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By SYLVIA BADGER | May 5, 1995
Life can be exciting for the executive producer of cable television's Learning Channel, Mary Ellen Iwata, best known in Baltimore from her days of producing Channel 13's "Evening Magazine." She recently returned from a most productive business trip to the South of France, which included a business meeting with Britain's Prince Edward. According to Ms. Iwata, the meeting went so well the prince invited her to have dinner with him, and the dinner went so well that he has agreed to work with the Learning Channel on a world premiere series, "Haunted Castles in England."
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By Rosemary McClure and Rosemary McClure,Los Angeles Times | October 14, 2007
LONDON -- The cobblestone street is dark and slick from a drizzly rain; the clouds are heavy and low, swallowing the steeple of nearby Christ Church Spitalfields. But light spills from the Ten Bells. Inside the corner pub, lagers and ales are being poured, and a dozen patrons are drinking, laughing and lounging on tattered couches and at the dark-wood bar. More than 100 years ago, during what came to be called the Autumn of Terror, serial killer Jack the Ripper stalked this small pub in London's East End. Two of his victims were thought to have walked out its door into a night of horror.
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SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 28, 1996
LONDON -- Well, there was at least one team of ravens that had a good year.Protected by royal decree, beloved by tourists, the ravens at the Tower of London didn't disappoint their millions of fans in 1996. ,, They simply showed up and frolicked every day inside the medieval fortress by the Thames River.Too bad football teams don't run as smoothly as these eight birds.Yesterday, Baltimore Ravens executive vice president David Modell showed up at the Tower of London to pay his respects and learn about the world's most famous ravens.
FEATURES
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 23, 2004
LONDON - The most printable nickname thrust upon the tall, curved greenish building in Southeast London is "the Gherkin," so called because of its resemblance to one of those way-big pickles you can't quite get out of the jar with fingers alone. Hardly a refined label for the first building in more than a quarter-century to significantly alter one of the world's most architecturally sophisticated skylines. The nickname has stuck, beating back others that were more anatomical than vegetable, but it is not used as a weapon of ridicule.
FEATURES
January 25, 2000
Be a 4Kids Detective When you know the answers to these questions, go to www.4Kids.org/detectives/ What kind of rock is limestone? (Go to www.fi.edu/ fellows/ payton/rocks/ to find out.) Which Frenchman built the Tower of London? Grimms' tales have appeared in how many languages? ENCHANTED STORIES Join the Grimm brothers for a journey through the landscape of 17th-century Germany and for stories that are sure to let your imagination run wild. The enchanted forests of Europe await you at www.nationalgeographic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 11, 2004
The Executioner Always Chops Twice: Ghastly Blunders on the Scaffold, by Geoffrey Abbott. St. Martin's Press. 239 pages. $17.95. Faced with wanton slaughter at home and apparently carefree torture in such venues as Saddam Hussein's Iraq and Cambodia, it's tempting to believe we live in an era of exceptional brutality. Much history tells us otherwise: Cruelties and methods of killing that are now virtually unimaginable were commonplace and condoned by church and state in centuries past.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 11, 1996
I recently heard that the Tower of London's collection of armor will be housed in a new museum. Can you provide details? Is the Tower itself launching any exhibitions that focus on weaponry?For more than 450 years, the collection of arms and armor belonging to the Royal Armories has been displayed in the White Tower at the Tower of London. Limited space at the Tower meant that only 10 percent of the 43,000-piece collection could be viewed.On March 20, a new $66 million, 25,000-square-foot Royal Armories Museum in Leeds will open.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | August 17, 1995
LONDON -- During 10 centuries of looming over the Thames River, the Tower of London has been a palace, prison, place of execution and repository of the Crown Jewels.Now, it's the site of a simmering labor dispute involving the world's most famous tour guides.The Yeoman Warders, known world-wide as the Beefeaters, are downright upset that their bosses have proposed lowering the retirement age from 65 to 60.The 38 guardians of the tower may wear comic opera outfits that go back centuries, but underneath their costumes, they're unionized civil servants.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | October 11, 1993
The question was simple: What is your favorite place in Baltimore?Asked this, the people I spoke with skipped over the Inner Harbor and nominated the spots they consider special -- some of them blurring boundaries with neighboring counties.Some thought of green grass, others architecture, some about people and a few the spots where they earn a living. Here goes:George Washington, long-time Sun cab driver who lives in West Baltimore: "Druid Hill Park. I like to go there and see all the people using it. I've always liked Druid Hill Park."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 11, 1996
LONDON -- In his first weeks as potential savior of the London Monarchs football team, William "The Refrigerator" Perry has waded through the world-famous food stalls at Harrods, been interviewed by a man in drag on national television, taken in the sights from Big Ben to the Tower of London and squeezed in a night at the theater, enduring the long-running hit "Miss Saigon.""Too much singing for me," says Mr. Perry. "And too much crying."The Fridge is back, bigger, if not better than ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 11, 2004
The Executioner Always Chops Twice: Ghastly Blunders on the Scaffold, by Geoffrey Abbott. St. Martin's Press. 239 pages. $17.95. Faced with wanton slaughter at home and apparently carefree torture in such venues as Saddam Hussein's Iraq and Cambodia, it's tempting to believe we live in an era of exceptional brutality. Much history tells us otherwise: Cruelties and methods of killing that are now virtually unimaginable were commonplace and condoned by church and state in centuries past.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 10, 2003
Strange adventure! Maiden wedded to a groom she's never seen ... Groom about to be beheaded in an hour on Tower Green." That, in a nutshell, explains the setup of Gilbert and Sullivan's 11th collaboration out of a remarkable 14 operettas, The Yeomen of the Guard, which is being revived by the Young Victorian Theatre Company for its 33rd season over the next two weekends. The plot, however, only begins to explain this work and its attractions. G&S aficionados have always ranked Yeomen among the best of the lot, though it is the least typical, largely eschewing the musical and theatrical slapstick that spark H.M.S.
