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Tourist Season

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NEWS
September 19, 1997
THIS HAS BEEN a wonderful summer for most Inner Harbor businesses and attractions. Crowds have been strong, the weather has been splendid. Many visitors have returned home with good impressions of Baltimore. The question now is how to continue this momentum and extend the Inner Harbor tourist season, which now runs from mid-April to the end of October.A winter fest is one approach. "Baltimore's hottest winter," a promotional campaign centering on the annual week-long "Baltimore On Ice" extravaganza, has been successful the last few years.
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FEATURES
By LUAINE LEE and LUAINE LEE,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 5, 2006
LOS ANGELES-- --There's no doubt about it, novelist-journalist Carl Hiaasen writes about weirdoes. His books Strip Tease, Stormy Weather and Lucky You are packed with bizarre characters: a petty crook who fences hot wheelchairs, a 7-foot hit man, a guy who has a weed whacker surgically attached to his arm. "Growing up and working in Florida, the material is so rich," says Hiaasen, seated at a table in an empty hotel room here. "You can only put so much in the newspaper; in the meantime you have all this overflow, this great material, this great inspiration, and what better place to put it than in a novel?
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NEWS
March 1, 1997
AS BALTIMORE'S public works director, George S. Balog is a powerful man. He commands a big budget and an army of workers, who can favor friends or punish enemies. This fact is well understood: Mr. Balog derives much of his considerable power from being one of the most productive fund raisers for Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's political causes.Mr. Balog has now made a peculiar contribution to the commemoration of the 200th anniversary of Baltimore's incorporation. At the start of the tourist season, he has banished one of the two rival water taxi companies from using city landings at the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | November 29, 2005
Less than three days after a stubborn fire raced through three businesses in Annapolis' historic district, city officials set a May target for having much of the rebuilding done. "I know that's a little unrealistic," Annapolis Mayor Ellen O. Moyer said at a news conference yesterday held to discuss the five-alarm Friday night blaze. But the mayor said she wants to stick to an aggressive schedule that by the start of tourist season in May would see at least one refurbished building reopened, the second close behind and a third - on the site of a structure being demolished because it is unsalvageable - ready to rise from an approved design.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | November 29, 2005
Less than three days after a stubborn fire raced through three businesses in Annapolis' historic district, city officials set a May target for having much of the rebuilding done. "I know that's a little unrealistic," Annapolis Mayor Ellen O. Moyer said at a news conference yesterday held to discuss the five-alarm Friday night blaze. But the mayor said she wants to stick to an aggressive schedule that by the start of tourist season in May would see at least one refurbished building reopened, the second close behind and a third - on the site of a structure being demolished because it is unsalvageable - ready to rise from an approved design.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1998
A thousand pounds of pasta; 225 gallons of red sauce; 150 pounds of veal. Such is the gastronomic toll expected at just one of Little Italy's two dozen eateries this weekend, one of the busiest yet in a bustling tourist season."
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2002
The long-delayed visitors center planned for the west shore of the Inner Harbor is likely to miss most of another tourist season after a setback yesterday that will force the project to be rebid. The Board of Estimates rejected three bids because they did not properly document an intent to comply with minority participation requirements, said Andrew B. Frank, executive vice president of Baltimore Development Corp., the city's economic development agency. A fourth bid was rejected because it was over budget, Frank said.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2003
Travelers to Baltimore will have to wait until spring to experience Baltimore's new visitor center - the latest in a series of delays. Rain and snow have slowed the delivery of materials, and recent winds have blown off roofing trim that must now be remanufactured and replaced. The center's opening date was pushed recently from January to mid- to late March. "We're at the mercy of the weather," said Michael J. Pine, project manager for Roy Kirby & Sons Inc., the builder. "We're within an inch or two of the wettest year on record in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2003
After years of shifting locations, altered plans and false starts, Baltimore's new $4.5 million visitor center will finally open this year - but after the summer tourist season. The late opening, now scheduled for November, means that Baltimore's primary vehicle for telling tourists about the city's attractions and amenities will be operating for a fifth summer in a cramped, converted construction trailer that can accommodate just a handful of visitors at a time. Tourism officials concede that the long delay has likely cost the city business, and they are counting on the new Baltimore Visitor Center now rising along Light Street in the Inner Harbor to generate more tourism dollars for Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1997
From sales of $220-a-night hotel waterview suites to $1.50 peach ice cream cones, Baltimore's Inner Harbor experienced a banner warm-weather tourist season -- a May-to-October bonanza when lines formed before popular restaurants and day-trippers bought snow domes and plastic crabs marked "Baltimore" by the hundreds before boarding buses for home."
