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By PAT BRODOWSKI | November 23, 1994
Looking for Christmastown? Where Santa happily greets children and parents, where melodies ages old ascend from merry carolers, where the clip-clop of horses' hoofs strike a rhythm against the chatter of folks aboard the horse-drawn wagon?This Christmastown is not an invention. It's Manchester, and it starts Friday, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.Seventeen Manchester merchants have formed this year's annual Christmas Open House, said Sharon Nizer of Tin Rooster, which specializes in country home accessories.
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BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2008
Founded first by English settlers and soon after populated with an influx of German immigrants, the small town of Manchester thrived because of its location between Hanover, Pa., and Baltimore. Located in northeast Carroll County, Manchester has steadily grown from a small agricultural town to a popular destination for homeowners seeking large yards in a quiet setting. Manchester is known for its Main Street lined with local businesses and residences, but is also a ZIP code that includes vast farmland and stretches into northwest Baltimore County.
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NEWS
January 28, 1994
Mayor Earl A. J. "Tim" Warehime Jr. proclaimed the white oak the official tree of the town of Manchester during Wednesday's Town Council meeting."We have probably the second oldest white oak in the state," he said.That oak appears on the town seal.Manchester has a second connection with the white oak. The late Earl L. Yingling, a longtime town resident, was chief caretaker of the Wye Oak on the Eastern Shore.Councilwoman Charlotte Collett said yesterday the town may plant white oak seedlings as part of its Arbor Day celebrations this spring.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2004
With milk jugs, nets and high spirits, the fourth-graders in Betty L. Smith's science classes descended upon an outdoor laboratory that is only a short walk from their classroom at Manchester Elementary School. Forest, meadow, bogs, ponds and streams waited to be discovered - along with several miles of trails in the 69 acres that constitute Pine Valley Park and Charlotte's Quest Nature Center. "It's Manchester's Central Park," said Smith, who has served for six years on the board of the nonprofit Manchester Parks Foundation.
NEWS
February 3, 1993
Manchester seeks elections supervisorsManchester is looking for candidates for appointment to the Board of Supervisors of Elections, said town Clerk-Treasurer Paul Kolar.All three current board members' terms expire this year, Mr. Kolar said. Some of them may seek reappointment.Anyone interested in serving on the board should submit a letter of interest and a resume to: Town of Manchester, 3208 York St., P.O. Box 830, Manchester, Md. 21102.Deadline for receipt of the letters is Feb. 16.FIRE* Hampstead: Units from Hampstead responded to a truck fire on Hanover Pike at 11:12 p.m. Monday.
NEWS
August 4, 1997
The town of Manchester is working on updating a war memorial in front of Town Hall.The memorial will recognize those from the Manchester area who served in Korea, Vietnam, Desert Storm and other military conflicts. Several names of servicemen from World War II also are missing and need to be added.Applications are available in the town office for those who served in any war. Also needed is a duplicate of the DD No. 214 or discharge papers.The town had planned to rededicate the memorial in November, but has moved the date to 1998.
NEWS
August 1, 1996
The Maryland Department of the Environment will hold a public hearing at 7 p.m. Aug. 20 in the Manchester Fire Company activities hall regarding an application by the town of Manchester to supplement the town's municipal water supply.MDE officials said the town has applied to use a daily average of 69,700 gallons of water with a maximum daily average of 116,400 gallons of water during the month of maximum use. The water will be drawn from a well to provide a potable supply for 303 residential homes to be built on the 196-acre Manchester Farms estate on the southeast side of Bert Fowler Road, MDE officials said.
NEWS
April 28, 1997
The town of Manchester is updating its War Memorial in front of the Municipal Building on York Street.The memorial will include names of service people who served while living in the county's 6th Voting District.Donations from individuals, businesses or civic groups are being accepted to help with the upgrade.Donations can be sent to the Town Office, 3208 York St.The office has applications for anyone wishing to be included on the memorial.The town also is preparing a memorial to honor men and women from the Manchester Election District who served in the armed forces during any armed conflict (World Wars I and II, Korea, Vietnam, Persian Gulf, Bosnia, etc.)
