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NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | March 22, 1992
Annapolis officials ended a monthlong controversy over managing the city's off-street parking by awarding the contract Friday to Towne Park Ltd., a local valet parking company that submitted the lowest bid.Towne Park will take over managing the city's parking lots, the Noah Hillman Garage and the Gotts Court Garage, a multilevel parking structure under construction off Calvert Street.In announcing the contract, Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins noted it would save city taxpayers nearly $80,00 a year.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
Annapolis Mayor Josh Cohen said Wednesday that in an effort to ease parking woes in the city's downtown area, the company that operates city garages will launch free weekend valet parking at the Hillman Garage. Annapolis city officials said the valet parking can add 50 to 60 spaces at the garage by using driving lanes and maximizing the use of parking spaces. The Hillman Garage, nestled between Main Street and Duke of Gloucester Street, has 451 spaces. Visitors who want to use the valet service should enter the garage from Gorman Street, on the Main Street side of the garage.
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BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | August 10, 2008
Melia Wilkinson wasn't worried when she handed over the keys to her 2005 Toyota Sienna to the valet at the Sheraton City Center in downtown Baltimore last May. All she was thinking about was making it to a work luncheon on time. "I was running a little late, and every garage was full," said Wilkinson, 41, a marketing director and Baldwin resident. "The valet service was $20 or $30, a little expensive, but it was a hot, hot day. So I pulled in there. When I left the luncheon, I was pulled aside and told that there had been an accident, and there was some damage to the car."
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | August 10, 2008
Melia Wilkinson wasn't worried when she handed over the keys to her 2005 Toyota Sienna to the valet at the Sheraton City Center in downtown Baltimore last May. All she was thinking about was making it to a work luncheon on time. "I was running a little late, and every garage was full," said Wilkinson, 41, a marketing director and Baldwin resident. "The valet service was $20 or $30, a little expensive, but it was a hot, hot day. So I pulled in there. When I left the luncheon, I was pulled aside and told that there had been an accident, and there was some damage to the car."
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | February 28, 1992
Union leaders representing 25 parking garage workers in Annapolis pleaded again with Annapolis officials yesterday to delay hiring a new company to manage the city's off-street parking.Calling the city's request for bids "just ludicrous" because it failed to guarantee wages and benefits, representatives for Park America employees asked the City Council's Finance Committee to take a closer look at a contract about to be awarded to a rival.Park America Inc. ran the city's parking lots and garages for more than a decade, continuing 2 1/2 years after its last contract expired.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | March 11, 1992
They clustered on opposite sides of the room -- union workers sporting hand-lettered "Re-bid" stickers standing behind young non-union men in bright red uniform jackets.The focal points of a month-long debate, the 40 workers for two parking management companies in Annapolis packed City Hall to fight for their jobs. But by the end of Monday night, there were still no clear winners.After two hours of wrangling over the ethics of saving money at the expense of employee health benefits, the City Council took no action on a bid controversy over managing Annapolis' off-street parking.
NEWS
By Staff report | March 9, 1992
Annapolis' parking garage workers plan to pack City Hall for a showdown on their jobs tonight.The City Council is scheduled to vote on a contract that would transfer management of Annapolis' off-street parking to a new company.Employees for Park America Inc., the Philadelphia-based company that has run the city's lots and garages for more than a decade, fear they will be fired or forced to take a significant pay cut. They alsohave expressed concern that they will lose medical benefits.In agesture toward the employees, the council turned over the contract to its Finance Committee for a closer review.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
Annapolis Mayor Josh Cohen said Wednesday that in an effort to ease parking woes in the city's downtown area, the company that operates city garages will launch free weekend valet parking at the Hillman Garage. Annapolis city officials said the valet parking can add 50 to 60 spaces at the garage by using driving lanes and maximizing the use of parking spaces. The Hillman Garage, nestled between Main Street and Duke of Gloucester Street, has 451 spaces. Visitors who want to use the valet service should enter the garage from Gorman Street, on the Main Street side of the garage.
