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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2000
A tight labor market has prompted Taneytown officials to propose a hefty 6 percent pay increase for all 30 full- and part-time town employees in next year's budget. "It's an employee's market," said Taneytown Mayor Henry C. Heine Jr. Finding and keeping good workers is so difficult, the mayor said, that city officials had decided to raise the salaries for new employees. It didn't seem fair, they said, not to also raise the salaries of those on the payroll, Heine said. The city will raise salaries without raising the tax rate, however, because growth and alternative sources of funds are helping city coffers grow, said City Manager Charles P. "Chip" Boyles Jr. Like other Carroll towns, Taneytown has had trouble hiring and keeping police officers, although the 10-person force is fully staffed now. But a search for a certified wastewater treatment plant operator has taken about a year, Boyles said, and the city has two such positions open.
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EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | November 27, 2012
The Sykesville Town Council voted Monday night, Nov. 26, to maintain the town's contract for a U.S. Post Office, and the town will plan to hire at least two new employees to operate it. The decision does not guarantee the post office's future, however, as the council plans to address its fate again during next year's town budget talks. It was a decision that pleased the full house, where many stated the importance of the post office to the town for not only its services, but also for its atmosphere.
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NEWS
October 2, 1997
PoliceUnion Bridge: Town employees told police that someone threw stones or other objects, disabling a lock and denting a steel door at Union Bridge Community Center. Damage was estimated at $200.Pub Date: 10/02/97
EXPLORE
January 10, 2012
The Bel Air Town Commissioners failed to muster a four-fifths majority last week needed to give the town's 90 employees a 2 percent pay raise. Three of the five town commissioners — Ed Hopkins, Susan Burdette and Rob Preston — favored giving the raises; the other two — Dave Carey and Rob Reier — voted no. It's easy to argue either side in this matter. Town employees were denied a 1.5 percent raise last year and they are as entitled as anyone to be rewarded for their service.
NEWS
May 3, 1993
Manchester may give 3% pay increasesThe Manchester Town Council, still wrestling with the town budget for fiscal 1994, agreed on a working proposal for handling town employees' salaries at a work session Wednesday night.Councilman Geoffrey S. Black said a tentative agreement would grant all town employees a 3 percent pay increase.In addition, the council tentatively decided to form a committee to decide which town positions are underpaid, based on salaries paid in nearby towns. The committee has until July 1 to complete the task, Mr. Black said.
NEWS
By Staff report | May 3, 1993
Manchester Councilman Geoffrey S. Black said about eight town employees spoke at an executive session of the Town Council last week.Mayor Earl A. J. "Tim" Warehime Jr. and the council invited town employees to the closed Tuesday night meeting in a memo dated April 26. The memo said the purpose of the meeting was to receive comment, criticism and other information relevant to town government.The memo said the meeting was closed because "it is quite possible that matters involving personnel may be mentioned and/or discussed."
EXPLORE
January 10, 2012
The Bel Air Town Commissioners failed to muster a four-fifths majority last week needed to give the town's 90 employees a 2 percent pay raise. Three of the five town commissioners — Ed Hopkins, Susan Burdette and Rob Preston — favored giving the raises; the other two — Dave Carey and Rob Reier — voted no. It's easy to argue either side in this matter. Town employees were denied a 1.5 percent raise last year and they are as entitled as anyone to be rewarded for their service.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | March 26, 1993
Asked yesterday why there were some sharp exchanges at the Manchester Town Council's budget work session Wednesday, Councilman Gerald H. Bollinger said, "We were talking about money."The proposed budget for fiscal 1994 was introduced during the council meeting before the work session. The council members then set out to try to wrestle it into more final form.When Town Manager Terry Short presented recommendations for raising town employees' salaries, Councilman John A. Riley said, "I just can't see this kind of pay increase.
NEWS
June 22, 1993
An aura of contrariness has descended on the Manchester Town Council. At its last meeting, Councilman Robert Kolodziejski, who has been absent from several meetings, said he was "disgusted" with the behavior of several of his colleagues during his absence. He correctly called for his fellow council members to behave in a more collegial fashion.Bickering among the members has increased to the level where simple administrative tasks, such as determining the best format for the treasurer's report or who should do the printing of the new ordinances, have become battle royals.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | January 17, 1991
The Crofton Civic Association has boosted cost-of-living increases for all town employees to 5 percent, reversing an earlier decision to give employees 3 percent raises.The association's Dec. 10 decision had been opposed by town police officers -- who also had their overtime pay reduced and their bonuses eliminated -- and by town residents, many of whom showed up at Monday's meeting to protest the earlier ruling.But Civic Association president Ed Dosek said the board was not swayed by the community.
