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By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | December 4, 1990
THOKOZA, South Africa -- Tensions between rival black groups erupted in a new round of fighting in this battle-weary township yesterday, resulting in at least 52 deaths during a 24-hour period.Thousands of Thokoza residents fled their homes in a grim replay of scenes from August and September, when more than 800 people died in township clashes in the region around Johannesburg.Police imposed a nighttime curfew on Thokoza and three other townships where violence had flared. They said 71 people were killed in the four townships between Sunday and yesterday afternoon.
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NEWS
By Justin George and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
An off-duty Baltimore police officer was charged Tuesday in Pennsylvania with attempted homicide after police there said he shot a man multiple times outside the officer's home. John E. Torres, 33, is accused of shooting a 34-year-old Baltimore man several times in the upper torso and arm after a confrontation outside of Torres' apartment complex around midday. York Area Regional Police Sgt. Jeffry Dunbar said Torres, who was in his police uniform at the time but off-duty, turned himself in at the scene.
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NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | June 16, 1992
SOWETO, South Africa -- It's Sunday in Soweto and time for another funeral, an almost daily event in the black township these days.This time the deceased is the son of a friend, Time magazine photographer Peter Magubane, who grew up in Soweto and covered violence for 40 years before it knocked at his own door.Charles Magubane had been missing for three weeks before his father found his body, hacked and shot, in a Soweto morgue. No one knows exactly how or why he died, which is often the story when violence strikes here.
NEWS
November 10, 2004
Gibson Kente, 72, a South African playwright lauded for fighting the stigma of AIDS by publicly announcing he was HIV-positive, died Sunday at his home in Soweto, relatives said. Mr. Kente was among the first to write about the township realities of crime, hooliganism, alcoholism, love and politics. His plays included Manana, The Jazz Prophet, How Long and Sikhalo. Called a "living treasure" by the National Arts Council, Mr. Kente produced nearly two dozen plays and three television dramas between 1963 and 1992.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | November 23, 1990
KHAYELITSHA, South Africa -- Mike Mapongwana sits in the front room of his spare little house talking about the night a group of men bombed the house and killed his wife.The ceiling is new, the walls have been whitewashed, glossy linoleum squares cover three-quarters of the concrete floor, and glass panes have been replaced in two windows that face each other across the room.The assailants opened fire from outside both windows as Mr. Mapongwana and his family lay asleep Oct. 17.His wife, Nomsa, was hit as she leaped from bed, but Mr. Mapongwana grabbed the children, ages 7 and 3, and shoved them under a table in the kitchen, where they waited for the barrage to end. A homemade bomb came hurtling through one of the broken windows, and the ceiling went up in flames.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | October 29, 1990
WESSELTON, South Africa -- A stream of water washes across the narrow tar road that leads into this black township from the adjacent white town of Ermelo, where wide palm trees with pineapple-shaped trunks line neatly kept streets. A water main has burst or some township residents have ripped open a pipe, causing the little flood across the sun-baked road.Silas Nkonyane, a leader of the local civic association, pronounces the scene a "waste of good water," a commodity that Wesselton residents can't afford to treat casually these days.
NEWS
By Kathy Boccella and Kathy Boccella,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 8, 1992
BENSALEM, Pa. -- With 57,000 residents, several major highways, two shopping malls and, some say, gobs of historical significance, you'd think Bensalem would be on the map.Think again.According to state cartographers, Bensalem, which lies north of Philadelphia, doesn't exist.Now, thanks to a country-and-western show, Bensalem will finallyget its due when Pennsylvania updates its official transportation map in April 1993.After 300 years, some people feel it's about time."We're bigger than a lot of cities that are on the map," said Councilwoman Barbara Barnes.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 1, 1996
SADSBURY TOWNSHIP, Pa. - For three centuries, little Sadsbury Township in western Chester County near Philadelphia has never been far from its past.Its eight square miles are a quilt of forest and farmland, some of it held by the same families since the early 1700s. Log homes, built when Sadsburyville was an overnight stop for Conestoga wagons trundling to Philadelphia, still stand along the old Lancaster Turnpike. There is only one traffic light, shared with a neighboring township, and not so much as a whiff of fast food.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 11, 2001
ALEXANDRA TOWNSHIP, South Africa - The children on Seventh Avenue stop playing and look up, as surprised as if they just saw a meteor drop out of the sky. Could this be right? A van of white tourists is on a Sunday afternoon drive through their black township. This is, after all, Alexandra, a no-go area known for carjackings, killings and cholera. A place so feared by Johannesburg residents that many blacks don't dare to visit and whites won't drive within a mile of its border. But the van stops, and a tour guide steps out along with eight men and women with cameras slung from their shoulders and explains this is the street where Nelson Mandela once lived.
NEWS
By ARTICLE BY JOHN MURPHY and ARTICLE BY JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 6, 2002
SOWETO, South Africa - It's morning in Soweto. Minibus taxis rattle along the streets, jarring residents awake with their blaring horns. Smoke rises from the coal fires burning in the overcrowded shacks of squatter camps. Children in matching uniforms plod to school across the dusty township under the first rays of a brilliant sun. At 3259 Khoali St., Thabo Molefe wakes up in the chilly hallway of his family's home. Nine people live in the brick two-bedroom house. Molefe's 88-year-old grandmother, a frail woman who spends most of the day in bed, has one of the bedrooms.
