Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTotem
IN THE NEWS

Totem

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 7, 1997
Playwright James Sherman seems to have found a gold mine in the Goldmans -- the fictitious family he created in his off-Broadway hit comedy, "Beau Jest," and has now returned to in the sequel, "Jest a Second!""Beau Jest" was one of last season's hits at Totem Pole Playhouse, so now the theater has brought the Goldmans back -- using the identical cast and director, Baltimorean Wil Love.As it turns out, Sherman didn't merely revisit the same family for his new play, he basically revisited the same plot.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | April 8, 2011
Just wanted to pass along a heads up about two great deals spotted on Baltimoreonthecheap.com : 1. Save 40 percent off Cirque du Soleil TOTEM tickets , via Travel Zoo, for shows tonight and next week; 2. Sign up for eight Argentine tango lessons at Centerstage and pay only half price --- just $10 per class.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | August 26, 1994
Dave Freeman's "A Bedfull of Foreigners" is a farce about travelers for whom everything goes wrong. But just about everything goes right in Totem Pole Playhouse's production.Set in a run-down French hotel near the German border on the eve of an arcane local festival, the action focuses on five hotel guests. Stanley and Brenda are a husband and wife on a vacation plagued by disasters. Claude is a businessman who is planning to spend a night with his mistress when his wife shows up unexpectedly.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2007
As diplomats and world leaders gather at the U.S. Naval Academy today in hopes of laying the groundwork for a new Middle East peace agreement, they will be surrounded by reminders of the terrible cost of war. Memorial Hall, where President Bush will kick off the conference this morning and the bulk of the official events will be held, is filled with tablets that carry the names of 2,623 fallen graduates, killed in conflicts dating to the Civil War. ...
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 28, 2005
Beginning Tuesday, audiences at Totem Pole Playhouse will see a very different Carl Schurr. For the past two decades, almost every show at the summer playhouse in Pennsylvania's Caledonia State Park has begun with a precurtain speech delivered by Schurr, the Baltimore-based actor/director who has run Totem Pole since 1984. This month, he even bought a new white suit in which to perform his duties as official greeter. "It's tradition at the Pole that Carl gets in his glad rags and comes down the aisle and says hello," explains Schurr, whose full title is producing artistic director.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 6, 1996
When a character in a farce proclaims: "Absolutely nothing can go wrong," you can be dead certain there's trouble ahead.But just about everything goes right in Totem Pole Playhouse's production of "Lend Me a Tenor," the Ken Ludwig farce in which those fated words are spoken by the producer of the fictitious Cleveland Grand Opera Company.The things that go right begin with Baltimore actor Wil Love's portrayal of the producer, whose name is Saunders and who is having a Murphy's Law kind of day.The time is September 1934, and Saunders has engaged a world-famous Italian tenor, Tito Merelli, to make his American debut that night in Verdi's "Otello."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 8, 1998
There are few more delightful ways to wile away a summer day than with a juicy murder mystery. If that mystery is also witty and sophisticated, all the better."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 6, 2004
The Magrath sisters are having a bad day - "a real bad day," as youngest sister Babe would put it. But a bad day for the three siblings at the center of Crimes of the Heart is a good day for theatergoers at Totem Pole Playhouse in Fayetteville, Pa., where Beth Henley's 1981 Pulitzer Prize-winning play is receiving a luminous production. Bad days are nothing new to the three Magrath girls. Their mother had one years ago and hanged herself - along with the family cat. Now it's the 30th birthday of the eldest sister, Lenny; her prized horse has been killed by lightning, and Babe is about to be released on bail after shooting her abusive husband in the stomach.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 9, 1999
Located just outside Gettysburg, Totem Pole Playhouse may be deep in Civil War territory, but the theater is paying a charming tribute to another chapter of American history with "The Pursuit of Happiness."A comedy with a Revolutionary War-era setting, "The Pursuit of Happiness" was written in 1933 by Lawrence Langner and Armina Marshall Langner, made into a movie a year later and a Broadway musical ("Arms and the Girl") in 1950. Although the play is rarely produced these days, it has become something of a favorite at Pennsylvania's Totem Pole, where it is undergoing its third thoroughly enjoyable revival under the direction of the theater's Baltimore-based producing artistic director, Carl Schurr.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amanda Smear and Amanda Smear,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2003
