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NEWS
September 19, 1990
Dr. Wilfred H. Townshend Jr., 74, who practiced internal medicine in Baltimore for 45 years, died Saturday at his home in Brooklandville.A memorial service was held yesterday at St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church, St. Paul and 20th streets.Besides maintaining his own practice, Dr. Townshend served as director of the Student Health Office on the Baltimore campus of the University of Maryland for many years before retiring from that post in 1971.Also, he had been a consultant at the Springfield State Hospital and was the physician on call for several hotels in the 1950s and 1960s.
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FEATURES
February 27, 2007
"I have never amassed money. I live well and so do all my dependents and a number of lovable freeloaders." Musician Pete Townshend, explaining that money is a factor in his decision to tour with the Who again.
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FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | January 17, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Pete Townshend is working with the La Jolla Playhouse on a stage adaptation of the Who's legendary 1969 album "Tommy."Mr. Townshend and Des McAnuff, the La Jolla artistic director, have been working on it for several months. Mr. McAnuff will direct the piece during its July 12 to Aug. 16 run." 'Tommy' is like an icon -- almost a symbol of pop culture," Mr. McAnuff said.For years, the story came alive only in people's minds as they listened to the album or the Who in concert.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 15, 2003
LONDON - The list includes police officers and dentists, judges and politicians, lawyers, teachers and social workers, and, as of Monday, the guitarist Pete Townshend of The Who. In all, more than 1,300 people have been arrested in Britain in the past 10 months as part of Operation Ore, a nationwide hunt for users of child Internet pornography. Townshend was taken into custody on Monday, questioned and then released without being charged. Police in London seized computers and other material from his house and said they planned to interview him again.
NEWS
September 18, 1990
A memorial service for Dr. Wilfred H. Townshend Jr., who practiced internal medicine in Baltimore for 45 years, will be held at 2 p.m. today at St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church, St. Paul and 20th streets.Dr. Townshend, who was 74, died Saturday at his home in Brooklandville.In addition to maintaining his own practice, he served as director of the Student Health Office on the Baltimore campus of the University of Maryland for many years before retiring from that post in 1971.He was a member of the staffs of Maryland General Hospital, St. Joseph Hospital and University Hospital, where he had served as an intern and resident.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gary Graff and Gary Graff,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | August 12, 1994
The Rolling Stones are out there. So are Pink Floyd and the Eagles.But where's the Who?In its 30th anniversary year, the group -- part of a legendary British rock troika with the Beatles and Stones -- is not entirely quiet. There's a new boxed set in stores, "The Who: Thirty Years of Maximum R&B." Singer Roger Daltrey also has released "Daltrey Sings Townshend," a tribute to Who guitarist and chief composer Pete Townshend that was recorded with an orchestra and guests -- including Mr. Townshend -- during a pair of February concerts in New York.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 29, 1999
It's deja vu all over again at Corridor Transportation Corp.Ray Ambrose, transit administrator for 10 years until he left in May to work for Yellow Transportation, will be back at his old job starting Nov. 15, said Walter Townshend, president and chief executive officer of the Baltimore-Washington Chamber of Commerce, who has been filling in.The chamber oversees the corporation, a private nonprofit operation that provides bus services in portions of Howard,...
FEATURES
February 27, 2007
"I have never amassed money. I live well and so do all my dependents and a number of lovable freeloaders." Musician Pete Townshend, explaining that money is a factor in his decision to tour with the Who again.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 22, 1993
New York -- From those first thunderous chords, the Who' "Tommy" has an exhilarating familiarity. Guitars, bass, drums, keyboards, signature French horn: "You know you're in 'Tommy'-land," says Joseph Church, music director of the rock opera that opens on Broadway tonight."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen and By Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff | June 30, 2002
I'm not the quiet one, everyone else is too loud," bassist John Entwistle sang on the Who's otherwise forgettable Face Dances album in 1981. Still, John Entwistle -- who died of a heart attack Thursday in Las Vegas -- is remembered as the quiet one of the Who, which joined with the Beatles and Rolling Stones to form the great triumvirate of British rock bands. Entwistle, 57, was found dead in his hotel room on the eve of the Who's American tour, which was set to begin Friday in Las Vegas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen and By Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff | June 30, 2002
I'm not the quiet one, everyone else is too loud," bassist John Entwistle sang on the Who's otherwise forgettable Face Dances album in 1981. Still, John Entwistle -- who died of a heart attack Thursday in Las Vegas -- is remembered as the quiet one of the Who, which joined with the Beatles and Rolling Stones to form the great triumvirate of British rock bands. Entwistle, 57, was found dead in his hotel room on the eve of the Who's American tour, which was set to begin Friday in Las Vegas.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 29, 1999
It's deja vu all over again at Corridor Transportation Corp.Ray Ambrose, transit administrator for 10 years until he left in May to work for Yellow Transportation, will be back at his old job starting Nov. 15, said Walter Townshend, president and chief executive officer of the Baltimore-Washington Chamber of Commerce, who has been filling in.The chamber oversees the corporation, a private nonprofit operation that provides bus services in portions of Howard,...
