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By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | November 30, 1993
The Hampstead Town Council enacted an ordinance last night that bans discharging weapons, including bows and arrows, within town limits.The council voted 4-1 to adopt the measure, which has few exceptions. Councilman Arthur Moler opposed the ordinance.Before the council voted, the panel amended -- and then deleted -- a controversial section that would have allowed target practice with any weapons, including guns, on private property "in such a manner as to not endanger persons or property."
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NEWS
SPECIAL TO THE AEGIS | June 19, 2013
This Friday, June 21, at 10 a.m., Habitat for Humanity Susquehanna, Inc. will cut the ribbon on the "House That Bel Air Built," located at 404 Giles Street in Bel Air. This will be the 71st home HHS has built since its inception in 1993 and the first constructed in the Bel Air town limits. The House That Bel Air Built is the future home of Roger and Holly Crouse and their seven children. The Crouse family is one of more than 200 families Habitat has served throughout Harford and Cecil counties in the organization's 20-year history, Habitat for Humanity Susquehanna said in a news release announcing dedication of the home.
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NEWS
February 16, 2005
Hampstead will hold elections for three council positions from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. May 10 at Town Hall, 1034 S. Carroll St. Deadline to register to vote in the town election is April 11. Registration forms and absentee ballots are available from Town Hall. Anyone interested in running for Town Council should visit Town Hall for an application. Candidates must be at least 25 years old, have lived within town limits for the past year and be a registered voter. Proof of age, residency and citizenship is required.
EXPLORE
July 11, 2012
As taken from the pages of The Aegis dated Thursday, July 12, 1962: The Town of Bel Air grew by 249 acres as a result of a property annexation acquired by the Commissioners of Bel Air. The property known as "The Homestead," a 300-acre farm, was divided into three parcels. One was owned by the Bel Air Methodist Church, one by the Hanover-Baltimore Corporation and the remainder under contract to the Homestead Development Company, whose plan was to construct a large housing development.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1998
The county commissioners decided yesterday to offer municipal law enforcement agencies a police mutual aid agreement similar to one signed last month with the mayor and Town Council of Sykesville.That agreement, which clarified the circumstances during which municipal officers may leave town limits to render assistance, was made formal in a written agreement. Previously, towns presumed they were covered for liability under the state's mutual aid laws until Sykesville raised the issue about four years ago.No municipal officers have been injured outside town limits while assisting another police agency, but officials in Sykesville wanted assurances that its officers had sufficient coverage.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | March 13, 1994
Sykesville will close part of its Town Council meeting tomorrow at the request of Police Chief Wallace P. Mitchell."The chief asked for a closed session to discuss a matter brought up at the last council meeting," said Town Manager James L. Schumacher, who sets the agenda. "This concerns personnel privacy."Chief Mitchell wants to review police policy on responding to calls outside the town limits, said Mr. Schumacher.To close the session, the council must take a vote. Members may reopen the meeting and make council deliberations public.
NEWS
August 1, 1997
Manchester officials are seeking bids for construction of a well and pumping services to develop a ground water supply on a tract outside town limits.Manchester is working to expand its water supply. The town has phased out two of its three springs, but uses four wells. It is looking to build a fifth well.Officials want to develop a fifth well on the Wayne Thomas property north of town. A study by R. E. Wright and Associates of Frederick predicted the site would be a good producer, said Mayor Elmer C. Lippy.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | July 9, 1993
Hampstead town officials met with officials of the Carroll County Bureau of Water Resource Management last night to discuss protecting potential town water supplies through the year 2020.County staff have identified 13 potential well sites that could serve the town in the future, said Catherine M. Rappe, bureau chief.The questions now, Ms. Rappe said, are whether the town wants protect these sites, many of which are outside the town limits, and how that can be done."It sounds simple," Ms. Rappe said at the meeting in the Hampstead Town Hall.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | December 3, 1993
The New Windsor Town Council has voted to annex the land on which the Brethren Service Center plans to build a retirement village.The council had stalled on the issue of extending the town limits to include the 6.63-acre parcel, which lies along Springdale Road.Council members were concerned that the Heifer Project International animal barn on the property would violate a town law that prohibits raising farm animals within town limits.But Town Attorney Marker J. Lovell told the council at its Wednesday night meeting that the land could be annexed to the town without violating the law because the agricultural use of the land was permitted before the land became part of the town.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1999
Hampstead town officials are negotiating with the Cordish Co. of Baltimore to acquire land for a water tower north of a Wal-Mart outlet the developer is building.But first, the Town Council would have to vote next month to amend the town code to allow property outside the town limits to use public water.Under the proposed agreement, the town would extend its water system to Cordish's North Carroll Shopping Center in exchange for slightly less than an acre for the water tower, two wells and money to build a pump house and main to connect to the town's water supply.
