Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTown Charter
IN THE NEWS

Town Charter

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | January 27, 1994
The Institute for Governmental Service of the University of Maryland is working with the town of Manchester on revisions to the town charter and the town code.The institute helps governments throughout the state with applied research and consulting, said institute Director Barbara S. Hawk.The town is paying the institute $500 for work to update its charter and $800 for work to revise the town code, plus expenses.On Dec. 13, Ms. Hawk sent Town Manager Terry Short a first draft of a revised charter, containing the institute's preliminary recommendations and some ideas from the town staff.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
In the quaint town of New Windsor, officials have sold the municipal ball fields to a cement company, purchased a dilapidated inn with taxpayer money for development that hasn't happened and stuck residents with the bill for a nearly $5 million wastewater treatment plant. While the town council is up for election next year, angry residents aren't waiting to express their displeasure. They're pushing a measure to allow the recall of local officials. Petitioners say they aren't targeting the entire council or any one official: They want their petition campaign to send a message to all. "We are not Occupy New Windsor," said Rebecca Merson, who moved to Atlee Ridge, one of the town's new developments, in 2004.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | January 27, 1994
In a work session last night on revisions to the Manchester town charter, the Town Council began to shift power to the office of the mayor.After a brief business meeting, the council met to consider the first draft of revisions to the town charter. When the charter revision is completed, the town code will also be revamped.Three council members said last night they favor rescinding a key provision of a controversial charter amendment passed last year. That amendment increased the council's power to fire the town manager, at the expense of the mayor's power.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2001
New Windsor Town Council went into executive session last night to discuss whether Councilman Paul G. Garver is still a town resident and could keep the seat he won in 1999, after a tied election. Garver, whose residency became an issue after a letter appeared in the Carroll County Times during the holidays, joined the mayor and council in the closed session. Garver, 50, whose family has lived in New Windsor for generations, declined to comment before the session. Councilman Neal Roop made a motion to keep the meeting open, but it failed for lack of a second.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | February 16, 1993
The Hampstead Town Council will be busy tonight with midwinter legal housecleaning.The town code has never been officially adopted as law, Mayor Clint Becker said yesterday. Changing that is one of several chores facing the council at its 7:30 p.m. meeting in the town hall.Until now, each ordinance the council has enacted has become law. But the code, the compilation of all the ordinances, has not been officially adopted, said Richard Murray, of Walsh and Fisher, the law firm that represents Hampstead.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1999
When two candidates for Town Council tied in the New Windsor election last week, town officials were perplexed when they discovered the town charter had no provision for such an occurrence. After consulting legal authorities, the council Wednesday night voted 3-1 to resolve the tie by choosing incumbent Paul Garver over challenger Samuel Pierce. "Everyone would have preferred a runoff election, but the law doesn't let you do it," said Mayor Jack A. Gullo Jr. "Who wanted to have to deal with this?
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2001
New Windsor Town Council plans to meet soon to weigh a contention that one of its members has moved out of town. The residency of Councilman Paul G. Garver, a 50-year-old native of the Carroll County town, has been questioned by Sam R. Pierce, the man with whom Garver tied in the May 1999 town elections. Without a provision in the Town Charter to break the tie, the council - following its attorneys' advice - declared a vacancy and named the incumbent Garver to fill it. Garver "should step forward and resign his seat on the council," Pierce said, because the town code requires that "a councilperson shall maintain a permanent residence in the town during their term of office."
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2001
New Windsor Town Council went into executive session last night to discuss whether Councilman Paul G. Garver is still a town resident and could keep the seat he won in 1999, after a tied election. Garver, whose residency became an issue after a letter appeared in the Carroll County Times during the holidays, joined the mayor and council in the closed session. Garver, 50, whose family has lived in New Windsor for generations, declined to comment before the session. Councilman Neal Roop made a motion to keep the meeting open, but it failed for lack of a second.
NEWS
February 27, 1991
Town Attorney John T. Maguire II introduced several changes to the town charter at Monday's council session.The resolutions, recommended by a charter review committee, will be adopted at the March 25 session and subject to referendum for 40 days following adoption. Residents can read the full charter with the proposed amendments at the town office.Maguire also said he had nothing new to report on the town's application for a state grant to hook Bowman Springs homeowners into the town water system.