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2003
Travelers to Baltimore will have to wait until spring to experience Baltimore's new visitor center - the latest in a series of delays. Rain and snow have slowed the delivery of materials, and recent winds have blown off roofing trim that must now be remanufactured and replaced. The center's opening date was pushed recently from January to mid- to late March. "We're at the mercy of the weather," said Michael J. Pine, project manager for Roy Kirby & Sons Inc., the builder. "We're within an inch or two of the wettest year on record in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2003
After years of shifting locations, altered plans and false starts, Baltimore's new $4.5 million visitor center will finally open this year - but after the summer tourist season. The late opening, now scheduled for November, means that Baltimore's primary vehicle for telling tourists about the city's attractions and amenities will be operating for a fifth summer in a cramped, converted construction trailer that can accommodate just a handful of visitors at a time. Tourism officials concede that the long delay has likely cost the city business, and they are counting on the new Baltimore Visitor Center now rising along Light Street in the Inner Harbor to generate more tourism dollars for Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2002
The long-delayed visitors center planned for the west shore of the Inner Harbor is likely to miss most of another tourist season after a setback yesterday that will force the project to be rebid. The Board of Estimates rejected three bids because they did not properly document an intent to comply with minority participation requirements, said Andrew B. Frank, executive vice president of Baltimore Development Corp., the city's economic development agency. A fourth bid was rejected because it was over budget, Frank said.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2001
Mario Rinaldi is supervising the finishing touches to his $26 million Grand Hotel on the boardwalk in Ocean City - one of two large hotel projects new this season. Not far away, the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites will open 100 of its 132 luxury suites at 17th Street and the boardwalk May 17. The rest of the suites will open by July. Several hotels, including the Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel, the Carousel Beachfront Hotel & Suites and the Casablanca Oceanside Inn, have undergone major renovations.
NEWS
By Douglas Lamborne and Douglas Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 2000
MANY RESIDENTS run for cover this time of the year - The tourists are coming! The tourists are coming! - and steer clear of downtown Annapolis until after the boat shows in October. Well, there's good reason to venture downtown from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday for the 11th annual Annapolis Art Walk. Fifteen galleries will stay open beyond normal hours and will offer music, entertainment, refreshments and a variety of art. You'll find participating galleries under yellow helium balloons. "The walk is primarily for locals," said Cynthia McBride, owner of a gallery on Main Street and organizer of the walk.
NEWS
May 25, 1998
THE OPENING of attractions this summer at the Power Plant and Harborplace is dramatic evidence of the growing importance of tourism to Baltimore. The hospitality industry funnels an estimated $1 billion a year into the local economy and employs more than 16,000 people."
FEATURES
By LUAINE LEE and LUAINE LEE,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 5, 2006
LOS ANGELES-- --There's no doubt about it, novelist-journalist Carl Hiaasen writes about weirdoes. His books Strip Tease, Stormy Weather and Lucky You are packed with bizarre characters: a petty crook who fences hot wheelchairs, a 7-foot hit man, a guy who has a weed whacker surgically attached to his arm. "Growing up and working in Florida, the material is so rich," says Hiaasen, seated at a table in an empty hotel room here. "You can only put so much in the newspaper; in the meantime you have all this overflow, this great material, this great inspiration, and what better place to put it than in a novel?
NEWS
By Douglas Lamborne and Douglas Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 2000
MANY RESIDENTS run for cover this time of the year - The tourists are coming! The tourists are coming! - and steer clear of downtown Annapolis until after the boat shows in October. Well, there's good reason to venture downtown from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday for the 11th annual Annapolis Art Walk. Fifteen galleries will stay open beyond normal hours and will offer music, entertainment, refreshments and a variety of art. You'll find participating galleries under yellow helium balloons. "The walk is primarily for locals," said Cynthia McBride, owner of a gallery on Main Street and organizer of the walk.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1998
A thousand pounds of pasta; 225 gallons of red sauce; 150 pounds of veal. Such is the gastronomic toll expected at just one of Little Italy's two dozen eateries this weekend, one of the busiest yet in a bustling tourist season."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1997
From sales of $220-a-night hotel waterview suites to $1.50 peach ice cream cones, Baltimore's Inner Harbor experienced a banner warm-weather tourist season -- a May-to-October bonanza when lines formed before popular restaurants and day-trippers bought snow domes and plastic crabs marked "Baltimore" by the hundreds before boarding buses for home."
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