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 10, 1999
For Rolph Townshend of Annapolis, the final day of the GMC Yukon/Sailing World NOOD Regatta was a workout he will remember, winning one race and placing third in another to win the venerable Alberg 30 Class."
NEWS
March 4, 1999
Frances C. Ripley Martin, 88, steeplechase riderFrances Caroline Ripley Martin, a former steeplechase rider and fox hunter, died Feb. 25 of cancer at Anne Arundel Medical Center. She was 88.The former Frances Caroline Townshend was born at Four Winds Farm in Davidsonville and lived most of her life on the 155-acre working farm that has been in her family since 1890. She graduated from Annapolis High School in 1932.As a young woman, she was a noted equestrian, competing in the show ring and the steeplechase.
NEWS
By J. D. Considine BTC and J. D. Considine BTC,sun staff | November 24, 1996
"Behind Blue Eyes: The Life of Pete Townshend," by Geoffrey Giuliano. Dutton. 352 pages. $24.95. One thing people love about celebrity journalism is the chance to hear an artist "speak" through interviews that stress long, unedited quotes. Unlike conventional profiles, where the writer acts as a sort of filter between the subject and the reader, these quote-driven pieces simply take down what the star has to say and offer it up without comment.That may make for magazine copy, but it's hell on biographies.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 28, 1995
When the Who's "Live at Leeds" was first released, some 25 years ago, it was greeted with equal measures of enthusiasm and disappointment. Although both fans and critics were eager to hail it as one of the greatest live rock performances on record, most added that, good as it was, listening to the album wasn't quite the same as being there.Why not? For one thing, the original album was a mere 45 minutes long, whereas the actual concert clocked in at two hours and 15 minutes. For another, though the actual show included a complete performance of "Tommy," the album touched on the rock opera only once, when "My Generation" detoured into some random quotes from the work.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 15, 2003
LONDON - The list includes police officers and dentists, judges and politicians, lawyers, teachers and social workers, and, as of Monday, the guitarist Pete Townshend of The Who. In all, more than 1,300 people have been arrested in Britain in the past 10 months as part of Operation Ore, a nationwide hunt for users of child Internet pornography. Townshend was taken into custody on Monday, questioned and then released without being charged. Police in London seized computers and other material from his house and said they planned to interview him again.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 28, 1995
When the Who's "Live at Leeds" was first released, some 25 years ago, it was greeted with equal measures of enthusiasm and disappointment. Although both fans and critics were eager to hail it as one of the greatest live rock performances on record, most added that, good as it was, listening to the album wasn't quite the same as being there.Why not? For one thing, the original album was a mere 45 minutes long, whereas the actual concert clocked in at two hours and 15 minutes. For another, though the actual show included a complete performance of "Tommy," the album touched on the rock opera only once, when "My Generation" detoured into some random quotes from the work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | December 23, 1994
It makes perfect sense that a former MTV veejay is starring in "The Who's Tommy", which opened at Kennedy Center last night. Completely aside from Steve Isaacs' fine performance, his casting is appropriate because this stage version of the 1969 British rock-opera recording is theatrical MTV.Besides the usual credits for direction (Des McAnuff), choreography (Wayne Cilento), scenery (John Arnone), etc., the program lists credits for projections, video, special effects and technical supervision, among others.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | December 18, 1994
Ruth Channing's engravings on viewRuth Channing creates works on an unusually large scale for an engraver -- 18-by-20-inches. These aren't deadly serious works; they possess a kind of whimsical humor both in terms of their imagery and in terms of Channing's freely drawn line.Channing's works are on view at Halcyon Gallery, along with a group of paintings by Richard Sobel, whose pictures of cities and towns have both psychological and surrealist overtones, recalling the work of Giorgio de Chirico.
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