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NEWS
August 13, 2014
Soft love doesn't belong in education, but it is often a motivator in allowing our youth to proceed in the system without achieving the required knowledge. Yes, love may be a motivator in allowing a student to "do a project" instead of qualifying, although such compromises also cover up the failure of the system to have the student qualify. "Do a project instead of qualifying" is one of many examples of demand compromise which have spared some young people the hurt of a current failure while dooming them to future pain of inability to cope as adults.
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NEWS
August 13, 2014
Soft love doesn't belong in education, but it is often a motivator in allowing our youth to proceed in the system without achieving the required knowledge. Yes, love may be a motivator in allowing a student to "do a project" instead of qualifying, although such compromises also cover up the failure of the system to have the student qualify. "Do a project instead of qualifying" is one of many examples of demand compromise which have spared some young people the hurt of a current failure while dooming them to future pain of inability to cope as adults.
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NEWS
March 17, 1995
Republican members of Congress have described their welfare reform proposals as a "tough love" remedy for the excesses of government compassion. What they don't point out as readily is that some of its provisions represent tough luck for state economies as well.There are many things wrong with the current welfare system. But welfare's status as an "entitlement" for those who qualify is not the problem. It is how these entitlements are calculated and NTC implemented. Entitlement is what makes welfare a safety net, not just for poor families, but also for the states and communities in which they live and spend their benefits.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
Rita R. Martin, a counselor of homeless women at a Better Waverly residence, died of complications from multiple myeloma and infection Monday at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Lochearn resident was 69. Born Rita Reynolds in San Diego, she earned a bachelor's degree in sociology and French at Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Mo. While a senior, she met her future husband, Larry L. Martin, a college professor. "I was on a one-year assignment to the school, and we were introduced through a family there," said Dr. Martin.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | August 15, 2008
A few sentences on page 46 of a financial disclosure that did not change reported profits, sales or net worth caused Constellation Energy Group's prospects to go into brownout this week. Its shares dropped 16 percent Tuesday. Analysts rushed to downgrade the stock, although one contrarian changed his recommendation from "underperform" to "hold" because the shares had fallen so far. Standard & Poor's downgraded Constellation bonds to two steps above "junk" status. A little jumpy, aren't we?
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | June 4, 1995
As a young social worker seeking an advanced degree, Barbara A. Mikulski was told by her supervisor that she didn't have ''a therapeutic personality.''Now, many years and much success later, the only social worker in the United States Senate is taking on the task of persuading her fellow Democrats that her brand of ''tough love'' is more effective than the party's traditional ''therapeutic'' approach to social problems. She's betting that it will be more popular with voters as well.Nowhere is the difference between the two approaches more definitive than in welfare reform, and in the coming weeks, Senator Mikulski and some of her colleagues hope to make a mark on welfare legislation in the Senate.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1998
John Chaney recruited Aaron McKie from one of Philadelphia's most impoverished neighborhoods, just a short walk from Temple University's inner-city campus.He recruited Huey Futch from Naranja, Fla. -- just outside Homestead -- and the ravages of Hurricane Andrew.And once, as legend has it, he recruited a 7-footer named Eddie Geiger out of a car wash. That was back in the late 1970s, before Temple, when Chaney still coached at what is now Cheyney (Pa.) University.When Chaney brings his 24th-ranked Owls to the Baltimore Arena for a nonconference game against Maryland tomorrow, you can glimpse all their distinctive trademarks.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 13, 1992
Whether with the nation's money or their own, members of Congress are as addicted to unbacked checks as other people are to crack. Only tough love will help them.The Brits can hold a whole election in 28 days. What do they know that we don't?Let's go back to New Hampshire and start over.City police HQ is moving to Howard and Lexington if only to provide security for folks waiting for the light rail.
NEWS
By KAREN KARBO and KAREN KARBO,NEWSDAY | February 19, 2006
Help at Any Cost: How the Troubled-Teen Industry Cons Parents and Hurts Kids Maia Szalavitz Riverhead / 326 pages / $25.95 Maia Szalavitz's brisk investigation of America's so-called "tough love" treatment programs, which bill themselves as the last hope for out-of-control, drug-taking teens, would be the stuff of a bad TV movie if it weren't so smart, well-researched and evenhanded. The title alone evokes alarm: Help at Any Cost: How the Troubled-Teen Industry Cons Parents and Hurts Kids.
