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By Gilbert Sandler | May 2, 1995
THERE'S JUST a parking lot at the northwest corner of Baltimore Street and Guilford Avenue now. Eventually, there may be a building there. But, no matter what's built on that spot, it probably won't ever mean as much to the city's history as the building that occupied that spot for most of this century -- the Tower Building. The crowning glory of this most impressive building was a huge outdoor clock. Many downtown workers recall checking the Tower Building's clock to find out when their lunch hour was over.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
Gregory J. Alexander and Paul Kelsey Williams have combed through photo archives, and the result of their labors is "Lost Baltimore," which is a painful reminder of notable buildings that fell victim, for the most part, to fire or urban renewal. They also expand the "lost" concept to include sports teams, businesses, entertainment venues and even the weekly chore of scrubbing marble steps that has largely vanished. Alexander and Williams have included a cross-section of commercial structures as well as the once-grand estates of Guilford, Ulman, Bolton and the Wyman Villa, which were demolished to make way for new neighborhoods.
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FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1998
The Tower Building, which stood in the 200 block of East Baltimore Street from 1912 until its lamentable destruction in 1986, was a graceful, clock-crowned confection that soared some 18 stories into the air and was a landmark on the city's horizon.With its adjoining five-story main building, the complex, built by the Maryland Casualty Co., was home for years to lawyers, accountants, real estate brokers and the city's Bureau of Markets.Designed by Otto Simonson and costing $300,000, the tower, The Sun predicted it would be "one of the handsomest in the South."
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2001
Workers hung from harnesses 370 feet above Bill Yarbrough, bolting steel to steel as he tried to explain why anyone would want to spend eight hours a day with his head very nearly in the clouds. "It's dangerous," acknowledged the telecommunications consultant, "but it kind of gets in your blood. "Every time you pass a tower, you want to get back and do it again." That fearlessness built Howard County's newest emergency communications tower, a 400-footer in Savage that was topped Friday.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | April 15, 1994
Nearly two dozen commercial properties, including the site of the old Tower Building downtown, will be auctioned June 7 as a marketing tool used to move distressed properties in other cities makes its Baltimore debut."
NEWS
October 13, 1990
A Mass of Christian burial for Joseph V. Flaccomio, a retired real estate agent, will be offered at 10 a.m. today at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5200 N. Charles St.Mr. Flaccomio, who was 86, died Thursday at his home on East Melrose Avenue after a long illness.He retired about 15 years ago from Russell T. Baker & Co., now Coldwell Banker, after being associated with the firm since the late 1940s.During World War II, he worked as a safety engineer at the Key Highway shipyard of the Bethlehem Steel Corp.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Edward Gunts contributed to this article | October 19, 1995
A bill that would allow the city to condemn several buildings in the 300 block of E. Baltimore St. has aroused the ire of preservationists, who say some of the structures are historic and should be preserved.Demolition would clear the way for a proposed parking garage. The proposal is to come before the Planning Commission at a hearing today.Construction of a parking garage was stipulated in the lease that Alex. Brown Inc. negotiated with the city and the owners of Commerce Place across the street, where the investment firm will consolidate its offices.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | May 5, 1992
TELEVISION coverage of the Orioles' games these days finds the camera reaching out beyond the stadium to make the point that the stadium is, happily, located downtown, well within the old city. Frequently, the camera finds its way to, and comes to rest at, the old Bromo Seltzer Tower building -- sans the "blue bottle." All of which has been leading to suggestions from fans (and this newspaper) to the city fathers that they "bring back the blue bottle."That's not a bad idea, but it will take some doing.
NEWS
By Gil Sandler | February 23, 1999
WITH the announcement that there are plans to raze a dozen buildings near the old Stewart's department store building at Howard and Lexington streets for offices, residences, shops and parking, Baltimore can expect to see another battle of two well-known factions.On one side, are those who say that the buildings are uniquely tied to our identity as a city, making them too valuable to lose. Some call such advocates the "romantics." On the other side, are the "realists," who say this plan will revitalize the west side of downtown.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | February 9, 1993
THE Downtown Partnership of Baltimore has hired 35 "public safety guides" to work the streets, starting March 1, as goodwill ambassadors and tour guides. They'll be joined by 28 "clean and sweep ambassadors," all part of an effort to spiff up the old city.I'm all for it. Downtown Baltimore, for all its much publicized noise and traffic and panhandlers and crime, remains the undisputed nerve center of the area's business community. It is also the metropolitan area's cultural heart. Here's an early Valentine to downtown!