NEWS
February 16, 2005
Hampstead will hold elections for three council positions from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. May 10 at Town Hall, 1034 S. Carroll St. Deadline to register to vote in the town election is April 11. Registration forms and absentee ballots are available from Town Hall. Anyone interested in running for Town Council should visit Town Hall for an application. Candidates must be at least 25 years old, have lived within town limits for the past year and be a registered voter. Proof of age, residency and citizenship is required.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2003
For a month of weekends, Glenn Ireland took pictures. He shot parking lots, playgrounds and ball fields, railroad tracks and hiking trails. And, with the town of Sykesville preparing to celebrate its centennial, he photographed its houses. Every one of them. "I probably took 2,000 shots of everything you can see from the road, everything and then some," said Ireland, a computer systems engineer by day and self-taught amateur photographer in his spare time. "It was a great opportunity to see the whole town.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2002
Hampstead leaders expressed irritation yesterday after members of the Carroll County Planning Commission objected to significant aspects of a proposed plan for land use in and around the town. Town leaders and county planning staff have spent two years composing the plan, which would change land-use designations from residential to agricultural for hundreds of properties outside town limits. The designations need to be changed to limit sprawling developments that would strain Hampstead's infrastructure, town officials said.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1999
Hampstead town officials are negotiating with the Cordish Co. of Baltimore to acquire land for a water tower north of a Wal-Mart outlet the developer is building.But first, the Town Council would have to vote next month to amend the town code to allow property outside the town limits to use public water.Under the proposed agreement, the town would extend its water system to Cordish's North Carroll Shopping Center in exchange for slightly less than an acre for the water tower, two wells and money to build a pump house and main to connect to the town's water supply.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1999
Sykesville Police Department would like to "beef up" its mutual aid agreement with the county by deputizing officers called to emergencies outside town limits, said town Police Chief Wallace P. Mitchell. "We want to deputize officers so they can go out into the county," said Mitchell in a meeting with the county commissioners yesterday. "It would mean more police efficiency. We want to make this agreement stronger and provide a safer atmosphere for our citizens." Sykesville "may send personnel and/or equipment to aid the requesting party to the extent consistent with the efficient operation," according to the agreement signed last year by the town and the county commissioners.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1999
The town that built itself a $100,000 skateboard park has enacted a law to keep most skaters there.Mount Airy has created several no-skate zones effective immediately.The town opened a $100,000 skateboard park last month in Watkins Park and has drawn a steady crowd of enthusiasts since, most of them 12 to 16 years old. The 14,000-square-foot recreational area features rails, ledges, two miniramps, five quarter-pipes and two half-pipes, one of which is 6 feet high and 40 feet wide.Still, some skaters continue to glide across senior citizens' porch steps and use the town's Main Street on the way to the park off Route 27. They are disrupting businesses and frightening senior citizens, officials said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1999
Sykesville Police Department would like to "beef up" its mutual aid agreement with the county by deputizing officers called to emergencies outside town limits, said town Police Chief Wallace P. Mitchell. "We want to deputize officers so they can go out into the county," said Mitchell in a meeting with the county commissioners yesterday. "It would mean more police efficiency. We want to make this agreement stronger and provide a safer atmosphere for our citizens." Sykesville "may send personnel and/or equipment to aid the requesting party to the extent consistent with the efficient operation," according to the agreement signed last year by the town and the county commissioners.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Bill Talbott and Mary Gail Hare and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writers | March 20, 1994
The five Carroll County towns that maintain their own police forces do not hesitate to respond when a call for assistance comes from outside town limits, according to spokesmen for those departments."
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1999
North Baltimore residents are exploring another way to block a proposed development of cottages and townhouses: convince historic preservationists that their neighborhood should be designated an old mill town and hope this forces city officials to think twice about the plan.The option emerged yesterday as community leaders in Lake Falls and Poplar Hill continued voicing concerns over a plan by Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse, Inc. to develop 9 acres of woods just east of Falls Road, below the Baltimore County line.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1998
The county commissioners decided yesterday to offer municipal law enforcement agencies a police mutual aid agreement similar to one signed last month with the mayor and Town Council of Sykesville.That agreement, which clarified the circumstances during which municipal officers may leave town limits to render assistance, was made formal in a written agreement. Previously, towns presumed they were covered for liability under the state's mutual aid laws until Sykesville raised the issue about four years ago.No municipal officers have been injured outside town limits while assisting another police agency, but officials in Sykesville wanted assurances that its officers had sufficient coverage.
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