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NEWS
September 12, 1990
UNION BRIDGE - The Maryland Department of the Environment will allow the town more time to find about $60,000 in additional money needed before 25 homeowners can hook into the town's water and sewer systems.Mayor Edward L. Williar said the state made available a $70,000 grant last month for the project, which would assist the residents whose water supply comes from Bowman Springs. The owner of the springs has given the residents until the end of 1991 to find an alternate water source.Town officials met with the commissioners Thursday to see how the county can help.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | June 7, 2007
Grappling with an ever-tightening water supply, the growing town of Mount Airy has given up on tapping nearby rivers in favor of a renewed search for wells that can produce enough water so that homes already approved there can be built. This week, the Town Council approved a new agreement with the Maryland Department of the Environment limiting development until additional sources of water can be found to supplement the 10 wells now supplying the community of nearly 8,500 residents on the border of Carroll and Frederick counties.
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NEWS
September 26, 1990
UNION BRIDGE - The county is willing to provide Union Bridge with a $31,000 interest-free loan to help pay for new sewer and water hookups, K. Marlene Conaway, assistant director of planning, told the Town Council Monday.The money would be added to a $70,000 state grant to offset costs of adding about 29 homes to the town's water and sewer systems.The homes currently receive water from a private system on the Bowman Springs farm. Dennis Bowman said he wants to discontinue the service by the end of 1991.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | February 4, 2007
Mount Airy's water commission is pushing for an ordinance that would shut down development in the water-deficient town that straddles the border of Carroll and Frederick counties. Councilman John Woodhull and members of the town's water commission have called for a growth moratorium until a new water source is secured to ward off an impending deficit. Woodhull is drafting an ordinance that could be adopted as soon as March, if it is approved by the Town Council. The 8,500-resident town consumes 715,000 gallons of water per day, less than 10,000 gallons from the maximum amount its wells can safely yield, Woodhull said.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | April 9, 1993
The town of Manchester needs to make sure it has an adequate water supply and enough water storage capacity, said Theresa Wellman, a community assistance administrator with the state Department of Housing and Community Development."
NEWS
September 28, 1993
Manchester seeks engineering studyThe Manchester town council has asked the Maryland Center for Environmental Training at Charles County Community College for help in writing a request for bids for an engineering study of the town's water system.Jake Bair, the training center's director, said the study is expected to cost $20,000 to $30,000.Workers at the center will develop a computer model of the Manchester water system that the town can use to make decisions about such issues as extending water lines, adding water tanks, adding pumping stations or eliminating the use of springs.
NEWS
November 6, 1996
Union Bridge Town Council is considering increasing its water connection charge and sewer benefit assessments, one-time charges paid by new customers.The impact of the proposed increases would fall on the Phillips property, 120 acres scheduled for development as a residential subdivision by owner G. Jackson Phillips Jr. and developer Martin K. P. Hill. The planned 265 single-family houses and 52 townhouses will double the town's population of 930.James Schumacher, a consultant and part-time town manager, recommended increasing the 2-year-old fees to help cover improvements to the town's water and sewer systems.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | September 22, 1993
Manchester residents are still waiting to hear how much they will pay for water and sewer service in fiscal 1994, while town officials disagree about how much money must be raised for the town's water and sewer funds.Mayor Earl A. J. "Tim" Warehime Jr. and Town Manager Terry L. Short have said that unless water rates go up, the town will not collect enough money to cover this year's budget.Councilman John A. Riley says some increase may be necessary, but he feels uncomfortable setting new water and sewer rates until he knows how much money is left in the water and sewer funds from last year.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1997
It took a decade, but Union Bridge finally persuaded the state to help fix a deteriorating water system.A $300,000 grant from the state Board of Public Works will allow the town to drill a new well and repair the old one that has served the town's nearly 1,000 residents for almost a century.Union Bridge has tried repeatedly to secure state aid for the antiquated, one-well system. The well has never failed but several tests have shown the casings are deteriorating. As the town grows, officials are increasingly uneasy about dependence on a single source of water.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | April 15, 1994
Like sponges too drenched to absorb anymore, the overflowing Mississippi River and other tributaries around central and southern Illinois sent thousands of residents back to sandbagging yesterday with visions of last year's flood.Along the Mississippi from St. Louis to Illinois' southern tip, volunteers worked to bolster levees that were facing their first test since being rebuilt temporarily after the Flood of 1993. The ground is still so soggy from last year's floodwaters that new rainwater is simply running off.In central Illinois, towns unaffected last year battled some of the worst flooding in memory.