TRAVEL
By Sheila McCauley and Sheila McCauley,Sun Staff | April 23, 2000
Most people take their child to work. I took mine to London. One day last year, a friend decided on a whim to fly to Paris for a few days with his wife. His cheap air-hotel package and my own envy got me thinking about taking my son on a similar trip. The timing seemed right. Off-season fares were amazingly cheap, my 9-year-old son still tolerated my company, and we had been through a difficult winter and needed some fun. My friends thought I was nuts to take Owen to a foreign country by myself.
FEATURES
January 25, 2000
Be a 4Kids Detective When you know the answers to these questions, go to www.4Kids.org/detectives/ What kind of rock is limestone? (Go to www.fi.edu/ fellows/ payton/rocks/ to find out.) Which Frenchman built the Tower of London? Grimms' tales have appeared in how many languages? ENCHANTED STORIES Join the Grimm brothers for a journey through the landscape of 17th-century Germany and for stories that are sure to let your imagination run wild. The enchanted forests of Europe await you at www.nationalgeographic.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 28, 1996
LONDON -- Well, there was at least one team of ravens that had a good year.Protected by royal decree, beloved by tourists, the ravens at the Tower of London didn't disappoint their millions of fans in 1996. ,, They simply showed up and frolicked every day inside the medieval fortress by the Thames River.Too bad football teams don't run as smoothly as these eight birds.Yesterday, Baltimore Ravens executive vice president David Modell showed up at the Tower of London to pay his respects and learn about the world's most famous ravens.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 11, 1996
LONDON -- In his first weeks as potential savior of the London Monarchs football team, William "The Refrigerator" Perry has waded through the world-famous food stalls at Harrods, been interviewed by a man in drag on national television, taken in the sights from Big Ben to the Tower of London and squeezed in a night at the theater, enduring the long-running hit "Miss Saigon.""Too much singing for me," says Mr. Perry. "And too much crying."The Fridge is back, bigger, if not better than ever.
FEATURES
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 23, 2004
LONDON - The most printable nickname thrust upon the tall, curved greenish building in Southeast London is "the Gherkin," so called because of its resemblance to one of those way-big pickles you can't quite get out of the jar with fingers alone. Hardly a refined label for the first building in more than a quarter-century to significantly alter one of the world's most architecturally sophisticated skylines. The nickname has stuck, beating back others that were more anatomical than vegetable, but it is not used as a weapon of ridicule.
TRAVEL
By Sheila McCauley and Sheila McCauley,Sun Staff | April 23, 2000
Most people take their child to work. I took mine to London. One day last year, a friend decided on a whim to fly to Paris for a few days with his wife. His cheap air-hotel package and my own envy got me thinking about taking my son on a similar trip. The timing seemed right. Off-season fares were amazingly cheap, my 9-year-old son still tolerated my company, and we had been through a difficult winter and needed some fun. My friends thought I was nuts to take Owen to a foreign country by myself.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 11, 1996
I recently heard that the Tower of London's collection of armor will be housed in a new museum. Can you provide details? Is the Tower itself launching any exhibitions that focus on weaponry?For more than 450 years, the collection of arms and armor belonging to the Royal Armories has been displayed in the White Tower at the Tower of London. Limited space at the Tower meant that only 10 percent of the 43,000-piece collection could be viewed.On March 20, a new $66 million, 25,000-square-foot Royal Armories Museum in Leeds will open.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | August 17, 1995
LONDON -- During 10 centuries of looming over the Thames River, the Tower of London has been a palace, prison, place of execution and repository of the Crown Jewels.Now, it's the site of a simmering labor dispute involving the world's most famous tour guides.The Yeoman Warders, known world-wide as the Beefeaters, are downright upset that their bosses have proposed lowering the retirement age from 65 to 60.The 38 guardians of the tower may wear comic opera outfits that go back centuries, but underneath their costumes, they're unionized civil servants.
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