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NEWS
December 24, 2011
One Maryland shore town is deciding whether to create a municipal website. Commissioners of Mardela Springs tell the Daily Times of Salisbury that they're considering a website to promote open government and to keep residents informed about events and meetings. The town currently spreads information by mailing out monthly newsletters. Commission president Stanford Robinson says the town is concerned about possible startup costs. He says it won't be able to start the site if it would cost the town $400 to $500 a year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
As school assemblies go, this one was a winner. Austin Machin listened to a Blue Angels pilot speak for an hour at the Dundalk and Sollers Point high schools Friday, walked out and said, "I am at a loss for words about how awesome that was. " The 16-year-old wants to join the Navy SEALs right out of high school, and for him, the pilot was about as good a recruitment tool as he could imagine. Students from Dundalk and Sollers Point had dozens of predictable questions for Blue Angels pilot Lt. Mark Tedrow, who is in town for the Star-Spangled Spectacular, a celebration of the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Baltimore and the writing of what would become the national anthem.
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NEWS
April 21, 2014
After 50 years living in Ocean City and being a community "icon," I have strong positive feelings about the reality and the family town perception of Ocean City , Maryland ( " Ocean City ranked as one of the least safe places to live in Maryland," April 16). Ocean City is a solid, laid-back little town that respects values and personal dignity. In today's world, that is a real outstanding feature that can't be found many places. Summer in Ocean City evokes a pleasurable feeling in hundreds of thousands of people.
ENTERTAINMENT
David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
In reaction to fallout from the Ray Rice video posted Monday on TMZ, CBS Sports has pulled its scheduled opening song by Rihanna from tonight's premiere of "Thursday Night Football" featuring the Ravens and Pittsburgh Steelers. The telecast was supposed to open each week with Jay-Z's Grammy-winning "Run This Town" performed by Rihanna. It's the CBS answer to NBC's "Waiting All Day For Sunday Night" with Carrie Underwood. The opening was to also include narration from actor Don Cheadle highlighting the rivalry between the two teams and their towns.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2012
Don't miss Susan Reimer's story in Wednesday's Taste section on deviled eggs. It's not about making them yourself. It's about ordering them up in restaurants. They're quite the thing these days, and Reimer's story takes in the deviled eggs at Woman's Industrial Kitchen and Woodberry Kitchen, where Spike Gjerde is using a recipe borrowed, with a few tweaks, from his mother-in law. "Otherwise, it is just the classic mayonnaise, Gulden's mustard, salt and pepper," Gjerde said.  "And a tiny bit of fish pepper powder that we make here.
NEWS
April 4, 2011
I'm in the minority and I'm proud of it. I like my Ravens and am supportive of the team. What differentiates me is that I love my Orioles and have done so since childhood. This as a plea to the local Ravens fans to be supportive of the "other" ball team in town. My wish is that those fans who infuse energy into M&T Bank Stadium do the same to Camden Yards this spring and summer. The support we show the baseball team this season would be very much appreciated by the organization and the staunch fans who have stuck in there through the very lean years.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
"Gone, but not forgotten" is the nostalgic slogan adopted by organizers of Discover Daniels Day, a one-time event Saturday that will mark 40 years since the last remnants of the town of Daniels were demolished by Tropical Storm Agnes. Haven't heard of Daniels? You're not alone. The picturesque and bustling mill town, with manufacturing roots dating to the early 19th century, was located four miles north of Ellicott City at a bend in the Patapsco River and straddled the northeastern Howard County border into Baltimore County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley | mary.mccauley@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 14, 2010
When actor Wil Love first visited the fictitious burg of Grover's Corners, the town showed him what he was good at. Now, playwright Thornton Wilder's make-believe small town is teaching him how to gradually let go. In a career spanning more than four decades, Love, now 67, has played more than 250 roles. But his first part was in a Wichita, Kan., high school staging of Wilder's classic piece of Americana, "Our Town," in 1959. "Like your first love, you never forget your first production," Love says.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | July 24, 2012
Former Oriole Luke Scott, who is on the Tampa Bay Rays' disabled list with a strained oblique, was at Camden Yards on Tuesday -- his second series back since signing a free-agent deal with the Tampa Bay Rays. And he said he hopes his old team -- and his new one -- can stay in playoff contention all season. "This is such a great baseball town, so I think it is great," said Scott, who played four seasons with the Orioles and was Most Valuable Oriole in 2010. "I'm really happy for them.
NEWS
By Rus VanWestervelt | May 5, 2014
Timonium resident and poet Ann Kolakowski says that what she discovered when her grandmother turned 99 has haunted her to this day. Now, nearly 12 years later, she has published a book of poetry about that discovery. "When my brothers and I were clearing out our grandmother's home when she moved to an assisted living facility," said Kolakowski, "I found a shabby notebook. I opened it and read, 'Marian Brown, Domestic Science/Warren School, Maryland.' I was really confused. " In fact, the town in which her grandmother, Florence Marian Brown Eichler, had spent her childhood and attended Warren School had been bought, razed and flooded in 1921 to create a municipal water supply.
