Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTough On Crime
IN THE NEWS

Tough On Crime

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | February 23, 1994
Washington. -- Wouldn't it be nice to return to the days when families put a milk bottle on the porch with money in it, certain that only the milkman would take it? The problem is that when we put our money in the milk bottle, America didn't have millions of youngsters who were largely bereft of parental supervision.Children's ''churches'' were not street gangs. Their most trusted companion was not a revolver, and our streets didn't bristle with 211 million handguns.Americans now are vulnerable to a special hysteria about crime, because they don't know how to restore the tranquillity of a half-century ago, and they can't bring themselves to banish the pistols.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 20, 2012
So the people got sick of it, all those criminals being coddled by all those bleeding heart liberal judges with all their soft-headed concern for rights and rehabilitation. And a wave swept this country in the Reagan years, a wave ridden by pundits and politicians seeking power, a wave that said, no mercy, no more. From now on, judges would be severely limited in the sentences they could hand down for certain crimes, required to impose certain punishments whether or not they thought those punishments fit the circumstances at hand.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | October 18, 1994
Ellen R. Sauerbrey, Republican candidate for governor, returned yesterday to her alma mater, Western Maryland College, to talk tough on crime and argue that her proposed tax cut wouldn't slice essential services."
NEWS
August 18, 2008
Five murders in the first three months of the year was cause for alarm in Annapolis, prompting a cry for help from city leaders and assistance from state and federal officials. The killings followed a year in which the quaint, historic town had a record eight homicides, and in a city of 30,000, the effect on the public was akin to a tsunami. But after a renewed focus on troublesome areas, more street patrols and a reliance on crime-mapping, the crime wave has slowed to a ripple. Citizens spoke out and government responded - that's the measure of a city in sync with itself.
NEWS
August 18, 2008
Five murders in the first three months of the year was cause for alarm in Annapolis, prompting a cry for help from city leaders and assistance from state and federal officials. The killings followed a year in which the quaint, historic town had a record eight homicides, and in a city of 30,000, the effect on the public was akin to a tsunami. But after a renewed focus on troublesome areas, more street patrols and a reliance on crime-mapping, the crime wave has slowed to a ripple. Citizens spoke out and government responded - that's the measure of a city in sync with itself.
NEWS
By Stan Sinberg | May 16, 1996
MILL VALLEY, Calif. -- Between now and Election Day, politicians will fall over themselves in trying to convince us they are tougher on crime than their opponents.Of course, no matter who gets elected, it won't have a radical impact on the crime rate. This is good news because -- well, frankly, we need crime.Imagine for a moment that tomorrow noon, all crime disappears. No more burglaries, robberies, larcenies. Within days, entire industries would go belly-up: police departments, detective agencies, security guards, gun manufacturers, locksmiths, self-defense teachers, sociologists, alarm makers, etc.Why, the construction business alone would go into a major tailspin if it wasn't engaged in building prisons.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | March 13, 1995
Washington. -- This country has become so violent that these sentences sum up myriad tragic vignettes of our time:''The supervisor kept promoting other people over me, so I just went to the office and shot the S-O-B.''''My boyfriend said he wanted me but not with my children, so I drowned my kids.''''I asked him to give me his sneakers and he got huffy, so I showed him who was toughest. I shot him.''''My parents abused me, so when I couldn't take it any more I took a shotgun and killed them while they were watching TV.''''These cops were hounding me, trying to railroad me to prison, so I just walked into the police station and mowed some of 'em down.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | October 8, 1998
WITH THE gubernatorial campaign in full swing and negative commercials filling the airwaves, can these attack ads be far behind?Sauerbrey No. 1Ellen Sauerbrey can run from her environmental record. But she can't hide.She voted against the Clean Air Act, against the ban on phosphates. Now she's outdone herself.Guess where she's building her new summer home on the bay?Right. Smack in the prime nesting area for the great blue heron.And when a local conservation group pointed out a mound of brush containing six of the wading birds' eggs, Ms. Sauerbrey responded: "Tough.
NEWS
September 24, 1990
Middle class again will carry the loadThe conflict between Democrates and Republicans over proposed increases in Medicare premiums is a budget sticking point which makes clear that Congress considers the poor, the rich and the elderly to be sacred cows who do not have to share in the burden of reducing the deficit.Who does that leave? Those of us in the middle who work to support ourselves and our children in this recession. We pay tremendous taxes to provide Social Security for the elderly and the poor while getting neither the tax benefits set aside for the rich nor the security provided for the poor.
