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By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | November 13, 2009
A long-awaited renovation of Baltimore's historic Town Theatre will finally move to the construction stage if a local theater company can raise the last $3.5 million it needs to pay for construction. Everyman Theatre, which operates out of leased space on Charles Street, has reached 80 percent of its goal of $17.75 million to renovate the 99-year-old building on Baltimore's West Side, and aims to begin construction in the spring of 2010. The Town Theatre renovation is one of more than a dozen cultural and recreational projects in Baltimore that are moving ahead this fall with the help of loans approved by city voters last year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
When Vincent Lancisi was 6 years old, his father sat the boy on his lap for a serious conversation. "Don't ever go into the music business, Vinny," Ben Lancisi told his youngest son. "You'll never make any money in the entertainment industry. And it's terrible for family life. " The boy loved and admired his father and was determined to follow his advice. So, though he showed talent at the piano and had a pleasing tenor, he didn't pursue a musical career when he grew up. He started his own theater company instead.
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NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun theater critic | November 15, 2006
The Town Theatre, the former west-side vaudeville house that will be Everyman Theatre's new home, closed in 1990 - coincidentally, the year Everyman was founded. But the Town had a long, colorful history before that. Originally called the Empire, the theater was designed by Otto Simonson of Baltimore and W.H. McElfatrick of New York. It opened on Christmas Day in 1911, with seating for more than 2,200 on several levels, as well as pool parlors, a soda fountain and a rathskeller, as Robert Kirk Headley Jr. recounted in his 1974 book, Exit: A History of Movies in Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
Early in the renovations at the former Town Theatre movie house on West Fayette Street, a member of the architectural firm was hoisted on a cherry picker and spotted something beneath the grime up at the top of the facade of the century-old building. It was a single capital letter: "E. " "Everybody got such a kick out of that," said architect Diane Cho of Cho Benn Holback + Associates. "It was very kismet. " That "E," left over from the first commercial establishment on that spot in 1911, a vaudeville house called the Empire Theatre, would fit just fine for the new owner - Everyman Theatre . This week, about 18 months after work on the $18 million renovation project started, Everyman, a 22-year-old professional Equity company with an admired corps of resident actors and designers, opens its new home to the public.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | April 4, 2009
Everyman Theatre signed a new three-year lease Friday at its current location at 1727 N. Charles St. But a theater spokesman said the company still plans to move into its new home in Town Theatre in the fall of 2011. "The move isn't being delayed," Managing Director Ian Tresselt says. "We're still very much on track." In November 2006, Everyman announced that it would move into the renovated vaudeville house at 315 W. Fayette St., doubling the current number of seats to about 300. Initially, that move was projected to occur in the fall of 2009.
NEWS
December 24, 2012
In a holiday season that celebrates giving, Maryland's nonprofit arts organizations have been playing their part. Not only do they inspire and enrich our lives in innumerable ways large and small, they're also an important source of economic vitality and innovation for the communities they serve. Earlier this month the Maryland State Arts Council, which tracks revenue and attendance figures at the state's 244 arts groups and programs, reported that in 2011 arts organizations generated a total of $518 million in direct spending by presenters and audiences and created more than 11,000 jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
Three men in a home for aging veterans yearn for a taste of life beyond the institution's grounds. They want to soar right out of there, like the geese in a V-formation they can see overhead. Those World War I veterans are the sole characters in "Heroes," the Tom Stoppard-translated comedy by Gerald Sibleyras that opens Friday at Everyman Theatre . The production can't help but take on extra significance. It's the company's last scheduled staging at the Charles Street location where Everyman has been based since 1994.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and Jamie Smith Hopkins and J. Wynn Rousuck and Jamie Smith Hopkins,sun reporters | November 15, 2006
In a development that could further the transformation of downtown Baltimore's west side from a neglected shopping district into a vibrant arts center, Everyman Theatre, a thriving regional troupe, will move into a vacant vaudeville house across from the restored Hippodrome. Civic leaders say the shift into the Town Theatre - to be announced today - will build on the Hippodrome's momentum, reviving a once-grand theater district. The development comes in the midst of improvements to the west side, which has added restaurants and more than 750 apartments in the past two years, a turnaround after the shopping district's long slide.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2010
The air inside the Town Theatre is so dank, musty and throat-irritating that 30 potential donors who took a tour of the facility last weeks were provided face masks. Yellow caution tape spills out everywhere. Chunks of concrete have fallen onto the seats, and the former stage curtain, now faded to a dull tan, is ripped and torn. At the moment, the atmosphere inside the 1911 structure is so oppressive it drives visitors outside and onto the street. But that's all about to change. Construction is expected to begin this summer or in early fall on a $17.7 million project to transform the historic former vaudeville house into Everyman Theatre 's new home.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2012
Vincent Lancisi stands in a pile of rubble sweating under his hard hat, while all around him — board by board, pipe by pipe and hammer blow by hammer blow — a theater is taking shape. It's still nearly eight months until the opening of Everyman Theatre 's new home in the old Town Theatre, the former vaudeville palace downtown that is undergoing a $17.7 million transformation, and it's starting to look like a performing space. Last week, the stage went in, and Lancisi, the troupe's artistic director, can barely contain his excitement.