With Oil City Symphony, Totem Pole Playhouse in Fayetteville, Pa., in association with Caledonia Theatre Company, offers audiences an eclectic mix of music, a comedic story and a chance to meet and mingle with cast members. The show, set in the gymnasium of the old Oil City High School, features the instrumental and vocal talent of four former "band nerds" celebrating their 20th high school reunion. They have come back to pay tribute to their former music teacher, who is actually played by a different lucky audience member each night.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2007
Piano and the BSO The lowdown -- When it comes to musical prodigies, Kit Armstrong is in the front ranks. The 15-year-old California-born pianist and composer returns to the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, this time to collaborate with guest conductor and inimitable vocalist Bobby McFerrin. Armstrong, who is already in the second year of undergraduate studies (music and science) at two colleges in London, will play Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 20. The program also offers Mendelssohn's Italian Symphony and, of course, vocal improv by McFerrin.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 6, 2006
FAYETTEVILLE, Pa. -- "A man and his dog -- it's a big thing," a character cautions in A.R. Gurney's Sylvia. The title character of this 1995 play is, in fact, a dog. But as Carl Schurr's production at Totem Pole Playhouse makes unmistakably clear, Sylvia is about more than just a man and a dog. It's about midlife crises, jealousy, the empty-nest syndrome and marital discord; there's even a touch of feminism. The plot is relatively simple. A middle-aged New York currency trader named Greg finds an abandoned dog -- with "Sylvia" on her collar -- in Central Park and brings her home.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2005
With hundreds of doctors and nurses staffing health centers for Hurricane Katrina victims just south of New Orleans, Maryland has become "a guardian angel," Jefferson Parish President Aaron Broussard said yesterday. Broussard has been an outspoken critic of federal relief efforts - he suggested on NBC's Meet the Press last week that "whoever is at the top of this totem pole, that totem pole needs to be chain-sawed off" - but he had considerably nicer things to say about Maryland's contribution to his parish's recovery.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2005
BATON ROUGE, La. -- Even as federal aid and troops are pouring into New Orleans to assist victims of Hurricane Katrina, the hard-to-reach rural communities around the city have received little -- if any -- assistance from federal agencies, and they are straining to provide for their residents and clean up. "The federal people don't have a clue," said U.S. Rep. Charlie Melancon, a Democrat who represents southeastern Louisiana. "They know where New Orleans is, period." Federal officials continued to confront an onslaught of criticism that their initial response to Hurricane Katrina was sluggish and often incoherent.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2005
NOW OR NEVER It is never too late to find love. That is the premise of Richard Baer's Mixed Emotions, the play that wraps up the 2005 season at Totem Pole Playhouse, the summer theater in Pennsylvania's Caledonia State Park. The romantic comedy stars Totem Pole veterans Patti Perkins and Wil Love as a pair of 60-something friends, a widow and widower. Love, a Baltimorean, has appeared in 137 Totem Pole productions over the past 35 years. Mixed Emotions, which was presented on Broadway in 1993, is directed by another Baltimorean, Carl Schurr, the theater's producing artistic director.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 28, 2005
Beginning Tuesday, audiences at Totem Pole Playhouse will see a very different Carl Schurr. For the past two decades, almost every show at the summer playhouse in Pennsylvania's Caledonia State Park has begun with a precurtain speech delivered by Schurr, the Baltimore-based actor/director who has run Totem Pole since 1984. This month, he even bought a new white suit in which to perform his duties as official greeter. "It's tradition at the Pole that Carl gets in his glad rags and comes down the aisle and says hello," explains Schurr, whose full title is producing artistic director.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 5, 2000
Depending on the intelligence of the quarry, a hunter might hesitate to set the same trap in the same place twice. Yet that's what playwright Ira Levin does in his thriller, "Deathtrap." The 1979 play is Broadway's longest-running thriller (more than four years), which is mysterious in itself. Levin pulls identical surprises on his audience in both acts, and while the initial trick gives you a jolt, it's considerably less spine-tingling the second time around, no matter how slick the production.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 6, 2006
FAYETTEVILLE, Pa. -- "A man and his dog -- it's a big thing," a character cautions in A.R. Gurney's Sylvia. The title character of this 1995 play is, in fact, a dog. But as Carl Schurr's production at Totem Pole Playhouse makes unmistakably clear, Sylvia is about more than just a man and a dog. It's about midlife crises, jealousy, the empty-nest syndrome and marital discord; there's even a touch of feminism. The plot is relatively simple. A middle-aged New York currency trader named Greg finds an abandoned dog -- with "Sylvia" on her collar -- in Central Park and brings her home.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.