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By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com | February 22, 2010
Ryan Boddy was following instructions. After back-to-back snowstorms, Boddy dug out his wife's car on Calvert Street in Mount Vernon, a snow emergency route. Posted signs state cars would be towed from 9 p.m. to 9 a.m. on the east side of the street, and from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on the west side, so he parked it on the east side the morning of Feb. 11. Still, he walked out a few hours later and found the vehicle had been towed. Boddy said he understood that this was an unprecedented storm and "it makes sense that they wouldn't have this down to a science."
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NEWS
By Mark Puente, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
After serving eight months in federal custody for his role in a towing scandal, former Baltimore police officer David Reeping is fighting to get his job back. Reeping contends that investigators used him as a scapegoat to avoid accusations of racial profiling from Hispanic and African-American officers convicted in the scandal, according to a complaint filed with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. "I was the token 'Caucasian' to stack the deck against them," Reeping told the commission, according to a copy of the claim obtained by The Baltimore Sun. A city lawyer called Reeping's allegations "absurd" and urged the commission to reject the claim, according to his correspondence with the commission.
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NEWS
August 9, 1995
Richard Smith read carefully the Taneytown community newsletter which explained that the street sweepers would come through July 18. He moved his car.It was towed anyway, costing him $52.The problem wasn't with Mr. Smith, but the street sweepers who didn't get the job done July 18. By the time police posted "No Parking" signs for July 19 about 9 p.m. the night before, Mr. Smith already had parked his car for the evening.The next morning his car was gone."That was wrong," Mayor W. Robert Flickinger said.
NEWS
April 28, 2014
It's a heart-sinking feeling to return to your parking space and find your car gone. Maybe you noticed the sign warning that the lot was only for patrons of a particular business, but you figured, hey, there are plenty of open spaces, and I'll only be gone for a little while. Maybe the business was even closed. No harm, right? Next thing you know, you're shelling out for a cab to an impound lot somewhere - and then shelling out a whole lot more in fees to get your car back. The efficiency of the trespass towing business in Baltimore can seem awfully heartless when you're on the wrong end of it. But think about it from the other perspective for a moment.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | June 26, 1993
An Ellicott City woman whose pickup truck was mistakenly towed during the repossession of another vehicle is suing General Motors Acceptance Corp. for $100,000 to pay for her losses and humiliation, according to a lawsuit she filed.Suzanne Ferrone of the 8600 block of Town and Country Blvd. alleges she had to cancel her plans for Memorial Day weekend and suffered humiliation in knowing her boss and co-workers thought she couldn't keep up with her vehicle payments.She also had to cancel her bank accounts because her purse was in the 1987 Nissan truck when it was towed from a Catonsville parking lot outside Home Depot USA Inc., where she works, the suit alleges.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | July 25, 2000
THE WOMAN on the telephone at Greenwood Towing Inc. had a voice full of early-morning weariness. It was only Monday, and she sounded as if she wanted to go home and hide under the covers for the rest of the decade. "Let me assume," she said, "that you're calling about the cars that were towed over Artscape weekend." Bingo! The city opens its arms in all the most beautiful ways with Artscape, its annual love song to itself, but turns this delightful hour into a punch in the mouth every time the cops, or the tow trucks, decide to get picky.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2003
Across the city last week, hundreds of residents whose cars were parked on snow emergency routes failed to heed warnings to dig out their vehicles and move them elsewhere. So now those car owners are digging into their pockets to pay hefty fines and towing fees. More than 2,000 citations were issued and more than 800 cars were towed during Baltimore's history-making snowstorm that dumped more than two feet of snow here, said Adrienne Barnes, spokeswoman for the Office of Transportation.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons | November 27, 1990
The 30-foot carcass of a whale that was found drifting at the mouth of Curtis Bay early yesterday took up a berth at the Dundalk Marine Terminal while officials and scientists decide what to do with it.The dead whale was spotted drifting in open water in the main channel of the Patapsco River, said Cpl. Ralph L. Parker of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources Police.Corporal Parker said the DNR assisted in handling the case but didn't have a boat large enough to pull the whale to shore.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2001
An elderly, disabled woman wrapped in a blanket was found safe yesterday afternoon in the back seat of a Jeep Cherokee after it was towed about half a mile from a downtown curb to a city impound lot because of a parking violation, police said. The driver of the Jeep - identified by police as Diahann Russell of Columbia - told an officer she had parked about 3 p.m. in the first block of S. Calvert St. to visit a lawyer's office, leaving her passenger in the vehicle. The downtown section of Calvert Street is part of a tow-away zone after 3 p.m. Police did not know the name of the passenger - described as 75 to 80 years old - or her relation to the driver, who could not be reached for comment last night.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1996
Parking near the Timonium fairgrounds proved costly for several people who attended the State Fair on Sunday night, when their cars were towed from a shopping center lot across the street.The towing fee was $120.Baltimore County police said they received several calls from irate people about their cars being towed from the Timonium Shopping Center parking lot.One of them, Richard N. Smith of Cockeysville, said he had paid to park there -- giving an attendant $4 when he arrived about 9: 40 p.m. to take his 10-year-old godson for a brief visit to the fair's midway.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
Baltimore City Councilman Robert W. Curran is tired of hearing about motorists whose cars were towed for reasons he finds ridiculous - for being parked outside the white lines in a supermarket lot, for instance, or at a fast food restaurant when the business was closed. So he's sponsoring legislation to spell out a narrow list of conditions for which a vehicle can be removed from private property. And he would cut the allowed towing fee by nearly half. "What they're doing is such a disincentive for people to come here and visit Baltimore," Curran said.
