospital's medical practices may be cutting edge, but its methods of handling garbage and toxic wastes put it near the back of the pack in efforts to prevent pollution, according to a Washington environmental research group.In a survey of 50 of the nation's top hospitals, the nonprofit Environmental Working Group found that some are trying to cut their share of air pollutants by burning less waste, while reducing the amount of harmful chemicals, like mercury, that they use.Medical waste incinerators are ranked by the Environmental Protection Agency as one of the nation's top sources of toxic air pollution.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | June 27, 1991
County utilities workers yesterday sealed off a wastewater line froma Brooklyn Park pharmaceutical company to prevent another chemical spill into the public sewer system.Sewer service to Kanasco Ltd. was cut off at noon after company officials failed to respond to a 24-hour notice asking them to explain the leak of a powerful industrial solvent Sunday night, the latest of seven spills at the plant.Traces of methylene chloride, the same toxic solvent spilled by Kanasco in 1988, were found in a milky liquid flowing from a pipe intothe sewer system, said Jody Vollmar, spokeswoman for the Department of Utilities.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2000
The blue-green algae that bloomed in tidal rivers throughout the upper Chesapeake Bay last month was toxic, an independent laboratory has confirmed, but so far has not harmed wildlife or caused human health problems, state officials said yesterday. Some strains of the algae, identified as Microcystis aeruginosa, can cause skin problems and flu-like symptoms in humans and can sicken or kill livestock or pets that drink it. Tests performed at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio, confirmed the presence of the algae's toxin, said Rob Magnien, director of tidewater ecosystems assessments for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | November 15, 2007
The Sanctuary, a retired World War II-era vessel languishing in Baltimore waters for years, contains high levels of toxic polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, according to a report obtained yesterday by The Sun. The survey, performed in July by a company that once considered buying the former Navy hospital ship, confirms the suspicions of environmentalists. It contradicts assertions by the new owner, Potomac Navigation Inc., that the vessel contains few PCBs. The Delaware-registered company plans to take the vessel to Greece in the next few weeks, but concerns raised by a Seattle environmental group, the Basel Action Network, could delay the process.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Leon Furman, former director of sales for a machinery company and a World War II veteran, died May 3 of heart failure at University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 95. The son of Stephen Furman, founder and president of Pederewski Building & Loan, and Maryanna Furman, owner of Lauren's Grocery Store in Walbrook, Leon Furman was born and raised on Haubert Street in Locust Point. After graduating from Southern High School, he attended the Johns Hopkins University.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
Nothing will grow in one area of my lawn. I've tried shrubs and perennials multiple times and watered when needed, but they still die. How do I test for a toxin in the soil? When testing for a plant toxin, you must specify which one. That's impossible in cases like this. In any case, such tests are expensive. However, you can do a simple home test by planting annual ryegrass seed in two containers, one filled with suspect soil and the other with healthy soil. Observe for a week after germination.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 30, 2014
Environmentalists are slamming a new draft Chesapeake Bay restoration agreement for failing to address toxic pollution or even mention climate change as a complicating factor in the three-decade effort to revive the ailing estuary. The Chesapeake Bay Program , a "partnership" of the Environmental Protection Agency and the six states that drain into the bay - including Maryland - released Wednesday a draft agreement "to guide the next chapter of restoration across the watershed.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 14, 2013
A public meeting tonight (Thursday) will give city residents a chance to ask questions about environmental safeguards for developing Harbor Point, a former factory site in Fells Point where toxic chromium remains entombed underground. The meeting , arranged by Councilman James B. Kraft, is to be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the Morgan Stanley building at 1300 Thames St. The session, postponed from last month because of the federal government shutdown, will cover plans by Beatty Development Group to build a 22-story tower on the site of the former Allied chromium processing plant.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
When Jim Wilson retired from the federal government four years ago, he and his wife moved to Kent Island, where they initially enjoyed watching ospreys fishing in Northwest Creek from their waterfront home. But now, Wilson and most others living around the creek stay out of the murky water, which has turned yellow-green the past two summers. Even the ospreys steer clear of it, he said. Fish kills and stubborn "blooms" of blue-green algae, which at times form a floating scum, plague Northwest Creek.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
I've learned that nandina berries kill cedar waxwings. I love birds! Should everyone cut down their nandina bushes? Those reported waxwing deaths occurred in the southern United States, where cedar waxwings overwinter. This exquisite bird happens to be a notorious glutton. It gorges itself on berries or fruit, even to the point of intoxication on overripe berries. Their first choice of diet would be native plants, but when faced with little plant diversity, those reported waxwings filled up on toxic nandina berries, which contain cyanide.
NEWS
October 28, 1992
Hazardous material control teams from the Maryland Department of the Environment continued their search yesterday for the source of toxic benzene fumes discovered leaking into the basement of a house in the 3400 block of View Ridge Circle on Monday.High levels of the dangerous fumes were found coming from a crack between the foundation and the floor of the home of Charles J. Ehrenfeld Jr.He and his wife were evacuated from the house overnight by county health officials.Mr. Ehrenfeld and his wife told fire department officials they had smelled a gasoline-like odor in the house for several weeks and the smell had been getting worse until it became overpowering Monday, said Lineboro Fire Chief John L. Krebs.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2002
A long-simmering scientific controversy over Pfiesteria piscicida, the microscopic cell suspected of killing fish and making people sick, reached the boiling point yesterday when five North Carolina scientists challenged the work of the nation's main Pfiesteria expert. The scientists, led by biologist Wayne Litaker of the University of North Carolina, published the results of their research, saying they believe Pfiesteria is not the complicated creature described by JoAnn Burkholder of North Carolina State University, the organism's co-discoverer.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 12, 2013
As a reminder of just how persistent some toxic chemicals can be, a Johns Hopkins-led research team reports finding traces of long-banned DDT and PCBs along with other contaminants in the blood of 50 pregnant women checked from Baltimore and its suburbs.  In a study posted online by the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology , the scientists say they detected more frequent and vigorous fetal movements in the wombs of...
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 3, 2013
Despite a foul-smelling algae bloom and fish kill this time last year, Baltimore's ailing harbor actually earned a C-minus grade overall for water quality in 2012, according to the latest ecological report card issued by the Healthy Harbor campaign. But even that mediocre rating, to be issued Monday at an Inner Harbor press conference, comes with a big asterisk, as the report card's compilers note that rainfall last year was far below normal, reducing the amount of pollution washed off city and suburban streets, parking lots and yards.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.