NEWS
By Christina Davidson | September 9, 2014
My father's Ohio hometown was named after a battle in Bladensburg, Md. Aug. 24, 1814, where my 4-times-great grandfather, Samuel Davidson, fought against the invading British. American cultural identity worships valor and victory, and my history teachers always skimmed the War of 1812, so I grew up assuming Bladensburg, Ohio commemorated a glorious triumph. After moving to D.C. in my 20s, I finally learned Bladensburg was a humiliating disaster that scarcely impeded the British march to burn Washington.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
With the shooting of an unarmed teenager in Missouri weighing on their minds, politicians, church leaders and members of the public gathered Tuesday night at a Northwest Baltimore Church to consider police brutality. The Rev. Jamal-Harrison Bryant, pastor of the Empowerment Temple, where the event was held, said that the death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. could be a landmark in the history of African-American activism. In the future, Bryant said, people will ask one another, "Where were you and what did you do when Michael Brown was killed?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Bartlett Pear Inn is the name of Alice and Jordan Lloyd's boutique inn on Harrison Street in Easton. It's also the name of their wonderful-in-every-way restaurant on the inn's first floor. It is a superb restaurant. The atmosphere is serene and relaxing, the service achieves a rare balance of proficiency and warmth, and the food is consistently satisfying. There are moments of culinary drama, mostly at the beginning, when your senses need stimulation, and at the end, when you want a finale to whistle about on the sidewalk.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Baseball commissioner Bud Selig contends that the Mid-Atlantic Sports Network television rights dispute between the Orioles and the Washington Nationals can be resolved before he leaves office in January and that both Baltimore and Washington, D.C., are viable candidates to host an All-Star Game in the near future. Perhaps more important for Orioles fans, Selig said the two issues are not connected - that there is no consideration in holding the All-Star Game hostage from either franchise if the MASN legal entanglement continues.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
The weekend begins on Wednesday nights in Annapolis with the blast of a starting gun. That's when dozens of sailboats jockeying in the Severn River harbor head to the starting line for the Annapolis Yacht Club's Wednesday night races, a summer tradition in this waterfront community since the 1960s. What began as "beer can races" - just a casual event to break up the week - has become serious business for the sailors, as well as for City Dock bars and restaurants. "This is real sailing," said Bobby Frey, the yacht club judge who runs the races, which are perfect for the competitive sailors who don't have the time to travel the country to regattas.
SPORTS
By Liz Clarke and The Washington Post | August 4, 2014
RICHMOND, Va.  - Since suiting up for training camp July 23, the Washington Redskins have practiced in shells and in full pads. They've held walk-throughs and collided in live drills. They've worked on fundamentals and practice plays scripted for the red zone. They've squared off one-on-one, seven-on-seven and 11-on-11. Now comes an opponent more authentic than a tackling sled and quicker to stoke competitive fires than a teammate. Coach Jay Gruden's hope is that three days of joint practice with the New England Patriots heading into the teams' preseason opener Thursday at FedEx Field will challenge his players anew while giving his coaching staff another means of judging who's worth keeping on the 53-man roster.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
At the Music Cafe on Ridge Road, the restaurant local residents call the hippest in town, owner Randy Anderson says he's thrilled he'll soon be able to add beer and wine to his menu for the first time. A few blocks away, at the down-home Red Rooster restaurant just off Main Street, owner Pat Miller says she'd sooner close her 10-seat establishment than serve booze. "I don't need the problems that would bring. I thought things were just fine the way they were," she says. This week, residents of this rural town of about 15,000 in upper Montgomery County finally put to bed a question that has divided the community since 1884: Should it allow the sale of alcohol or not?
FEATURES
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
The former owner of the Senator theater said Friday that he is not leaving town and giving away his worldly possessions. A "Curb Alert" ad was posted under Tom Kiefaber's name Thursday on Craig's List. It was republished Thursday to the social news and entertainment website Reddit, and offered seats, light fixtures, projector equipment and movie memorabilia, all for free. "[G]ood ol' Kiefaber is leaving town for good," the ad said. Kiefaber said the ad was not his doing, and he's not moving.
NEWS
August 2, 2014
Two town hall meetings presenting the implementation of new curfew hours for Baltimore children left many attendees with serious unanswered questions ( "Residents see some gray areas in city's new curfew," July 21). While the mayor's presenting panel gave passionate testimony as to why the curfew is being enacted, the people of Baltimore were not allowed the time nor given the respect we were expecting. One member of the audience did ask for more time for the community to have input before the curfew start date, but that question was not answered.
NEWS
July 31, 2014
The limits of growth has been a constant theme in Towson news over recent years, mostly focusing on major redevelopment downtown. Meanwhile, the same issue is also a sore spot a little farther south - around Towson University. The discomfort over "boom town" expansion felt by residents near Towson's core is shared by residents of Rodgers Forge, which borders TU. The current flash point has been discussion over a proposed $2 million in improvements to a softball field. TU officials say the upgrade is necessary for the university to meet equal facilities requirements under Title IX. Worrisome to Rodgers Forge residents is part of the design that includes an electrical conduit, which they fear could mean the installation of lights in the future - a hot button issue in the suburban enclave.
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