NEWS
March 25, 2014
As a retired member of the law enforcement community, I am glad to see the article regarding tow trucks and the move-over law in The Sun ( "Proposed 'move-over' law would apply to tow trucks March 24). Most people have no idea whatsoever of the dangers involved in being a state trooper on any of the major highway systems in this nation. It is a fact that most of our troopers who are killed or severely injured were struck while handling various problems on the shoulder of one of those highways.
NEWS
March 24, 2014
Motorists on Maryland roads approaching a police or emergency vehicle stopped on the shoulder with lights flashing are required by law to move over to the next lane or slow down to avoid the possibility of hitting anyone standing nearby. It's a sensible measure designed to protect law-enforcement and emergency personnel from becoming victims of the very traffic problems they are attempting to solve. But if you happen to be a tow truck operator assisting a disabled vehicle under similar circumstances, well, that's another story: You can put up orange cones and flash your lights all you want but other drivers are under no obligation to slow down, let alone change lanes to avoid you. They can whip past at 65 mph inches from where you're standing, and it's all perfectly legal.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
After a tow truck operator from Green's Garage stopped on the shoulder of Interstate 795 in Reisterstown in January to help a motorist, she ended up needing a wrecker herself. A distracted driver veered off the road and hit her truck, causing nearly $10,000 in damage, according to Larry Green, owner of the Hampstead towing business and president of the Towing & Recovery Professionals of Maryland. The truck operator was not injured, Green said, but she and others face constant danger.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Yes, that really was actor Woody Harrelson tooling around Baltimore on a bike Friday afternoon. Master illusionist David Blaine was in tow, according to Joe Traill, the owner of Joe's Bike Shop in Fells Point. Traill said that Harrelson has been a customer of his ever since he came in Baltimore in 2011 to film "Game Change. " "I think a bike is his preferred mode of transport around the city," Traill said. But, he said, this was the first time Blaine had ever been inside the shop.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
The owner of a Brooklyn Park towing company was arrested Sunday in a string of thefts from vehicles his company had towed for the Anne Arundel County Police Department, police said. Matthew Schaefer, 36, of the 3000 block of McShane Way in Dundalk, was charged with theft and related offenses after search warrants turned up items believed to have been stolen, according to a news release from the department. The vehicles had been towed "for various reasons" and secured on the lot of his company, Schaefer Towing, in the 4700 block of Belle Grove Rd., the release said.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | March 21, 2009
Baltimore transportation officials towed a Secret Service van connected with former first daughter Jenna Bush's security detail yesterday, according to city and federal officials. Adrienne Barnes, a spokeswoman for the city's Department of Transportation, said that the van was towed from a South Baltimore neighborhood for a "nonmoving violation." The vehicle had accumulated six tickets, officials said, but the total fines and specific violations were not immediately available. A second Secret Service vehicle was also ticketed, Barnes said.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | December 29, 1990
As anyone who had to drive during this week's snowstorm knows, Maryland motorists do odd things when snow hits the road.But the automotive stunt that most puzzles transportation officials and tow operators is the decision to abandon vehicles just about anywhere, as hundreds of drivers did when 4 to 6 inches of snow began blanketing most of Maryland during evening rush hour Thursday."
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
A two-alarm fire burned through a Middle River towing company Wednesday morning and has closed a portion of Eastern Boulevard near Martin State Airport, according to Baltimore County fire officials. Firefighters were called to Phil Blythe's Towing in the 2800 block of Eastern Boulevard for reports of a fire about 8:15 a.m., and called for a second alarm to help fight the blaze. Firefighters from Baltimore County, Baltimore and the airport fought the fire from outside the building, which also has second-story apartments, said Lt. Jay Ringgold, a county fire spokesman.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | July 31, 2013
The fastest growing consumer complaints? In order:  Towing disputes, landlord/tenant problems, abusive debt collection practices, telephone billing issues and unlicensed contractors. That's according to an annual survey releaseed today by the Consumer Federation of America and the North American Consumer Protection Investigators. The CFA's Susan Grant says consumers are still suffering from recession-related problems such as foreclosure rescue scams, and landlords skimping on heat or ignoring repairs to save money.
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