NEWS
By Hugo Kugiya and Hugo Kugiya,NEWSDAY | June 19, 2004
EAGLESWOOD TOWNSHIP, N.J. - Through the days of rising dread and until the moment the death of Paul M. Johnson Jr. was all but certain, the sign outside Captain's Carpet and Vinyl read simply, "Paul Johnson," so that those who passed would think of him. Minutes after hearing of Johnson's death at the hands of kidnappers who claim membership to al-Qaida, Captain's co-owner Paul Josephsen set about to change the message. "I haven't found the right words yet," Josephsen said, wearing an expression of suppressed and simmering rage.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson, Dan Fesperman and Scott Calvert and Lynn Anderson, Dan Fesperman and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2003
BRECKNOCK TOWNSHIP, Pa. - The unsolved mystery of yesterday afternoon involved nothing more sinister than a mangled mailbox, and it didn't take long for local authorities to finger the chief suspect: a county snowplow. That's the kind of trouble people are used to in this farming community in Lancaster County, a region famous for its Amish people and covered bridges. Worse crime is not unheard of here, or in the county, but the township's last murder came in a domestic dispute some 60 years ago, the county historian says.
NEWS
By David N. Dunkle and David N. Dunkle,THE PUBLIC OPINION | October 17, 2002
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Joe Rinehart takes his horseshoes seriously, although he looks very relaxed as he prepares to throw at one of nine new horseshoe pits in Norlo Park. His left leg steps forward and his right arm rises high in the air as the shoe arcs from his fingers and spins toward a metal stake 30 feet away. Chlunk! When the 80-year-old Guilford Township resident tosses a shoe - about 2 pounds, 8 ounces of inch-thick cast iron - it rotates three-quarters of a turn on its journey.
NEWS
By ARTICLE BY JOHN MURPHY and ARTICLE BY JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 6, 2002
SOWETO, South Africa - It's morning in Soweto. Minibus taxis rattle along the streets, jarring residents awake with their blaring horns. Smoke rises from the coal fires burning in the overcrowded shacks of squatter camps. Children in matching uniforms plod to school across the dusty township under the first rays of a brilliant sun. At 3259 Khoali St., Thabo Molefe wakes up in the chilly hallway of his family's home. Nine people live in the brick two-bedroom house. Molefe's 88-year-old grandmother, a frail woman who spends most of the day in bed, has one of the bedrooms.
NEWS
By Maria Newman and Maria Newman,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 4, 2002
PRINCETON, N.J. -- A New Jersey township's plan to reduce its deer population by capturing them in nets and firing a bolt into their skulls has provoked an outcry from animal rights advocates and some of the community's well-known artists and thinkers. The township, Princeton, has hired a private firm to kill the deer using the method, which opponents call cruel and inhumane. The opponents sponsored a rally at Palmer Square in Princeton featuring the singer Patti Smith and speakers such as the author Joyce Carol Oates and the ethicist Peter Singer.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2001
MANOR TOWNSHIP, Pa. - A powerful Pennsylvania legislator and his family stand to gain nearly $20 million in a controversial deal for a landfill that could threaten the Susquehanna River, which supplies more fresh water to the Chesapeake Bay than all its other tributaries combined and is a back-up source of drinking water for Baltimore. The legislator, state Rep. John Barley, chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, is selling 300 acres for a landfill expansion that would lie within 100 feet of the river.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 23, 1992
Whoever murdered Xhosa people in Boipatong township is in effective charge of South African negotiations.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2001
MANOR TOWNSHIP, Pa. - A powerful Pennsylvania legislator and his family stand to gain nearly $20 million in a controversial deal for a landfill that could threaten the Susquehanna River, which supplies more fresh water to the Chesapeake Bay than all its other tributaries combined and is a back-up source of drinking water for Baltimore. The legislator, state Rep. John Barley, chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, is selling 300 acres for a landfill expansion that would lie within 100 feet of the river.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 11, 2001
ALEXANDRA TOWNSHIP, South Africa - The children on Seventh Avenue stop playing and look up, as surprised as if they just saw a meteor drop out of the sky. Could this be right? A van of white tourists is on a Sunday afternoon drive through their black township. This is, after all, Alexandra, a no-go area known for carjackings, killings and cholera. A place so feared by Johannesburg residents that many blacks don't dare to visit and whites won't drive within a mile of its border. But the van stops, and a tour guide steps out along with eight men and women with cameras slung from their shoulders and explains this is the street where Nelson Mandela once lived.
NEWS
By Maria Newman and Maria Newman,New York Times News Service | April 30, 2000
In the first study in the country on the incidence of autism among young children, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have confirmed that there was a striking number of autism cases in Brick Township, N.J., but found no link between the disorder and environmental factors in the town. Agency officials, who traveled to Brick recently to report the findings of their yearlong investigation, also said that, while there were no other studies in the United States with which to compare their results, the overall prevalence of autism in the country might be higher than previously believed.
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