NEWS
July 11, 2006
While the Ehrlich administration thinks about drafting a policy for selling fresh water on or under publicly owned lands, the Department of Natural Resources says it wants to consider all options in order to "avoid a problem down the road." That's easy enough. Don't sell the water. The state already allows some buildings in Carroll County and a Western Maryland ski resort to tap into nearby public water supplies, but the current issue is not about them or how they are able to use the resource despite the lack of a formal procedure within the DNR. The matter is bubbling up now because of growth and the pressure of growth around small towns - mostly in the rolling Piedmont countryside - and outside state parks.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2004
A moratorium on building permits remains in place in a Frederick County town despite a meeting yesterday between local officials and the state Department of the Environment to discuss the water supply. Richard J. McIntire, spokesman for the department, said state officials agreed to evaluate three wells that Middletown officials believe could meet the town's water needs. He said Environment Secretary Kendl P. Philbrick agreed to meet again with town officials in 30 days. Philbrick banned the issuance of new building permits in Middletown last month, saying the town had disregarded two years of warnings that it was growing too fast for its water supply.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2003
Sometimes, it came out of the faucet with a greenish tint. Other times, it flowed too weakly to fill a fire hose. Often, in the summer, there just wasn't enough of it. Then, Larry Hentz came along. Now, clear, fresh-tasting tap water rushes through Hampstead's pipes as surely as morning traffic clogs the town streets. And Hentz? He is, as far as the Maryland Rural Water Association is concerned, the state's "water decision maker of the year." An engineer who makes $170 an hour advising other governments on their water systems, Hentz ran successfully for the Hampstead council in 1995 after hearing a revered figure in his field question why the experts never seemed to make the policy decisions in the towns where they slept.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2002
Union Bridge has a new mayor for the first time in 12 years. The Town Council selected one of its members, Bret D. Grossnickle, to fill the post vacated by Perry L. Jones Jr. Jones, who was elected to the board of Carroll County commissioners on Nov. 5, stepped down as mayor last week. Grossnickle, who has been on the Town Council for 15 years, will serve out a term that ends in May. He said he will probably seek election then. Grossnickle, 44, said the town government's priorities won't change much under his watch.
NEWS
By Lesa Jansen and Lesa Jansen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 31, 2001
With improvements to Mount Airy's water distribution system expected to be completed next month, town officials will consider easing water-use restrictions that have been in place since spring. The town is spending $325,000 to expand and improve the water distribution system, making it more even throughout town. The north water tower is more heavily used because of greater development on the town's north side. Mayor Gerald Johnson said a study addressing the town's water needs identified the distribution system as a key element.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2000
The chairman of the Carroll homebuilders association said the industry won't be inconvenienced while Mount Airy puts new development proposals on hold for a few months to study the town's water supply. Richard L. Hull, who works in Mount Airy as owner of Carroll Land Services Inc. and serves as chairman of the county chapter of the Homebuilders Association of Maryland, said he has had no complaints. "The plans that have been previously submitted in the concept phase or beyond they're allowing to move forward," he said.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,Sun Staff Writer | July 13, 1994
The Manchester Town Council will consider an ordinance late this month to put a moratorium on building permits until the end of the town's current water shortage.At a council meeting last night, Mayor Earl A. J. Warehime Jr. ordered Town Manager Terry L. Short, attorney Charles Fisher Jr. and council member Chris D'Amario to draft an ordinance for consideration and a possible vote July 27.Mr. Warehime also told Mr. Short not to grant any building permits during the next two weeks while the ordinance is being written.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1995
Manchester officials are scrambling to find a way to pay for new wells before a state-imposed February deadline to stop tapping springs that have supplied the town's drinking water for years.Since 1933, more than 50 percent of the town's water has been supplied by three springs that federal and state environmental officials now say are too near the surface and must be replaced with wells or a filtration system.Mayor Elmer C. Lippy said this week that the town is negotiating with the state for grant money that could pay for finding water, purchasing the land and drilling the wells.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | November 24, 1999
Negotiations with the Cordish Co. have led to an agreement in which the Baltimore-based developer of North Carroll Shopping Center will donate land for a new water tower if Hampstead allows the center to use the town's water supply.The deal was not written and ready for approval by the Hampstead Town Council on Monday night because of a death in the family of a Cordish negotiator. The council postponed action on the agreement until next month.The Town Council had been expected to approve the deal Monday, but would have had to pass an ordinance allowing the town to sell its water to businesses not in its corporate limits.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1999
Raw sewage that leaked from an underground pipe severed in a construction accident June 18 has seeped through layers of limestone and reached the water supply of Walkersville.Officials in the town five miles northeast of Frederick are trucking in fresh water and advising residents to boil tap water for one to three minutes before using it. They are also installing an additional filter system at their water-treatment plant, said Elizabeth Pasierb, Walkersville's planning and zoning administrator.
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