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By Janene Holzberg, jholzberg76@msn.com | August 25, 2013
An excursion train to transport passengers between Ellicott City and Baltimore via existing railroad tracks is one of the ideas being considered by a revamped Main Street organization. Uncovering the portion of the Tiber River that currently flows under a parking lot and transforming it into an attraction - instead of treating it like an asphalt-covered nuisance - is another. These two concepts are being discussed by the Ellicott City Historic District Partnership, which replaced the Ellicott City Restoration Foundation in June.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Annapolis Mayor Mike Pantelides dismissed the capital city's city manager on Wednesday, city officials confirmed. City manager Michael Mallinoff has been in his position since 2010, and previously served as director of the Department of Neighborhood and Environmental Programs. He also was city manager for Newport in Rhode Island. With Mallinoff's departure, assistant city manager Virginia Burke will become acting city manager while a national search for a replacement is conducted, city officials said.
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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1998
Manchester's mayor and Town Council named a college professor and retired elementary school principal as town manager last night.Philip L. Arbaugh, 50, of the 400 block of Cobb's Choice Lane in Westminster will succeed David M. Warner, who is retiring.Arbaugh was chosen from among 32 applicants, an increase from an earlier pool of 17, said Mayor Elmer C. Lippy Jr., who makes the appointment with council approval under the town's strong-mayor system."I'm happy to report after a start, and restart, that the mayor and Town Council have approved a new town manager after we sifted out four of the best of 32 candidates," Lippy said last night.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, jholzberg76@msn.com | August 25, 2013
An excursion train to transport passengers between Ellicott City and Baltimore via existing railroad tracks is one of the ideas being considered by a revamped Main Street organization. Uncovering the portion of the Tiber River that currently flows under a parking lot and transforming it into an attraction - instead of treating it like an asphalt-covered nuisance - is another. These two concepts are being discussed by the Ellicott City Historic District Partnership, which replaced the Ellicott City Restoration Foundation in June.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | July 12, 1995
Hampstead's Town Council returned one of Carroll County's best known environmentalists to public life last night.Neil M. Ridgely, former county landscape and forest conservation program manager, starts work Monday as Hampstead's newest town manager.An unsuccessful candidate for county commissioner last fall, Mr. Ridgely resigned from his county position in January and has been general manager of Clear Ridge Nursery in Union Bridge since February.The town manager position has technically been vacant since John A. Riley retired last spring.
NEWS
December 30, 1994
Within the past several weeks, two town managers in Carroll County have announced their resignations.Terry Short, Manchester's first and long-embattled manager, has resigned. Meanwhile, in Sykesville, much-loved manager James L. Schumacher is leaving in March to operate a consulting business. The timing of these resignations may be coincidental, but the reasons behind the departures of these municipal managers vastly differ.After almost three years of continual battles with a implacable faction on Manchester's council and a clique of residents, Mr. Short threw in the towel.
NEWS
August 30, 1993
The recent dismissal of Taneytown town manager Joseph A. Mangini is symptomatic of the tension that has been building between the part-time elected officials and the full-time appointed managers in Carroll County's towns.Just look at Manchester, where relations between the town manager and town council have been rocky for months. Or over in New Windsor, where the clerk-treasurer, who had 45 years of service and acted as the town manager, was replaced due to differences with the newly elected mayor.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | March 8, 1995
Hampstead Town Manager John A. Riley will retire March 17 from his longtime job, but not from public service, he said yesterday."I would like to still stay in local government work of some sort," said Mr. Riley, who lives in Manchester. He will be 66 Tuesday.The talk in both towns has been that Mr. Riley is planning a run for mayor of Manchester. The election is in May."Time will tell," he said. "It's a possibility."The current mayor, Earl A. J. "Tim" Warehime, is a distant cousin of Mr. Riley's, and Manchester Councilwoman Kathryn Riley is his sister-in-law.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | March 10, 1993
Jordan L. Harding, the town manager who helped move Crofton from isolation into the Anne Arundel mainstream, has resigned, effective the end of April, to pursue other job opportunities.While the 62-year-old Potomac resident said yesterday he simply wants to face new challenges, he conceded that he has faced criticism in recent months from members of the Crofton Civic Association board who, he said, second-guessed his decisions.But he said the complaints, which he called "petty," had no bearing on his decision, which he announced to the board during a closed meeting Monday.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | November 11, 1994
A petition from some Manchester residents to fire the town manager has no legal significance for the man's contract, Town Attorney Charles O. Fisher Jr. said.And Councilwoman Charlotte Collett said the problems the petition lists are the fault of the divided council, not Town Manager Terry Short."I think the Town Council needs to be able to make a decision and tell [the town manager] what to do," Mrs. Collett said."The big issue is our Town Council at the time does not know government," she said.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | November 27, 2012
The Sykesville Town Council voted Monday night, Nov. 26, to maintain the town's contract for a U.S. Post Office, and the town will plan to hire at least two new employees to operate it. The decision does not guarantee the post office's future, however, as the council plans to address its fate again during next year's town budget talks. It was a decision that pleased the full house, where many stated the importance of the post office to the town for not only its services, but also for its atmosphere.