NEWS
December 24, 2012
In a holiday season that celebrates giving, Maryland's nonprofit arts organizations have been playing their part. Not only do they inspire and enrich our lives in innumerable ways large and small, they're also an important source of economic vitality and innovation for the communities they serve. Earlier this month the Maryland State Arts Council, which tracks revenue and attendance figures at the state's 244 arts groups and programs, reported that in 2011 arts organizations generated a total of $518 million in direct spending by presenters and audiences and created more than 11,000 jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
Three men in a home for aging veterans yearn for a taste of life beyond the institution's grounds. They want to soar right out of there, like the geese in a V-formation they can see overhead. Those World War I veterans are the sole characters in "Heroes," the Tom Stoppard-translated comedy by Gerald Sibleyras that opens Friday at Everyman Theatre . The production can't help but take on extra significance. It's the company's last scheduled staging at the Charles Street location where Everyman has been based since 1994.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2012
Vincent Lancisi stands in a pile of rubble sweating under his hard hat, while all around him — board by board, pipe by pipe and hammer blow by hammer blow — a theater is taking shape. It's still nearly eight months until the opening of Everyman Theatre 's new home in the old Town Theatre, the former vaudeville palace downtown that is undergoing a $17.7 million transformation, and it's starting to look like a performing space. Last week, the stage went in, and Lancisi, the troupe's artistic director, can barely contain his excitement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2010
The air inside the Town Theatre is so dank, musty and throat-irritating that 30 potential donors who took a tour of the facility last weeks were provided face masks. Yellow caution tape spills out everywhere. Chunks of concrete have fallen onto the seats, and the former stage curtain, now faded to a dull tan, is ripped and torn. At the moment, the atmosphere inside the 1911 structure is so oppressive it drives visitors outside and onto the street. But that's all about to change. Construction is expected to begin this summer or in early fall on a $17.7 million project to transform the historic former vaudeville house into Everyman Theatre 's new home.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2009
The directors of Everyman Theatre came $500,000 closer to their goal of creating a home inside Baltimore's Town Theatre, after Mayor Sheila Dixon announced Monday that the city is allocating money to help the project. The state money is to revitalize West Baltimore, and the city chose to help renovate the Town Theatre, 315 W. Fayette St. Everyman members said they have raised $15.1 million of their $17.75 million goal. - Edward Gunts
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | November 13, 2009
A long-awaited renovation of Baltimore's historic Town Theatre will finally move to the construction stage if a local theater company can raise the last $3.5 million it needs to pay for construction. Everyman Theatre, which operates out of leased space on Charles Street, has reached 80 percent of its goal of $17.75 million to renovate the 99-year-old building on Baltimore's West Side, and aims to begin construction in the spring of 2010. The Town Theatre renovation is one of more than a dozen cultural and recreational projects in Baltimore that are moving ahead this fall with the help of loans approved by city voters last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
When Vincent Lancisi was 6 years old, his father sat the boy on his lap for a serious conversation. "Don't ever go into the music business, Vinny," Ben Lancisi told his youngest son. "You'll never make any money in the entertainment industry. And it's terrible for family life. " The boy loved and admired his father and was determined to follow his advice. So, though he showed talent at the piano and had a pleasing tenor, he didn't pursue a musical career when he grew up. He started his own theater company instead.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | April 4, 2009
Everyman Theatre signed a new three-year lease Friday at its current location at 1727 N. Charles St. But a theater spokesman said the company still plans to move into its new home in Town Theatre in the fall of 2011. "The move isn't being delayed," Managing Director Ian Tresselt says. "We're still very much on track." In November 2006, Everyman announced that it would move into the renovated vaudeville house at 315 W. Fayette St., doubling the current number of seats to about 300. Initially, that move was projected to occur in the fall of 2009.
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