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | August 18, 1993
Manchester resident Donald K. Becker Sr. said that runoff from a town street has been eroding his driveway since 1986, and he wants someone to take responsibility for fixing it.The driveway connects to the end of Crown Circle, at the bottom of a hill. During storms, Mr. Becker said, runoff from Crown Circle washes out the gravel driveway, creating gullies in it."This was so bad you couldn't drive on it," he said. "We had to drive on the grass."Mr. Becker said he has already added about six truckloads of gravel to the driveway, at $250 a truckload.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | February 16, 1993
The town of Manchester has received approval of a state grant of up to $20,000 for a facility to recycle yard waste into usable compost and mulch.Town Councilman Geoffrey S. Black said yesterday that the amount of the final grant, from the Maryland Department of the Environment, will depend upon how much the town puts up in matching funds. That, in turn, will depend upon what comes out of the town's budget process, which has just begun, he said."It's very much in the early planning stages," Mr. Black said.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1999
Henry L. Blevins, a Westminster developer who operated as Manchester Land Development Inc. in 1994, is suing the town of Manchester, charging that officials cost him millions of dollars by blocking his development of three subdivisions.The lawsuit filed this month in Carroll County Circuit Court by James A. Mogey, an Annapolis attorney representing Blevins, seeks $30 million in damages.In his suit, Blevins said the town blocked the development of 164 lots by "changing rules and specifications without notice" and by requiring him to perform work and procure materials that were not called for in the original public works agreement.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1998
A proposed bypass around the town of Manchester is introuble at the state level, Carroll's planning director told the County Commissioners yesterday, urging them to express their support again for the project."
NEWS
August 28, 1997
A Hampstead man accused of kidnapping a woman who lives at his home is being held on $25,000 bail at the Carroll County Detention Center after he was arrested early yesterday in Towson.Michael L. Hauck, 32, of the 1000 block of S. Main St. was charged by Hampstead police with kidnapping, second-degree assault and false imprisonment after he was turned over to them by Baltimore County police.In charging documents, Hampstead police said Hauck forced Penny L. Jones to get into his mother's car about 11: 45 p.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
August 4, 1997
The town of Manchester is working on updating a war memorial in front of Town Hall.The memorial will recognize those from the Manchester area who served in Korea, Vietnam, Desert Storm and other military conflicts. Several names of servicemen from World War II also are missing and need to be added.Applications are available in the town office for those who served in any war. Also needed is a duplicate of the DD No. 214 or discharge papers.The town had planned to rededicate the memorial in November, but has moved the date to 1998.
NEWS
April 28, 1997
The town of Manchester is updating its War Memorial in front of the Municipal Building on York Street.The memorial will include names of service people who served while living in the county's 6th Voting District.Donations from individuals, businesses or civic groups are being accepted to help with the upgrade.Donations can be sent to the Town Office, 3208 York St.The office has applications for anyone wishing to be included on the memorial.The town also is preparing a memorial to honor men and women from the Manchester Election District who served in the armed forces during any armed conflict (World Wars I and II, Korea, Vietnam, Persian Gulf, Bosnia, etc.)
NEWS
November 25, 1996
GROWTH IS AN ISSUE that consumes Carroll County, coloring virtually every decision made by its public officials. No area is immune from the obsession with this fundamental issue, whether one is for or against it.So it is no surprise that the venerable town of Manchester (population 3,000-plus) is earnestly considering an official limit to the number of inhabitants -- before growth really takes off and gets out of control.Town Manager David Warner proposes a population cap of 5,000 residents, to be included in revision of the municipality's master plan that is now under comprehensive review.
NEWS
June 28, 1993
The town of Manchester will buy 1,500 home recycling bins with part of a $20,000 grant received last winter from the Maryland Department of the Environment, the Town Council decided last week.Councilwoman Kathryn L. Riley, who oversees recycling for the council, said the town can get a price of $4.19 per bin by joining with the town of La Plata in Charles County to buy in quantity.The 18-gallon bins will cost a total of about $6,200. Half the cost will be paid out of the grant and half by the town.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | August 11, 1993
Manchester is trying to sort out problems plaguing its $4 million, state-of-the-art sewage treatment plant, which began operating in March.The facility disperses treated sewage effluent by spraying it over 70 acres of reed canary grass, where it acts as a fertilizer and the plants filter out some components of the effluent."
NEWS
August 1, 1996
The Maryland Department of the Environment will hold a public hearing at 7 p.m. Aug. 20 in the Manchester Fire Company activities hall regarding an application by the town of Manchester to supplement the town's municipal water supply.MDE officials said the town has applied to use a daily average of 69,700 gallons of water with a maximum daily average of 116,400 gallons of water during the month of maximum use. The water will be drawn from a well to provide a potable supply for 303 residential homes to be built on the 196-acre Manchester Farms estate on the southeast side of Bert Fowler Road, MDE officials said.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | March 8, 1995
Hampstead Town Manager John A. Riley will retire March 17 from his longtime job, but not from public service, he said yesterday."I would like to still stay in local government work of some sort," said Mr. Riley, who lives in Manchester. He will be 66 Tuesday.The talk in both towns has been that Mr. Riley is planning a run for mayor of Manchester. The election is in May."Time will tell," he said. "It's a possibility."The current mayor, Earl A. J. "Tim" Warehime, is a distant cousin of Mr. Riley's, and Manchester Councilwoman Kathryn Riley is his sister-in-law.
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