NEWS
December 27, 2010
This morning at 5 a.m. as I lay under my electric blanket listening to the wind howl, I heard another sound — the snow plow, driven by one of the town employees. At other times, I've heard the sound of jackhammers at 3 a.m. as the public works department employees repaired a broken water main. My garbage gets collected rain or shine, snow, cold, heat, etc. Last February after three snowstorms in eight days, two of them blizzards, I read on-line gripes posted by people from their warm homes complaining because their streets weren't plowed fast enough.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | November 26, 2006
For years, the turreted building so familiar on North Main Street was referred to as the castle. But after decades of gradual decline and neglect, the Lt. Gen. Milton A. Reckord Armory more resembled a dungeon. That changed during the past six months, when Bel Air used a $220,000 state grant to renovate the two-story granite structure, transforming it from a shabby and limited gathering place into a revitalized, much-needed community center. "In the '60s and '70s, this building was the town focal point," said Christopher Schlehr, town administrator.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2000
A tight labor market has prompted Taneytown officials to propose a hefty 6 percent pay increase for all 30 full- and part-time town employees in next year's budget. "It's an employee's market," said Taneytown Mayor Henry C. Heine Jr. Finding and keeping good workers is so difficult, the mayor said, that city officials had decided to raise the salaries for new employees. It didn't seem fair, they said, not to also raise the salaries of those on the payroll, Heine said. The city will raise salaries without raising the tax rate, however, because growth and alternative sources of funds are helping city coffers grow, said City Manager Charles P. "Chip" Boyles Jr. Like other Carroll towns, Taneytown has had trouble hiring and keeping police officers, although the 10-person force is fully staffed now. But a search for a certified wastewater treatment plant operator has taken about a year, Boyles said, and the city has two such positions open.
NEWS
October 2, 1997
PoliceUnion Bridge: Town employees told police that someone threw stones or other objects, disabling a lock and denting a steel door at Union Bridge Community Center. Damage was estimated at $200.Pub Date: 10/02/97
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1996
Town leaders in Manchester are facing some major strategy decisions before drafting a budget for fiscal 1997.Mayor Elmer Lippy and the Town Council will consider re- organizing the town staff and implementing a 10-step salary scale, as recommended by David Warner, Manchester's temporary part-time town manager.Mr. Warner gave his ideas to town leaders several months ago but met with what he termed an "unenthusiastic" response.The revised plan, presented at a recent Town Council meeting, summarized his ideas for streamlining management of the town.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | June 4, 1995
A "new guard" eager to exert more control on development introduced two more ordinances at a special Hampstead Town Council meeting Friday night.It is highly unusual for town governments to meet on Friday nights, but it's the second time since the election in May that Hampstead's council has done so.Newly elected Mayor Christopher M. Nevin said the council wanted to hold discussions on the ordinances before public hearings later this month and to give town...
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | June 7, 1993
Manchester's water and wastewater superintendent will receive a 19 percent pay raise beginning July 1, says Town Manager Terry Short.The final town employees' salary plan for fiscal 1994 will give Mr. Short a pay raise of 8.4 percent, and other town employees will receive 8 percent increases, he said.The town manager's salary will rise from $31,200 to $33,821. The water and wastewater superintendent's salary will increase from $25,958 to $30,900.Former Councilman Geoffrey Black, who helped set the final employee pay increases before his term ended in May, said Friday that Steven Miller, the water and wastewater superintendent, had been "grossly underpaid."
NEWS
October 6, 1991
Name: Kenneth Russell Sr.Honored by The Carroll County Sun for: Serving Hampstead as a police officer for the past 10 years, first asa patrolman and later as police chief since 1986Age: 58Residence; hometown: Finksburg; BaltimoreEducation: Graduate of Patterson Park High School in BaltimoreFamily: Wife: Charlotte B., 57, employed as a saleswoman at the Clothes Cellar inGlyndon; three children, Kenneth Jr., 37, Cindy, 32, and John, 30; athird son, Steven, died...
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Sun Staff Writer | May 21, 1995
A story in the May 21 edition of The Sun for Harford County incorrectly reported action May 18 by the Bel Air Town Commissioners. The board reduced the budget for legal expenses from $80,000 to $72,000.Also, a sentence paraphrasing Town Commissioner Mara Devine Pais' views regarding savings that could be attained if lawyers were consulted only on an as-needed basis was incorrect. She did not cite a specific figure for the cost savings.The Sun regrets the errors.Bel Air town employees will get a 2 percent bonus instead of a cost-of-living allowance in the next fiscal year, while town commissioners decide whether the 100 workers are being paid too much or too little.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | November 11, 1994
A petition from some Manchester residents to fire the town manager has no legal significance for the man's contract, Town Attorney Charles O. Fisher Jr. said.And Councilwoman Charlotte Collett said the problems the petition lists are the fault of the divided council, not Town Manager Terry Short."I think the Town Council needs to be able to make a decision and tell [the town manager] what to do," Mrs. Collett said."The big issue is our Town Council at the time does not know government," she said.
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