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NEWS
By Robert R. Neall | November 2, 1990
ONE OF THE true benefits of a political campaign is the chance to meet so many different people in such a short period of time. During the year, I have taken full advantage of this opportunity and have learned a great deal from the people of this county.I have learned once again that people deserve a government as good as they are. All too often we expect so little of public officials that we are not disappointed when they deliver platitudes in lieu of honesty, promises instead of action, a sliver of truth, and answers calculated to please rather than inform.
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NEWS
By Jim Rosapepe | January 22, 2014
As Gov. Martin O'Malley makes his final state of the state speech Thursday, it's a good time to look at what seven years of his governorship have meant for Maryland. The state of the state is clearly good: first in median family income, a top three state in income mobility, first in K-12 education five years in a row. And Maryland has already recovered 99 percent of jobs lost in the Great Recession. These are hard facts. But such snapshots overstate and understate Mr. O'Malley's impact.
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BUSINESS
By Alyssa Gabbay and Alyssa Gabbay,Special to The Sun | April 14, 1991
Back in Biblical days, Noah turned to the craft of carpentry to keep his head above water during tough times.These days, Ilex Construction & Development Inc., is following the same course.In 1989, officials of the Baltimore-based company, which specializes in custom homebuilding, remodeling and restoration, looked to the future and saw a recession brewing. Diversification seemed to be the key to survival.They started a woodworking division in 1989 by acquiring the shops of two local cabinetmakers, Raymond Book and Joshua Brumfield.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
At one point during the three years that Harbor Bank of Maryland operated under heightened federal scrutiny, a regulator asked CEO Joseph Haskins Jr. why he stuck it out. Why not just retire? But for Haskins, one of the founders of the Baltimore bank in 1982, walking away was not an option. "I've grown up not running from a challenge, but facing it head on and looking to find a solution," said Haskins, 65. "And so, it isn't in my DNA to wilt under pressure. In fact, it only strengthens my resolve.
FEATURES
By San Francisco Chronicle | October 15, 1991
AMERICAN teen-agers are as deeply worried about the future as their parents and are willing to help their families through tough times -- even if that means working to help pay the household bills.Today's teen-agers are "determined caretakers of family futures" who know the realities of life and are eager to pitch in to help their families survive difficult economic times, according to a survey to be released today by the American Board of Family Practice."These kids aren't the same as teen-agers from [earlier generations]
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,Staff Writer | November 29, 1992
Gene Brown waited a long time to call the shots for the South Carroll football team.And he didn't mess up when the big moment came this season.Brown took over the Cavaliers after 16 years as an assistant at the school, and he guided the team through some tough times to finish with a 6-4 record."
NEWS
By Tommy Denton | July 19, 1995
TOUGH TIMES call for tough decisions, and Congress is busily about the business of making tough decisions on reducing the federal deficit.But wait. Let's define "tough times." The stock market is cruising along very nicely. President Clinton's deal with Japan that prevented a 100 percent tariff on luxury automobiles has kept sales of those sleek machines moving at a brisk pace. Tourism is thriving. Traffic is snarling around shopping malls from sea to shining sea. Fast-food franchises and other restaurants are packed with hungry customers.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 12, 1993
The State of the State . . .Mr. Speaker, Mr. President, Lieutenant Governor Steinman, I mean, Steinhorn, I mean, you know, the guy sittin' over there. . . . Honorable delegates, senators, honored judges, and everybody else . . .Here we are, the 1993 General Assembly.If they told me, a few months ago, I'd still be standing before you, I'd have have told them they were nuts.Tough times. Hard days. No money to do anything. Boring session coming up.You know, when we first came here, Annapolis, six years ago -- when I think back on that, that was a good time.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1999
Each time he takes a deep breath, Errict Rhett is reminded of his season's most unfortunate moment. It happened early in the second quarter against Tennessee two weeks ago. Just as Rhett hit the ground after being tackled after a 6-yard gain, Titans linebacker Joe Bowden delivered a helmet shot to Rhett's side. Rhett stayed on the ground for several minutes, then staggered off the field with severely bruised ribs. "It felt like somebody shot me in the back with a shotgun," said Rhett, who is still bothered by the injury.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | January 29, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- They were the Dallas Cowboys quarterback Odd Couple when they roomed together: the rag-armed journeyman who's quick with the quips and the strong-armed future star who talks only in cliches.The difference in their personalities didn't stop Babe Laufenberg and Troy Aikman from becoming good friends when they played together with the Dallas Cowboys in 1989-90."When I came here, he was a rookie having to play through some tough times," said Laufenberg, who made a career out of going through some tough times.