NEWS
By Norris West | October 20, 1996
IT'S TIME FOR Howard County to take a good look in the mirror and see whether its pretty face is only a makeover or an ugly reality.A mirror might reveal blemishes when it reflects on the county's response to the appointment of two Circuit Court judges and on the ensuing campaign challenging the appointees.Howard County advertises itself as a fair-minded community that believes hard work and playing by the rules are keys to success.It's a wonder nobody's sued for false advertising yet.The judges' race uncovers the naked truth: Many countians believe in rules only when those rules produce the results they want.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN REPORTER | June 6, 2008
To Mozetta Smith, the mug shot on the orange flier that police handed out looked familiar. Still, after scouring her memory, Smith could not quite remember where she had seen convicted felon Collin Hawkins - but for sure, she was pleased he was off the street. Hawkins, 26, is a drug dealer and carjacker who was acquitted last month in the attempted murder of an off-duty city police officer. But Hawkins was also sentenced recently to 30 years in federal prison for a handgun violation - a conviction local and federal authorities held up as a success story in a two-year-old partnership.
NEWS
February 20, 2002
MY YOUNGEST was about to turn only a year old, but I had no choice. I needed to return to work. I sent out resumes. Financially, things became desperate, so I decided I would take any job that would give me benefits. Then the call came. "We would like you to come in for an interview at School 370 - Baltimore Detention Center." "Do you mean the jail?" I asked in disbelief. "Yes." Since I live in Baltimore City, I had voted "tough on crime" so that I didn't have to fear the population in prison.
NEWS
May 13, 2000
`Front end' solutions can help stop crime As we grapple with the issues surrounding the Baltimore police department and commissioner, we need also to consider that studies have linked poverty and low levels of education with crime. Surveys indicate that, upon their entrance to prison, most inmates had less than an eighth grade education and lived in an impoverished environment. Poverty and lack of education are not excuses for crime, because many poor and "undereducated" people do not commit crimes.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 13, 1999
BOSTON -- Presidential candidate Al Gore threw himself headlong into the raging gun-control debate yesterday, proposing a nationwide licensing system that would require safety checks and photo IDs for all gun-buyers.The vice president's plan would essentially make gun-buyers subject to the same sort of licensing requirements now imposed on drivers. States would have broad discretion in implementing the program, but aides said federal funding might be tied to meeting certain national standards.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1999
Announcing his bid to become Baltimore's next mayor, City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III said yesterday he would implement the "zero tolerance" crime-fighting strategy that has helped other cities across America drastically reduce their murder rates. Over the past 10 years, Baltimore has recorded more than 300 murders a year, making it one of the most consistently violent cities in the nation. Surrounded by fellow council members and the leaders of the city's police and fire unions in the City Hall rotunda, Bell said he would reverse the murder trend if elected mayor.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | October 8, 1998
WITH THE gubernatorial campaign in full swing and negative commercials filling the airwaves, can these attack ads be far behind?Sauerbrey No. 1Ellen Sauerbrey can run from her environmental record. But she can't hide.She voted against the Clean Air Act, against the ban on phosphates. Now she's outdone herself.Guess where she's building her new summer home on the bay?Right. Smack in the prime nesting area for the great blue heron.And when a local conservation group pointed out a mound of brush containing six of the wading birds' eggs, Ms. Sauerbrey responded: "Tough.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | April 4, 1993
Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden announced a program yesterday to help communities fight crime: grants of up to $2,000 for things such as block-watch signs and walkie-talkies for community patrols."
NEWS
February 4, 1997
EVERY CANDIDATE for prosecutor pledges to be tough on crime. Marna McLendon was no exception when she lost in her first race against then-incumbent Howard County State's Attorney William Hymes 10 years ago.Having captured the state's attorney's office three years ago, however, the high number of District Court cases her office chooses not to prosecute creates the perception that she is a cream puff on crime. But that is not necessarily so.Howard fails to prosecute 56 percent of District Court cases, far higher than the 39 percent regional average.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1996
The challengers in the heated Howard County judicial race tried to reinforce their tough-on-crime campaign theme yesterday with a new cable TV ad that rebuts their electoral opponents' depiction of them as hypocrites on the crime issue.The 30-second spot cites endorsements of the challengers -- District Court Judge Lenore R. Gelfman and attorney Jonathan Scott Smith -- by former county police chiefs Paul H. Rappaport and Robert O. Mathews and former county State's Attorney William R. Hymes.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.