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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | April 9, 1994
ALFORD, LINCOLNSHIRE -- The not-quite-undisputed world's loudest town crier and his latest challenger bellowed like wounded water buffaloes in a high noon shout-out at the Corn Exchange in this old market town."
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NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | May 31, 2009
Once upon a time, in a kingdom known as Baltimore, lived the Princess Sheila, known not so much far and wide but among those near and dear for her generosity. Although the king, a lad named Martin, ruled the land, she watched out for her closest subjects - her sister Janice, personal exchequer Dale and the dashing Ronald of Doracon, who always came bearing gifts and liked to build big things hither and yon. The princess made sure they wanted for nothing: She took care of Mildred of Utech, who employed Janice; she found work in the castle for Dale; and she made Ronald her vassal, helping him to partake of the royal coffers to build on his fiefdoms.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | May 4, 2008
David McKee, looking like a Revolutionary-era Santa Claus in his well-made costume and graying beard, clanged his handbell yesterday afternoon and quickly got the attention of the crowd gathered before him: "Taxpayers of Maryland," bellowed the town crier of Brantford, Ontario, "beware." He told the tale - in just a few artful stanzas - of a new contraption called the telephone invented in his hometown. He dismissed it as a "toy" the governor of Maryland wanted installed in his mansion in the late 19th century.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | May 4, 2008
David McKee, looking like a Revolutionary-era Santa Claus in his well-made costume and graying beard, clanged his handbell yesterday afternoon and quickly got the attention of the crowd gathered before him: "Taxpayers of Maryland," bellowed the town crier of Brantford, Ontario, "beware." He told the tale - in just a few artful stanzas - of a new contraption called the telephone invented in his hometown. He dismissed it as a "toy" the governor of Maryland wanted installed in his mansion in the late 19th century.
NEWS
June 28, 2000
NEIGHBORHOOD Web pages are a dime a dozen these days in the metropolitan area. But Bolton Hill's redesigned electronic town crier is so good its ideas merit consideration -- and copying -- by other communities. Most neighborhood Web pages have two problems: Their information is either too skimpy or too stale to be useful. This was the case with boltonhill.org, too, until the site was redesigned recently. The new version, which is still being perfected, provides the most functional neighborhood clearinghouse we have seen in Baltimore.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 10, 2002
SOMEWHERE in the great crowds that swarmed across Fells Point's cobblestones last weekend, Jack Trautwein puffed out his chest. He is the community's human link between now and then. While the bustling neighborhood seems to revitalize itself by the hour, Trautwein goes back to its first great hour, the War of 1812, and his summer role as its Town Crier. "Wonderful, wonderful," Trautwein, 64, was saying this week, in the afterglow of the annual Fells Point Festival. An estimated 750,000 people attended.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | May 31, 2009
Once upon a time, in a kingdom known as Baltimore, lived the Princess Sheila, known not so much far and wide but among those near and dear for her generosity. Although the king, a lad named Martin, ruled the land, she watched out for her closest subjects - her sister Janice, personal exchequer Dale and the dashing Ronald of Doracon, who always came bearing gifts and liked to build big things hither and yon. The princess made sure they wanted for nothing: She took care of Mildred of Utech, who employed Janice; she found work in the castle for Dale; and she made Ronald her vassal, helping him to partake of the royal coffers to build on his fiefdoms.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1999
A mugging victim with a keen sense of smell recently put Baltimore police on the scent of a cologne-reeking suspect authorities believe is responsible for 22 robberies on one residential edge of downtown.Credit for catching a suspect with a fondness for Calvin Klein's Obsession goes to city police and a new crime-fighting tool: an e-mail network linking 400 Bolton Hill residents with frequent updates on suspicious activity -- from grand larceny to misappropriated trash cans.Today, police and residents are taking bows for their vigilance -- and the construction of the electronic town crier -- within a historic Baltimore neighborhood of 1870 houses, marble steps, deep windows, lace curtains and corner churches.