NEWS
March 26, 2013
Towson's President Maravene Loeschke is being heavily criticized for her cutting the men's baseball and soccer programs. The ensuing ire against her is not necessarily for cutting the sports but from the heavy handed handling of the cuts. Your recent article about the situation stated that Ms. Loeschke, while president of Mansfield University, was able to add programs in the face budget cuts, intimating that she was highly successful during her tenure ("Ire grows after Towson president cuts teams" Mar. 24)
NEWS
October 22, 2012
A report last week that the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is anticipating a deficit of $750,000 or more for the fiscal year that began in September is a reminder that the effects of the 2008 recession are still reverberating through the state's nonprofit arts community. The BSO, like arts groups across the state, was hit hard by the economic downturn, which triggered a drop in ticket sales, private and corporate contributions and state and local government grants. Despite having managed to balance its budget over the past several years by slashing staff, freezing hiring and cutting back in ways large and small, the orchestra still isn't out of the woods yet. Only two years ago, the BSO was forced to cut musicians' pay and benefits by 17 percent to balance the books, and that was after performers had already agreed to forgo raises totaling about $1 million in 2009.
NEWS
September 30, 2012
Some may be shocked by Steve Kilar's recent story highlighting the fact that one in four Baltimore residents live in poverty, and that many more struggle just above the outdated official poverty line ("Baltimore's poverty rate unchanged at 1 in 4 residents," Sept. 20). The 28 organizations that comprise the Maryland Alliance for the Poor see the impact of widespread poverty every day in their programs and clinics. The realities of poverty in Baltimore are stark: 11.1 percent of the labor force is officially unemployed, and even those who work full-time at the minimum wage have incomes below the poverty line.
NEWS
By Randy S. Robbins | January 9, 2012
During the summer of 1988, I was the guy who spray-painted house numbers on the curb. I'd spent June working the graveyard shift at UPS. After two summers of toiling for minimum wage - when minimum wage paid less than vagrancy - UPS offered a whopping $8 an hour. But it was back-breaking work, roughly the civilian equivalent of basic training. I single-handedly unloaded the cargo of 18-wheelers, much of it heavy and none of it quickly enough for the pacing floor manager, who barked like a drill sergeant.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2011
John David Kromkowski learned about compound interest as a youngster with the help of a passbook savings account at the bank. "Every time you went in, they would calculate the interest for you and put it in the book," the 49-year-old Baltimore County lawyer recalls. "It made me feel like, 'I'm making money here.'" Now, Kromkowski wants his son to learn about the miracle of compounding — earning interest on interest. The problem: Savings accounts pay so little interest now that compounding is negligible.
NEWS
September 4, 2011
In the latest battle between the states, officials in Virginia and Maryland are squaring off over whose budget-balancing prowess is greater. First, after Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell announced his state ended the year with $544 million in cash, $234 million more than expected, the Republican Party there crowed that Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley was, at the same time, predicting a $1 billion shortfall and floating the possibility of tax increases....
NEWS
By ANTERO PIETILA | April 4, 1992
These may be tough times in real estate. But for those with money, tough times offer unparalleled opportunities. Success, of course, is an entirely different matter.On this morning after the first Orioles game at the new ballpark some suckers with money to burn see dollar signs in everything within walking distance of Camden Station, the MARC commuter-train line and light rail.Yet sticky questions remain. After all the false starts in commercial redevelopment over the past decade, is a boom finally coming to the area or will this be another bubble that bursts?
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | January 6, 1991
It was a holiday season of mixed blessings for Maryland arts organizations.Just before Christmas, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra announced it would not undertake a 1992 European tour because it could not raise the necessary $500,000 in corporate underwriting.Bah, humbug!A week later, the Baltimore Opera Company announced that it had met a $1 million emergency fund-raising goal, thereby averting bankruptcy.Happy New Year!If there is a single meaning behind these seemingly conflicting messages, it would seem to be that, in these troubled economic times, those who support the arts are increasingly selective about how they do so."
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2011
Sam Cameron says high school classmates used to give her "funny looks" when she told them she planned to go to a local community college after graduation instead of some prestigious four-year institution. But the 19-year-old, now in her second year at Montgomery College, says she chose the Rockville school because it offered a strong honors program with small classes — and a full scholarship. "It's a very good school," says Cameron, who lives at home with her parents in Ashton.
EXPLORE
By Joan Spicknalldirector@suzukimusicschool.com | June 30, 2011
Can music education programs survive and prosper in today's economic climate? The answer is yes, if … There are many variables contributing to that conclusion, and when a certain number of them combine, a positive outcome is sure to result. To begin with, let's establish the premise that "every student in the nation should have an education in the arts. " This quote is the opening statement from "The Value and Quality of Arts Education: A Statement of Principles," which was collectively written and endorsed by the nation's 10 most important educational organizations, including the American Association of School Administrators, the National Education Association, the National Parent Teachers Association and the National School Boards Association.
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