EXPLORE
May 23, 2011
SYKESVILLE — After moving a building called the Norwood Avenue House from Norwood Avenue to the William "Mac" McElroy parking lot on Oklahoma Avenue, refurbishing it, then spending more than a year trying to recruit a bank to open a branch there, the town of Sykesville is now entertaining the possibility of selling the structure. The house was initially moved to make way for an improved parking lot between Norwood Avenue and Main Street. The move and renovation were paid for with grant money the town received from the state.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | August 26, 2007
Baltimore police Sgt. Craig Gentile retired this month after 22 1/2 years, half of that with the vice squad. After some 5,000 prostitution arrests and 1,000 gambling busts, he has a few stories to tell. He says he's saving them for the book. But keep him on the phone long enough and he starts talking. "I did carry a stripper over my shoulder into the station one night, yeah, that happened," he volunteered. "I did dress up as Santa, yeah, that happened. I did get a city vehicle one night and close the street and say I was out there working for the water department.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | January 19, 2007
Barbara L. Swann, who recently retired as Crofton's town manager after nearly four decades as an employee of the Anne Arundel County community, died from complications of brain and lung cancer Tuesday at her home there. She was 72. Mrs. Swann had been town manager since 1993. She unofficially stepped down from her job in September, because of failing health, and retired at the end of the year. "She was a real institution in the Crofton area. She and her husband had been active in community affairs and she was a faithful worker for the special benefits tax district," County Councilman Edward R. Reilly said yesterday.
NEWS
By SUSAN GVOZDAS and SUSAN GVOZDAS,Special to The Sun | December 29, 2006
After working for Crofton for 36 years, Town Manager Barbara Swann is officially stepping down Sunday. Unofficially, Swann left her job of the last 13 years in September, when she became too sick to work. Swann, 71, has been getting radiation and chemotherapy on and off for two years for brain and lung cancer. Until this year, she attended every community Easter egg hunt since 1985. She organized the Fourth of July parades, Christmas tree lightings and town cleanups. "She really is Ms. Crofton," said David Lombardo, a former board member and president of the Crofton Civic Association from 1984 to 1988.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | October 8, 2006
Just as Westminster's new city manager took office last week, Mount Airy voted to hire its former planner as the town's first administrator. These day-to-day administrators come on board as Carroll County's two most populated municipalities struggle to balance residential development with limited water resources. Margaret "Marge" Wolf, the deputy housing secretary under former Gov. Parris N. Glendening, started as Westminster's new manager on Monday. She managed the borough of Kennett Square, Pa., and also previously served as Hyattsville's city administrator.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | March 18, 1994
In 1986, during Oliver Davis' first year as a Mount Airy councilman, the town's trash collectors didn't show up for work one day.As head of the town's sanitation committee, Mr. Davis was responsible for solving the problem."
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2006
Sykesville, a town of about 4,500 on the border between Carroll and Howard counties, has a vibrant downtown, a rich railroad history and a charming riverfront. Trading on those amenities should help the town draw its residents and visitors to its varied businesses, restaurants and attractions. Town officials have started the Warfield Corporate and Culture Center, a $20 million business enterprise in former state hospital buildings along Route 32. They have worked to restore a one-room schoolhouse as an African-American museum, a companion to the Gatehouse Museum, which houses town memorabilia.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | February 5, 2006
Sykesville breaks ground tomorrow on nearly $600,000 in additions that will create a spacious meeting room in its Town House and double the size of its police station. The town hopes to keep construction costs down by serving as its own general contractor with Mayor Jonathan Herman overseeing the work. "We are getting local subcontractors to bid individually on the various aspects of this job," said Herman, who owns a building restoration business. "This way we can lower the costs in segments."
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