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By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | February 9, 1994
A Schaefer administration-backed bill that would channel a portion of sales tax increases to tourism promotion received a cool reception yesterday from state legislators who don't want their hands tied in future spending.As soon as the proposal hit the table, even supporters were backing away, saying they are open to other plans that would boost spending on tourism."It's a stupid way for government to go," said state Sen. Julian L. Lapides, D-Baltimore. "If you start dedicating funds, who is going to pay for the have-nots?"
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TRAVEL
By Megan Brockett, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
Tourism gains boosted Garrett County and the Deep Creek Lake area during the last fiscal year, the result of record accommodations sales for the county and a sharp increase in tourism sales tax revenue, according to the Garrett County Chamber of Commerce. Garrett County, roughly three hours from Baltimore by car, attracts visitors year-round with the state's largest freshwater lake, Deep Creek Lake, and its only ski resort. Tourism sales tax revenues for the county climbed more than 6 percent during the fiscal year that spanned July 2012 to June 2013, while tourism sales tax revenues for the state as a whole grew by less than 1 percent.  Nicole Christian, president and CEO of the Garrett County Chamber of Commerce, attributes much of the county's tourism growth to aggressive marketing strategies that span print, television, radio and online mediums, among others.
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NEWS
January 24, 1995
In the hours before he vacated the governor's office, William Donald Schaefer signed-off on so many tourism-related projects he probably got writer's cramp: $3 million for a cruise ship terminal at Baltimore's Inner Harbor, $2 million to rescue the Frostburg-Cumberland scenic train ride, and financing for a golf course and convention center at Rocky Gap State Park.There may be no sector of Maryland's economy so identified with the former governor as the $4.6 billion travel and tourism industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2013
Sure, Baltimore is crab country, but sometimes, you just want a lobster.  Gertrude's is running a Lobsterama special on Thursday nights in August. Diners can choose between a 1 1/4 pound New England lobster, simply steamed, for $24.95 or a Maryland-style lobster tail, stuffed with crab imperial for $29.95. Each option comes with a baked potato, coleslaw and Maryland sweet white corn on the cob. Gertrude's is recommending customers call in to reserve their lobsters. And Germano's in Little Italy is offering a lobster fra diavolo special for the entire month of August.
NEWS
By Philip Hosmer and Philip Hosmer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 5, 1995
A Harford County proposal to levy a 1 percent room tax to collect funds for tourism promotion is likely to be endorsed by the Harford County Hotel and Motel Association.But the association will agree to the controversial new tax only if a consultant's study clearly shows that increased tourism promotion will result in an increase in occupancy rates.The association also agreed to pay for half of the $25,000 cost of the consultant's study, with the county paying the remainder. The study will begin by the end of the month and take approximately 60 days to be completed, said Paul Gilbert, director of the county's office of economic development.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2001
House Speaker Casper R. Taylor urged lawmakers yesterday to override Gov. Parris N. Glendening's objections and pass legislation creating a more generously funded Cabinet-level Department of Tourism. The speaker led off a series of witnesses who decried the state's level of investment in promoting tourism, especially compared with neighboring states. "We're in the game, but we've got our hands tied behind us," Taylor said. He said that funding Maryland's tourism programs at current levels was "like telling the Baltimore Ravens defense to go out and win without [linebacker]
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | April 26, 1994
Maryland will have to constantly reinvent its image as it battles other states with heftier promotion budgets for its share of tourists' dollars, Gov. William Donald Schaefer said yesterday.Maryland has been losing a tug-of-war over tourism to rivals such as Virginia, Pennsylvania and even Alabama, which have run strong promotional campaigns to lure visitors, Governor Schaefer told about 300 people at the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association's annual tourism luncheon yesterday.
NEWS
July 30, 1992
As a tourist attraction, Baltimore County hardly ranks with southern California, central Florida or even downtown Baltimore. Still, the county government could be missing a golden opportunity by giving short shrift to the promotion of tourism.The tourism program launched in 1990 by then-County Executive Dennis F. Rasmussen, with its "Horses, Water and Wine" theme, fell victim to the recession. Mr. Rasmussen's successor, Roger B. Hayden, was faced with the necessity of slashing overall spending, so he closed the county's Office of Tourism and halved the $200,000 tourism budget.
