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Towson University

SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
After the pain of Towson cutting its men's soccer program in March 2013 had subsided, Kay Banjo was faced with a life-changing decision: He could go pro and try out for Major League Soccer or finish his undergraduate degree and then use his final year of eligibility elsewhere. It was a no-brainer. "My dad has always been big on education, and I know I'm not going to play soccer my whole life, and I need to have something to fall back on," Banjo said. "I had one more semester to graduate.
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NEWS
By Kym Byrnes and For The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
A sea of blue - the color designated to promote prostate cancer awareness - bobbed up and down around the Towson University campus Sunday morning as more than 2,000 people participated in the eighth-annual ZERO Prostate Cancer Run/Walk. One in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and more than 33,000 men will die this year of the disease, according to Patricia Schnably, event organizer and vice president of marketing and communications at Chesapeake Urology. "Like a lot of cancers, if you don't catch it early, it spreads through the body and eventually will kill you," Schnably said.
NEWS
Carrie Wells and Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
One Towson University student drank so much alcohol he was unable to speak and threw up "without a pause" before passing out outside a nearby apartment complex, according to an anguished email his mother sent to university officials. Another student attempted to drink a bottle of Southern Comfort and ended up in the hospital with a blood alcohol content of 0.34 percent, a level that's life-threatening. In 2012, a rugby club member was so intoxicated he told a dormitory resident assistant that the year was 1993.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
She is the girl from a rundown neighborhood who became class president at a posh prep school. A quiet and driven Towson University student. An adoring mother. One of the unofficial leaders of the sisterhood of wives and girlfriends of Ravens teammates. Janay Ashley Rice is also a woman America has seen knocked unconscious by the man she loves. The grainy clip of her now-husband, former Ravens running back Ray Rice, punching her in an elevator has been played repeatedly on national media in the past week.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Police and the state medical examiner have determined that a Towson University student who died over the weekend fell into a glass door and suffered head and neck injuries that killed her. Julia Margaret Ratnaraj, 18, of Sewell, N.J., had been drinking before the incident, people who were with her at the time told police. Her death was an accident, police said Thursday. Shortly before midnight Saturday, police responded to a call for an overdose at an apartment in the 300 block of E. Joppa Road.
NEWS
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun and By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
At the Towson University football team's home opener late last month, the loudest cheers arguably came for the smallest athlete on the field. With the current Towson gymnastics team by her side, 24-year-old alumna Kacy Catanzaro stood in the endzone and waved to the roughly 8,000 fans in attendance. "Let's go, Kacy! Let's go, Kacy!" the student section began to chant as Catanzaro — dressed in a black top, denim shorts and boots pulled up to her knees — flashed her megawatt smile.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
The Towson University student who died over the weekend after being found unresponsive at an off-campus apartment was a talented artist who made a difficult decision to attend a different college than her twin sister, according to her high school counselor. Baltimore County police said Monday they were investigating the circumstances that led to the death of 18-year-old Julia Margaret Ratnaraj, a freshman from Sewell, N.J., outside Philadelphia. Emergency responders were called to an apartment on the 300 block of E. Joppa Road about 11:30 p.m. Saturday for a report of an overdose, according to a police report.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
A female student at Towson University died Saturday night at an off-campus residence, a university spokeswoman said. The university did not immediately identify the student or the circumstances of her death. University spokeswoman Gay Pinder said the cause of death was not violence, but she declined to elaborate. Towson officials have been in touch with the family, who live out-of-state, Pinder said. She did not say where the student was from. Baltimore County Police and Fire departments said they had not fielded any calls related to the incident and were not handling the investigation.
NEWS
Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
University System of Maryland schools have had mixed success in improving the graduation rates of minority and low-income students, according to an annual progress report released this week. Some colleges, including the University of Maryland, College Park and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, have been able to boost minority and low-income achievement. But at other schools, the gaps between those students and middle-class whites have increased in recent years. "I was shocked to see the numbers," said Frank M. Reid III, a university system regent and pastor of Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
The University System of Maryland could expand its tuition remission program for the dependent children and spouses of employees. Under the current program, spouses and dependent children can attend the employee's college without paying any tuition. The spouse or dependent child can also get a 50 percent discount on college tuition at another college in the state system if the student is in an academic program not offered at the employee's institution. The proposed revision to the policy would eliminate the unique academic program requirement and allow the student to get 50 percent tuition remission at any university system college where they have been accepted.
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