NEWS
August 15, 2000
After a brief discussion, Sykesville Town Council appointed last night Russ Vreeland, an accountant who has worked on the town budget and economic development committees, to fill a vacancy on the six-member panel. "Russ Vreeland has volunteered for the town and has been actively involved," said Mayor Jonathan S. Herman. "He understands the issues and as a CPA, he certainly can help with our fiscal responsibilities." Vreeland, a Norris Avenue resident, was named to fill the seat vacated by Councilman William Hall, elected to his third four-year term last year.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2001
New Windsor Town Council plans to meet soon to weigh a contention that one of its members has moved out of town. The residency of Councilman Paul G. Garver, a 50-year-old native of the Carroll County town, has been questioned by Sam R. Pierce, the man with whom Garver tied in the May 1999 town elections. Without a provision in the Town Charter to break the tie, the council - following its attorneys' advice - declared a vacancy and named the incumbent Garver to fill it. Garver "should step forward and resign his seat on the council," Pierce said, because the town code requires that "a councilperson shall maintain a permanent residence in the town during their term of office."
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2000
More than a year after an unprecedented tie vote for one council seat, the town of New Windsor still lacks a mechanism to handle the situation if it ever arises again. With an election in May, town officials want residents to suggest possible solutions at the next regular council meeting, Nov. 1. "Maybe you'd like arm-wrestling, or a duel," said Mayor Jack A. Gullo Jr., joking at a recent council meeting. Gullo also announced the results of ballots he sent to the five council members, asking them to rank their top three suggestions for selecting a council member when the vote is tied.
NEWS
August 15, 2000
After a brief discussion, Sykesville Town Council appointed last night Russ Vreeland, an accountant who has worked on the town budget and economic development committees, to fill a vacancy on the six-member panel. "Russ Vreeland has volunteered for the town and has been actively involved," said Mayor Jonathan S. Herman. "He understands the issues and as a CPA, he certainly can help with our fiscal responsibilities." Vreeland, a Norris Avenue resident, was named to fill the seat vacated by Councilman William Hall, elected to his third four-year term last year.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2000
PRINCEVILLE, N.C. -- Five months after the worst flooding in North Carolina's history, many homes in this historic town remain uninhabitable, most businesses are closed, and junked cars and other debris litter yards. But Princeville residents will take a break from cleanup efforts Sunday to celebrate the town's 115th birthday. Ignoring the event, they say, isn't an option. "It's important to have a birthday celebration because even though there are not but a few citizens living there now, we still are a town," said Commissioner Linda Worsley.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1999
More than two dozen residents turned out last night for a report on possible solutions if a tie vote were to occur again in a New Windsor election -- as it did in May for the first time in the town's 155 years.Had the town held a run-off election, it could have been sued -- and would have lost -- because there is no provision in its charter for another election, said Neal M. Janey, a municipal law expert who was asked to research the situation.Last night, Janey outlined the report prepared after the town election May 11 produced a tie for one of three open council seats.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1999
When two candidates for Town Council tied in the New Windsor election last week, town officials were perplexed when they discovered the town charter had no provision for such an occurrence. After consulting legal authorities, the council Wednesday night voted 3-1 to resolve the tie by choosing incumbent Paul Garver over challenger Samuel Pierce. "Everyone would have preferred a runoff election, but the law doesn't let you do it," said Mayor Jack A. Gullo Jr. "Who wanted to have to deal with this?
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2000
More than a year after an unprecedented tie vote for one council seat, the town of New Windsor still lacks a mechanism to handle the situation if it ever arises again. With an election in May, town officials want residents to suggest possible solutions at the next regular council meeting, Nov. 1. "Maybe you'd like arm-wrestling, or a duel," said Mayor Jack A. Gullo Jr., joking at a recent council meeting. Gullo also announced the results of ballots he sent to the five council members, asking them to rank their top three suggestions for selecting a council member when the vote is tied.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1999
More than two dozen residents turned out last night for a report on possible solutions if a tie vote were to occur again in a New Windsor election -- as it did in May for the first time in the town's 155 years.Had the town held a run-off election, it could have been sued -- and would have lost -- because there is no provision in its charter for another election, said Neal M. Janey, a municipal law expert who was asked to research the situation.Last night, Janey outlined the report prepared after the town election May 11 produced a tie for one of three open council seats.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1999
Every vote counts, a fact made clear last week when two candidates tied in a race for New Windsor Town Council -- a first in the town's 155-year history.The development nonplussed officials when they discovered that nothing in the town charter addressed such an outcome.Wednesday night, the Town Council voted 3-1 to resolve the tie by choosing incumbent Paul Garver over challenger Samuel Pierce."Everyone would have preferred a runoff election, but the law doesn't let you do it," said Mayor Jack A. Gullo Jr. "Who wanted to have to deal with this?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.