BUSINESS
By JUNE ARNEY and JUNE ARNEY,SUN REPORTER | May 23, 2006
Bob Niles has been selling entertainment for years. Much of the time, he did it from Rockefeller Center as a high-powered executive with NBC. But these days his home base is Baltimore, and his mission more local. Niles' new job as executive director of the Mount Vernon Cultural District is to establish a brand for the neighborhood, to bring in more visitors and to get them to stay longer. "It's an area that invites you to slow down and enrich your life by taking in what's around you," said Niles, 57. "It's a very special urban, cultural village.
NEWS
June 15, 2007
Above, Peter Davies, town crier of Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, practices his bell-ringing aboard the Bluenose II, docked at the Naval Academy. The replica of the schooner that won the first America's Cup completes its visit today and moves on for a two-day stopover in Baltimore. At left, members of the Musique 400 Troupe dance with visitors. Phil Roberts plays the fife.
BUSINESS
By JUNE ARNEY and JUNE ARNEY,SUN REPORTER | May 23, 2006
Bob Niles has been selling entertainment for years. Much of the time, he did it from Rockefeller Center as a high-powered executive with NBC. But these days his home base is Baltimore, and his mission more local. Niles' new job as executive director of the Mount Vernon Cultural District is to establish a brand for the neighborhood, to bring in more visitors and to get them to stay longer. "It's an area that invites you to slow down and enrich your life by taking in what's around you," said Niles, 57. "It's a very special urban, cultural village.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 10, 2002
SOMEWHERE in the great crowds that swarmed across Fells Point's cobblestones last weekend, Jack Trautwein puffed out his chest. He is the community's human link between now and then. While the bustling neighborhood seems to revitalize itself by the hour, Trautwein goes back to its first great hour, the War of 1812, and his summer role as its Town Crier. "Wonderful, wonderful," Trautwein, 64, was saying this week, in the afterglow of the annual Fells Point Festival. An estimated 750,000 people attended.
NEWS
June 28, 2000
NEIGHBORHOOD Web pages are a dime a dozen these days in the metropolitan area. But Bolton Hill's redesigned electronic town crier is so good its ideas merit consideration -- and copying -- by other communities. Most neighborhood Web pages have two problems: Their information is either too skimpy or too stale to be useful. This was the case with boltonhill.org, too, until the site was redesigned recently. The new version, which is still being perfected, provides the most functional neighborhood clearinghouse we have seen in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1999
A mugging victim with a keen sense of smell recently put Baltimore police on the scent of a cologne-reeking suspect authorities believe is responsible for 22 robberies on one residential edge of downtown.Credit for catching a suspect with a fondness for Calvin Klein's Obsession goes to city police and a new crime-fighting tool: an e-mail network linking 400 Bolton Hill residents with frequent updates on suspicious activity -- from grand larceny to misappropriated trash cans.Today, police and residents are taking bows for their vigilance -- and the construction of the electronic town crier -- within a historic Baltimore neighborhood of 1870 houses, marble steps, deep windows, lace curtains and corner churches.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | April 9, 1994
ALFORD, LINCOLNSHIRE -- The not-quite-undisputed world's loudest town crier and his latest challenger bellowed like wounded water buffaloes in a high noon shout-out at the Corn Exchange in this old market town."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 9, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- A man who lived near Nicole Brown Simpson told jurors yesterday how, shortly before midnight June 12, Mrs. Simpson's nervous, purposeful pet Akita dog pulled him toward its owner's condominium, stopped in front and peered into the yard.HTC When the neighbor looked for himself, he said, he saw Mrs. Simpson prostrate and "full of blood.""I turned to my wife and said there was a dead person there," the witness, Sukru Boztepe, told Marcia Clark, the chief prosecutor in the case.
FEATURES
August 11, 1991
The town of Leesburg, Va. will step back in time 200 years at the annual "August Court Days" Saturday and next Sunday. August was time when the court was in session and a time for much socializing and merrymaking.The streets of Leesburg will be blocked to traffic and transformed into a street fair of colonial times with a town crier announcing the day's events, wandering minstrels, mimes, troubadours, and over 100 craftspeople. A reenactment play on the courthouse lawn recalls local events in 1791.
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