NEWS
February 17, 1995
Parking BluesIf the "Homicide" television series is supposed to generate money for Baltimore, then let the film crews pay the city for parking or leave their vehicles elsewhere.Many employers, employees and residents of Fells Point are fed up with the lack of parking and inconvenience the filming of "Homicide" has caused.Karl SteinBaltimoreNuclear AsiaWhile Jonathan Power (Opinion * Commentary column, Jan. 27) is correct in describing South Asia as an "active nuclear flash point," he has, regrettably, got some of his facts wrong and, worse, puts forward an argument that is inconsistent.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Frances M. Finney, who overcame poverty, earned a college degree and became a city school teacher, died April 19 from heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Guilford resident was 82. Frances Mae Hopkins was born in Baltimore and was raised in her maternal grandmother's Etting Street rowhouse. "Like many African-American families in the 1930s and 1940s, she grew up poor and remembered being taunted by others because of the neighborhood where she lived," said a daughter, Joyce E. Stewart, who is director of implementation and compliance for the Housing Authority of Baltimore City.
NEWS
May 19, 2013
Coppin State University is a mess, and the problems go well beyond its abysmal six-year graduation rate of 15 percent. A report to the University System of Maryland Board of Regents by a committee assigned to study the school in the wake of former President Reginald Avery's departure found massive mismanagement, inefficiency and indifference. The state puts more resources per student into Coppin than any other institution in the university system, and it gets the least return. That's bad for the taxpayers, but it's worse for the students whose dreams of advancement go unfulfilled.
NEWS
By Ted Wachtel | June 14, 2011
At City Springs Elementary and Middle School in Baltimore, where 99 percent of students are from families with incomes below the poverty line, there were 86 student suspensions in 2008-09. In 2009-10, there were only 10 suspensions. Twenty students at City Springs were suspended for fighting in 2008-09 and 16 more for insubordination. A year later, only two were suspended for fighting and none for insubordination. In that same year, the number of City Springs students functioning at grade level tripled.
NEWS
September 27, 2010
Like a good teacher refusing to grade on a curve, the U.S. Environment Protection Agency handed out some failing grades last week to Chesapeake Bay states whose cleanup plans are woefully inadequate. Hallelujah. If the EPA's heightened involvement in the Chesapeake Bay is going to turn the tide on water quality, the agency can't be seen backing down now. The low scores given to Virginia, Pennsylvania, New York and West Virginia should send a message that the environmental excuses of the past are the equivalent of dogs eating homework.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2010
Dr. Nathan Schnaper, an eminent psychiatrist who was known for his work with patients and their families at the Greenebaum Cancer Center, died Monday in his sleep at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime Sudbrook Park resident was 92. "He had been rapidly failing over the last several weeks," said his son-in-law, Dr. James M. Carlton, a Baltimore hand surgeon. "On Monday, he had eaten a lunch of a corned beef sandwich, potato chips, an Entemann's chocolate doughnut and some Gatorade," Dr. Carlton said.
NEWS
October 30, 2008
The Maryland State Board of Education sent a clear message yesterday to the approximately 9,000 high school seniors who haven't yet passed the standardized tests in algebra, English, American government and biology that are now mandatory for graduation: This train is leaving the station, so get on board if you want a diploma in June. That may be tough love, but seniors who get their act together and meet the requirement probably will look back one day and be glad educators made them toe the line.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | October 6, 1994
Washington. -- An argument can be made that the United States has become ungovernable. Certainly it is not being governed by its president. Real power has leaked out of the Clinton administration. Is this Mr. Clinton's fault, or is he the victim of impersonal forces?His efforts to get his domestic agenda enacted have systematically been blocked by the Republican minority, in provisional alliances with Clinton opponents within the Democratic Party. Even his crime bill barely passed.Foreign policy has slipped out of his control.
NEWS
By MILTON KENT | February 13, 2007
Five minutes after a game is over, the words come tumbling from Towson Catholic senior Candice Walker in a relentless stream, and her hands are moving about as quickly to make one point after another. The funny thing is, not 10 minutes before, Walker, the Owls' point guard, was the essence of calm and cool, slowing the tempo and controlling the situation. "I just know how to settle down and to settle everybody down," said Walker, after Saturday's win over National Christian Academy of Fort Washington.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,jamison.hensley@baltsun.com | September 21, 2008
In his first meeting of training camp, new Ravens coach John Harbaugh and the rest of his staff wore T-shirts with the famous black-and-white still frame of Muhammad Ali standing over a fallen Sonny Liston. On the back, there's a quote from Ali: "The fight is won or lost far away from witnesses - behind the lines, in the gym, and out there on the road, long before I dance under those lights." The message was intended to reinforce Harbaugh's mantra of hard work and discipline. But this truly represents the first great accomplishment of the rookie head coach - keeping his team focused behind the scenes when the season could have easily fallen apart before it began.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | August 15, 2008
A few sentences on page 46 of a financial disclosure that did not change reported profits, sales or net worth caused Constellation Energy Group's prospects to go into brownout this week. Its shares dropped 16 percent Tuesday. Analysts rushed to downgrade the stock, although one contrarian changed his recommendation from "underperform" to "hold" because the shares had fallen so far. Standard & Poor's downgraded Constellation bonds to two steps above "junk" status. A little jumpy, aren't we?
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