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By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | April 12, 1993
Juvenile vandalism is becoming more of a problem in New Windsor, but residents disagree about who's causing the trouble.The Town Council, a resident trooper and some of the more vocal residents blame children who live in apartments owned by John Connell Sr., a local businessman who has about 60 units in town.Mr. Connell has heard the allegations against his renters. He says he doesn't think the children involved live in his apartments.But even if they do, Mr. Connell said, it is not his concern.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
"Gone, but not forgotten" is the nostalgic slogan adopted by organizers of Discover Daniels Day, a one-time event Saturday that will mark 40 years since the last remnants of the town of Daniels were demolished by Tropical Storm Agnes. Haven't heard of Daniels? You're not alone. The picturesque and bustling mill town, with manufacturing roots dating to the early 19th century, was located four miles north of Ellicott City at a bend in the Patapsco River and straddled the northeastern Howard County border into Baltimore County.
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NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2003
Former Taneytown Mayor W. Robert Flickinger decisively recaptured the city's top job from incumbent Henry C. Heine yesterday in an election that also saw two incumbents retain their seats on the City Council. Flickinger defeated Heine 288 votes to 105 votes, said city clerk Linda Hess. In the council race, incumbents Darryl G. Hale and James A. Wieprecht outpolled challenger Richard L. Hess Jr. Flickinger, 70, served as mayor for 18 months in the 1970s and between 1995 and 1999. He did not seek re-election four years ago, but supporters launched a write-in campaign on his behalf and Heine, the only declared candidate that year, defeated him by only 22 votes.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
The narrow footbridge that crosses U.S. 29 in Columbia opened three decades ago with the promise of connecting the town's commercial center with the residential communities to the east. Today, the underused structure is unlit, encircled in chain-link fence and often covered in graffiti - uninviting to residents looking for a convenient way to cross the five-lane expressway that divides a town planned by renowned developer James W. Rouse, who sought to emphasize connections between its communities.
NEWS
July 31, 1994
The following editorial appeared in another edition of The Sun last week:Carroll County* Residents of crime-plagued neighborhoods around the Baltimore metropolitan region would welcome the "crime wave" that some New Windsor residents believe has swept over this Carroll town.Teen-agers riding bikes on sidewalks, using disrespectful language and hanging around may be annoying to some of the older town residents, but their activities are not criminal. Forming a town police force, as a minority of residents advocate, will not do anything to improve youthful behavior.
NEWS
July 26, 1994
Residents of crime-plagued neighborhoods around the Baltimore metropolitan region would welcome the "crime wave" that some New Windsor residents believe has swept over this Carroll town.Teen-agers riding bikes on sidewalks, using disrespectful language and hanging around may be annoying to some of the older town residents, but their activities are not criminal. Forming a town police force, as a minority of residents advocate, will not do anything to improve youthful behavior. A policeman cannot arrest a teen-ager for talking back to adults, for standing on a street corner or riding a bike on the wrong side of the street.
NEWS
November 14, 1990
SYKESVILLE - Town residents would able to erect satellite dishes in their yards if an amendment introduced by the Town Council on Monday becomes law.The measure would amend an ordinance that bars such devices on residences inside the town limits.The council scheduled a Dec. 10 hearing to take public comment on the proposed amendment.As written, the measure would restrict satellite dishes to side yards or back yards; require the devices be set back 10 feet from property lines; and require that they be visibly blocked from view from public rights of way.The council debated the third provision, indicating it may be too harsh and may be removed in the final version.
NEWS
April 4, 1995
Municipal governments are supposed to epitomize the best in American democracy. Small towns are closer to the people, non-bureaucratic, responsive.Yet Carroll's municipalities are having trouble getting town residents to vote or run for office. With elections in Sykesville, Hampstead, New Windsor, Union Bridge, Westminster, Manchester and Taneytown beginning a month from now, residents have the opportunity -- should they choose -- to reinvigorate the county's municipal governments.Voter turnout for town elections of late has been abysmal.
NEWS
By Ana Arana and Ana Arana,Special to The Sun | May 17, 1991
SEGOVIA, Colombia -- Green mountains surround this gold-mining town where folks don't venture out of their homes at night. The night belongs to gun-slinging members of paramilitary groups, guerrillas and plain common criminals who are responsible for five to six killings a day.This is the town Colombian journalists Julio Daniel Chaparro and Jorge Enrique Torres Navas, a reporter and photographer for the daily El Espectador, visited April 24 to get an...
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | March 1, 1995
New Windsor Mayor Jack A. Gullo Jr. showed the Carroll County Commissioners around town yesterday. The tour was both convivial and purposeful."Instead of talking, the town is small enough to go out and see," Mr. Gullo said. "This is our opportunity to show the commissioners what we need and let them see where the county can assist us the most."Mr. Gullo said he hoped the commissioners would see that the town needs a community center, better and bigger space for its Fire Department, an accessible Town Hall with offices, a place for seniors to meet and youth to play.