NEWS
April 12, 1996
A SIGH OF RELIEF is in order following an 11th-hour decision by the General Assembly to devert $5 million in city highway user fees to bring more business to the Baltimore Convention Center. The decision, made just before the legislature adjourned, may delay some city pothole and resurfacing projects. But it looks like the best way to immediately provide more money to adequately market the center, which is failing to meet projections for future bookings.This one-time diversion of $5 million, though, does not take the pressure off Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to permanently improve funding for the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | June 1, 1993
The state's official tourism slogan is: "Maryland. More than you can imagine." Yet, when it comes to funding tourism promotions, the motto could be: "Much less than we need."Neighboring states of Virginia, Pennsylvania and West Virginia annually spend millions of dollars on television spots to lure tourists. Maryland restricts its ads to the printed page -- and often those ads must piggyback on the promotion of a business or government agency."Unfortunately, we may have the will, but not the means," said R. Dean Kenderdine, assistant secretary for the Department of Economic and Employment Development.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
Some Howard County state legislators are skeptical of an Ulman administration proposal to raise the local hotel/motel tax, presented as an idea to increase tourism and economic development, because the draft legislation presented at a public hearing doesn't say where the new revenue would go. Sen. James N. Robey, a Democrat, said he was concerned that the money wouldn't be set aside by law "I thought it would be in the bill. Why isn't that in the bill?" he asked David B. Nitkin, County Executive Ken Ulman's new lobbyist, at the hearing Monday night in the George Howard building in Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas And Ruma Kumar and Susan Gvozdas And Ruma Kumar,Sun Reporters | May 2, 2008
Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold unveiled a relatively lean $1.2 billion operating budget for fiscal 2009, angering school officials by only partially funding pay and benefits for system employees and riling a tourism promoter by calling for an increase in the county's hotel room tax. With tax revenues from real estate sales down more than $29 million from a year ago, Leopold proposed increasing total county spending for the coming year...
BUSINESS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2004
Walking into a room filled with an almost carnival-like set of popcorn, sodas and a TV screen about as tall as a pro basketball player, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. sported his typical dress shirt and tie - and a tool belt. Ehrlich is no handyman, he assured a crowd gathered for a news conference in Annapolis yesterday. He was there to promote Maryland's latest tourism video, called "Seize the Day Off." The $1.4 million campaign features the governor offering to relieve homeowners of their chores so they can go out and enjoy Maryland hot spots.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2004
Who better to judge a city than the people who decide where thousands of others will hold business and professional meetings for decades to come? So, it's with open ears that the sales team that pitches Baltimore is listening this week to the thoughts of nearly 1,000 association executives and meeting planners who are gathered here for a meeting of the American Society of Association Executives. The local sales force has been hearing a lot of positive feedback on Baltimore, accompanied by some thoughts on the city's limitations.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2003
The fate of Baltimore's ailing convention and tourism trade was entrusted last week to a woman with a scant history of promoting cities or landing conventions. She is a newcomer to Baltimore, a stranger to crab cakes and parking zones and sirens on Mondays. Yet, the selection of former U.S. Commerce Department official Leslie R. Doggett as the next president of the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association was almost universally hailed as a strong step forward for the battered agency.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2003
Leslie R. Doggett, a senior tourism official in the Clinton administration and an industry veteran, has been picked as the new chief of Baltimore's beleaguered convention bureau, city officials confirmed yesterday. The announcement of Doggett's appointment as president and chief executive officer of the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association is expected at a news conference this morning with Mayor Martin O'Malley and other senior city officials. The appointment ends a five-month search for what is seen as a critically important leadership role in the city's lagging effort to build convention and tourism business.
NEWS
April 6, 1996
BECAUSE THEY DON'T trust Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to take the right course, state legislative leaders are trying to solve Baltimore's tourism promotion problems for him. They are pushing a plan to place a cap on Baltimore's hotel room tax and specify how much of that revenue must be spent on tourism promotion and marketing of the expanded Convention Center.If the mayor allows the city's business to be dictated from Annapolis, he has only himself to blame for not showing the leadership needed to forge a deal among the city, Inner Harbor hotel operators and restaurant owners that would provide more money to promote the enlarged Baltimore Convention Center.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | October 19, 1993
OCEAN CITY -- Pumped up by the naming of a new state committee to champion tourism, Maryland officials are hoping they can throw off their Rodney Dangerfield complex and get some respect -- and an increase in funding."
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2001
House Speaker Casper R. Taylor urged lawmakers yesterday to override Gov. Parris N. Glendening's objections and pass legislation creating a more generously funded Cabinet-level Department of Tourism. The speaker led off a series of witnesses who decried the state's level of investment in promoting tourism, especially compared with neighboring states. "We're in the game, but we've got our hands tied behind us," Taylor said. He said that funding Maryland's tourism programs at current levels was "like telling the Baltimore Ravens defense to go out and win without [linebacker]
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1999
A group of community and business leaders has developed an ambitious plan to turn South Anne Arundel County into a vacation destination.The Annapolis, London Town and South County Heritage Area Steering Committee presented a proposal last week to use state and local money to promote and preserve area cultural heritage sites. The plan could bring in $70 million in tourist revenue and create 1,000 jobs after five years, the committee estimates."This is another way of planning the future of our county," said Ann M. Fligsten, a committee member.
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