NEWS
January 22, 1996
New Windsor soon might have a town park at Routes 31 and 75.The town recently signed a deal with the state for the 1/2 -acre parcel. The state Board of Public Works, which must approve the transfer, probably will review the proposal at its meeting later this month.The town must pay the $800 transfer cost and agree to maintain the property, keep it in public use and erect no permanent structures."We will be able to have a gazebo or fountain on the site, however," said Mayor Jack A. Gullo Jr.The town hopes to place a century-old public fountain in the park.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | February 3, 1993
Suburban sprawl has swallowed just about all the open space left in booming Bel Air.Now, the largest undeveloped tract within the town limits -- 47 acres of forest, wetlands and sloping open land along Churchville Road -- is on its way to becoming the town's largest public recreation area.Bel Air's town commissioners unanimously approved Monday a final amendment to an agreement with Harford County that would transfer the land to the town of Bel Air, essentially clearing the way for the park plans to go forward.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2003
A team of urban designers unveiled a plan yesterday for a town center in Randallstown that they say would integrate the community's strong residential neighborhoods, natural features and history while mitigating the heavy traffic, commercial development and lack of identity that have afflicted the area for years. The product of work by the second Urban Design Assistance Team to visit Baltimore County in two years, the plan calls for the gradual transformation of aging shopping centers and apartment complexes around the intersection of Liberty and Old Court roads into an area combining high-density residential property, new commercial development, offices and a number of civic spaces, such as a community college branch, a YMCA and a theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 23, 2003
HERSHEY, Pa. - For a blissful autumn jaunt less than two hours from Baltimore, take a leisurely drive north where the foliage is in full blush, and the scent of chocolate tinges the air. If you last visited Hershey as a child or have yet to experience the pleasures of Chocolate Town U.S.A., now is the perfect time of year. Days are gloriously crisp, summer crowds have thinned, and Halloween festivities are in full swing. At the end of October, Hershey and its famous park turn "spook-tacular," with an array of entertainment, fall food, kids activities, themed rides and more.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2003
For 10 years it has been just another vacant city lot. But in a few years, nearly 10 acres at Scott and McHenry streets in Washington Village/Pigtown is to become a bustling residential community with 150 town homes and a park. Yesterday, Mayor Martin O'Malley, other elected officials and city leaders attended a groundbreaking ceremony at the site, one of many such ceremonies for the mayor this week as he continues his re-election campaign. O'Malley is expected at a groundbreaking ceremony today for Frankford Estates in Northeast Baltimore, which will consist of 67 single-family homes, 54 duplexes and 49 town homes.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2001
The small brick plaza and rectangle of grass wedged in front of the Locust Lane shopping area on Main Street in downtown Westminster have been largely the same for 20 years. The area has a couple of concrete planters, and a few benches and trees. Last year, an artist painted a mural of the town's streets on one of the brick walls facing the park. The park, though nice, is hardly inspiring. Westminster officials want to improve the pocket park and increase public use. They also want to tie the park into the area in front of the Westminster library branch across the street.
TRAVEL
By Reed Hellman and Reed Hellman,SPECIAL OF THE SUN | May 2, 1999
Standing on Route 1 near Rehoboth, Del., witnessing an ocean of people surge over acres of tax-free outlet stores, you'd never guess that the locals call this place "Slower, Lower Delaware."Sometimes, even a well-mannered beach resort like Rehoboth can seem too hectic. Traveling a slower road through the rest of Delaware's Sussex County can fill more than one weekend with adventure. "Inland Sussex County is the Delaware you never knew," says Millsboro shop owner Pete Marconi. Eight years ago, Marconi's signature T-shirts first publicized the county's calmer approach to life.
NEWS
January 22, 1996
New Windsor soon might have a town park at Routes 31 and 75.The town recently signed a deal with the state for the 1/2 -acre parcel. The state Board of Public Works, which must approve the transfer, probably will review the proposal at its meeting later this month.The town must pay the $800 transfer cost and agree to maintain the property, keep it in public use and erect no permanent structures."We will be able to have a gazebo or fountain on the site, however," said Mayor Jack A. Gullo Jr.The town hopes to place a century-old public fountain in the park.
TRAVEL
By Reed Hellman and Reed Hellman,SPECIAL OF THE SUN | May 2, 1999
Standing on Route 1 near Rehoboth, Del., witnessing an ocean of people surge over acres of tax-free outlet stores, you'd never guess that the locals call this place "Slower, Lower Delaware."Sometimes, even a well-mannered beach resort like Rehoboth can seem too hectic. Traveling a slower road through the rest of Delaware's Sussex County can fill more than one weekend with adventure. "Inland Sussex County is the Delaware you never knew," says Millsboro shop owner Pete Marconi. Eight years ago, Marconi's signature T-shirts first publicized the county's calmer approach to life.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2003
For 10 years it has been just another vacant city lot. But in a few years, nearly 10 acres at Scott and McHenry streets in Washington Village/Pigtown is to become a bustling residential community with 150 town homes and a park. Yesterday, Mayor Martin O'Malley, other elected officials and city leaders attended a groundbreaking ceremony at the site, one of many such ceremonies for the mayor this week as he continues his re-election campaign. O'Malley is expected at a groundbreaking ceremony today for Frankford Estates in Northeast Baltimore, which will consist of 67 single-family homes, 54 duplexes and 49 town homes.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | November 12, 1993
HAYMARKET, Va. -- The economic slump in this tiny town hard by Bull Run Mountain began with an invasion of Union soldiers, who burned it to the ground on Nov. 4, 1862. Once a thriving commercial center, Haymarket never regained its prewar prominence.This week brought another army -- the media hordes who descended on Haymarket after news leaked out the Walt Disney Co. was planning to build a $1 billion American history theme park on a 2,000-acre tract just outside this town of some 472 souls.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | February 3, 1993
Suburban sprawl has swallowed just about all the open space left in booming Bel Air.Now, the largest undeveloped tract within the town limits -- 47 acres of forest, wetlands and sloping open land along Churchville Road -- is on its way to becoming the town's largest public recreation area.Bel Air's town commissioners unanimously approved Monday a final amendment to an agreement with Harford County that would transfer the land to the town of Bel Air, essentially clearing the way for the park plans to go forward.
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