NEWS
By Doug Smith and Doug Smith,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 14, 2007
BAGHDAD -- U.S. and Iraqi army units supported a citizen policing group in a daylong battle that repelled an al-Qaida in Iraq assault on a town south of the capital, the U.S. military said yesterday. Between 30 and 45 attackers on foot and in vehicles mounted with machine guns stormed two checkpoints manned by a citizens' group that had recently formed to protect Adwaniya, about 12 miles south of Baghdad. The untested residents, fighting with their personal weapons and minimal combat gear, held their positions until help arrived first from the Iraqi army and then U.S. ground and aerial forces.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun reporter | November 4, 2007
CHESTERTOWN --The Eastern Shore Land Conservancy, which has helped preserve 40,000 acres of the region's farmland and forests since its founding in 1990, is asking for ideas about developing parts of a 500-acre tract on the doorstep of this Colonial-era waterfront village. Organizers say a new land-use planning project could become a model for Chestertown and other small towns facing increasing pressure to annex adjacent parcels and accommodate large-scale development. Starting tomorrow, the town of 4,800 residents is due for what organizers describe as a weeklong "charrette."
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun reporter | September 24, 2007
PRESTON --Twenty years ago, when Mimi and Bill Willis were still considered newcomers in this Eastern Shore village, they whiled away late-summer evenings on the front porch - chatting, rocking, listening to warm-weather sounds and counting the reasons they'd left the congestion of suburban Washington. ... Not anymore. Like their neighbors who live along Main Street, they have long since retreated indoors to block out the din of cars and trucks rumbling through - 11,149 vehicles a day, by the State Highway Administration's count.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2005
RISING SUN - For decades, little changed in this Cecil County town of 2,000, a one-stoplight settlement off U.S. 1 so small that residents can't walk the streets without running into someone they know. One of the familiar faces was police Chief George Walker, who often knew the people he arrested - including his cousin, whom he once locked up on a charge of writing a bad check. But in a sign of how much things are changing around here, the town abruptly forced Walker to resign this fall after 21 years with the police force.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2004
PORT DEPOSIT - As construction workers begin shoring up a big section of the century-old retaining wall that has threatened to fall since February, there is concern among residents and officials in this Susquehanna River town that another section of the wall might also be in danger of tumbling. "It's scary," said Lisa Von Brauen, who lives on Main Street, about a block from Town Hall and near High Street - where tons of the granite wall were removed in May to prevent it from falling on homes below.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2004
Faced with state cuts and rising costs for electricity, fuel and health insurance, Sykesville has proposed its first property tax increase in more than a decade. On Monday, the Town Council proposed a 4-cent increase, which would push the rate to 34 cents per $100 of assessed value. The council scheduled a public hearing on the 2004-2005 budget for May 24. "We have been frugal in how we have invested and spent town money," said Mayor Jonathan Herman. "This is an adjustment because of the times.
NEWS
March 22, 2001
Neil Parrott and John Concannon from the State Highway Administration will discuss the proposed removal of the town traffic light at the Union Bridge Town Council meeting Monday. They will answer questions from residents who have concerns about taking the traffic light down from Broadway and Main Street. The meeting will be held at 7 p.m. in Town Hall, 104 W. Locust St. Information: 410-775-2711. New Windsor to hold mayor, council elections New Windsor will hold elections for mayor and two council seats May 8. Town residents interested in running for either office should file a certificate of candidacy by April 9 by 5 p.m. at Town Hall on Main Street.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff writer | April 29, 1992
Momentum is building for a referendum to give residents a voice on the annexation of the Phillips property.Although the Town Council voted unanimously Monday to annex the 110-acre site north of town, residents could still have the final say. Referendum organizers have 45days to collect signatures from 20 percent of the town's 455 registered voters."
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2004
A public hearing will be held next month on New Windsor's proposed budget for the coming fiscal year, which would not raise taxes but would shift police duties from a resident state trooper to a deputy sheriff as a way of saving money. The savings could go toward a new volunteer fire company building. Councilman Neal Roop said the town's operating expenses would be $337,082 in fiscal 2005. About $62,000 has been allotted to the capital budget for items such as repairs to streets and Town Hall and new holiday decorations.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2003
Attempting to ensure that emergency vehicles can get to fire scenes on narrow roads, Hampstead officials are trying to strike a balance between public safety and parking convenience for residents. To make the narrower town roads more accessible to fire engines and snowplows, the town has proposed limiting parking to one side of four streets. "This is a tough balancing act on an issue that broaches public safety for people who have been able to park on the street for as long as they have owned their homes," said Mayor Haven N. Shoemaker Jr. "We are asking them to make a radical change."
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