NEWS
By Gil Sandler | February 23, 1999
WITH the announcement that there are plans to raze a dozen buildings near the old Stewart's department store building at Howard and Lexington streets for offices, residences, shops and parking, Baltimore can expect to see another battle of two well-known factions.On one side, are those who say that the buildings are uniquely tied to our identity as a city, making them too valuable to lose. Some call such advocates the "romantics." On the other side, are the "realists," who say this plan will revitalize the west side of downtown.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1998
The Tower Building, which stood in the 200 block of East Baltimore Street from 1912 until its lamentable destruction in 1986, was a graceful, clock-crowned confection that soared some 18 stories into the air and was a landmark on the city's horizon.With its adjoining five-story main building, the complex, built by the Maryland Casualty Co., was home for years to lawyers, accountants, real estate brokers and the city's Bureau of Markets.Designed by Otto Simonson and costing $300,000, the tower, The Sun predicted it would be "one of the handsomest in the South."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1996
THE FOUR-story building next to the Shot Tower in Baltimore has been home to a candy factory, a German restaurant and a discotheque, among other establishments. This spring, it has found new life as the statewide headquarters for a nonprofit organization that works to improve life for children and families.The Pressley Ridge Schools, a 164-year-old organization that teaches adults to be foster parents of "troubled and troubling" children and sponsors classes in "family preservation," acquired the building at 805 E. Fayette St. last fall for $525,000.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Edward Gunts contributed to this article | October 19, 1995
A bill that would allow the city to condemn several buildings in the 300 block of E. Baltimore St. has aroused the ire of preservationists, who say some of the structures are historic and should be preserved.Demolition would clear the way for a proposed parking garage. The proposal is to come before the Planning Commission at a hearing today.Construction of a parking garage was stipulated in the lease that Alex. Brown Inc. negotiated with the city and the owners of Commerce Place across the street, where the investment firm will consolidate its offices.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | May 2, 1995
THERE'S JUST a parking lot at the northwest corner of Baltimore Street and Guilford Avenue now. Eventually, there may be a building there. But, no matter what's built on that spot, it probably won't ever mean as much to the city's history as the building that occupied that spot for most of this century -- the Tower Building. The crowning glory of this most impressive building was a huge outdoor clock. Many downtown workers recall checking the Tower Building's clock to find out when their lunch hour was over.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | June 15, 1994
The fate of the Tower Building site in downtown Baltimore is still up in the air as its owners continue talks with an unidentified bidder who offered more than $2 million for the three-fifths-acre parcel.The site, at Guilford Avenue and Baltimore Street, was the highest-profile property offered in last week's regional commercial real estate auction conducted by Michael Fox Auctioneers of Pikesville and Columbia-based Manekin Corp.The Tower site is one of six properties offered in the June 7 auction where talks between owners and bidders are continuing.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | June 15, 1994
The fate of the Tower Building site in downtown Baltimore is still up in the air as its owners continue talks with an unidentified bidder who offered more than $2 million for the three-fifths-acre parcel.The site, at Guilford Avenue and Baltimore Street, was the highest-profile property offered in last week's regional commercial real estate auction conducted by Michael Fox Auctioneers of Pikesville and Columbia-based Manekin Corp.The Tower site is one of six properties offered in the June 7 auction where talks between owners and bidders are continuing.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | August 5, 1993
Five years have passed since Baltimore's historic Tower Building was dismantled for "future development." Gone, too, are the McCormick spice factory, News American headquarters and Allied-Signal plant.But all of them can still be seen at the Top of the World Observation Level and Museum, the popular lookout on the 27th floor of the World Trade Center at 401 E. Pratt St.Since it opened in 1979, the observation level has featured photographic panels that replicate the views visitors see from the five-sided building, billed as the world's largest pentagon.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | April 15, 1994
Nearly two dozen commercial properties, including the site of the old Tower Building downtown, will be auctioned June 7 as a marketing tool used to move distressed properties in other cities makes its Baltimore debut."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | August 5, 1993
Five years have passed since Baltimore's historic Tower Building was dismantled for "future development." Gone, too, are the McCormick spice factory, News American headquarters and Allied-Signal plant.But all of them can still be seen at the Top of the World Observation Level and Museum, the popular lookout on the 27th floor of the World Trade Center at 401 E. Pratt St.Since it opened in 1979, the observation level has featured photographic panels that replicate the views visitors see from the five-sided building, billed as the world's largest pentagon.
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