Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTote Board
IN THE NEWS

Tote Board

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
April 21, 2002
The Maryland Racing Commission has added one line to the agenda of its monthly meeting Wednesday at Pimlico. That line is "tote board." And that may result in another heated exchange at a racing commission meeting. Such exchanges have become the norm as Maryland racing continues to grasp futilely for unity and common strategies. This time, the controversy swirls around the Maryland Jockey Club's decision to shut down the tote board at Pimlico and replace it with a 26-by-32-foot video screen.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2002
When patrons return to Pimlico in September for the fall meet that features the Maryland Million, they will be greeted by a new tote board in the infield, track officials said yesterday. Management ordered the old tote board boarded up and a 26-by-32-foot video screen erected for the spring meet at Pimlico. After receiving so many complaints, the track plans on building a new tote board over the summer. "We're trying to react to what the fans are asking for," said Lou Raffetto Jr., chief operating officer of the Maryland Jockey Club.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2002
When patrons return to Pimlico in September for the fall meet that features the Maryland Million, they will be greeted by a new tote board in the infield, track officials said yesterday. Management ordered the old tote board boarded up and a 26-by-32-foot video screen erected for the spring meet at Pimlico. After receiving so many complaints, the track plans on building a new tote board over the summer. "We're trying to react to what the fans are asking for," said Lou Raffetto Jr., chief operating officer of the Maryland Jockey Club.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2002
Regulars know that the new JumboTron board is no suitable replacement for the old totalizator board in the infield, and yesterday the Preakness crowd came to realize it. "I understood the other board better," Carol Barney said. "The old one made a little more sense. You could tell the exactas and trifectas. I just can't understand some of the stuff on this one." Deactivated to make room for $250 canopied seats facing the track's rail, the old tote board provided much more information more often and was easier to see in both the sunshine and the shadows.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2002
Regulars know that the new JumboTron board is no suitable replacement for the old totalizator board in the infield, and yesterday the Preakness crowd came to realize it. "I understood the other board better," Carol Barney said. "The old one made a little more sense. You could tell the exactas and trifectas. I just can't understand some of the stuff on this one." Deactivated to make room for $250 canopied seats facing the track's rail, the old tote board provided much more information more often and was easier to see in both the sunshine and the shadows.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2002
Pimlico Race Course has never been known for its high-end luxury seating, but this year a temporary section of $250 seats across the track from the grandstand was added. The seats, known as the Turfside Terrace, are the costliest at the track and come with a buffet picnic lunch, parking and separate betting and restrooms. "I think they are going to be the best seats in the house. You can just about reach out and touch the horses," said Karin De Francis, vice president of public relations and marketing for Pimlico.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 16, 1991
LAUREL -- An incident at Laurel Race Course yesterday has led to a revision of the Maryland policy concerning stewards' inquiries. Departing from tradition, numbers of horses involved in inquiries will be blinked on the tote board during the time of review, chief steward Clinton P. Pitts Jr. said.The incident that brought the change involved Gallant Stinger, a heavy favorite in the third race. The filly was disqualified from first to 12th for bearing out soon after the start and impeding two rivals.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2002
Lou Raffetto Jr., chief operating officer of the Maryland Jockey Club, asked the Maryland Racing Commission yesterday for forbearance, which it granted. As a result, the tote system in Pimlico's infield will remain a work in progress that, apparently, no one's happy with. "We have not been satisfied from the get-go," Raffetto told the commissioners at their monthly meeting at Pimlico. Patrons haven't been satisfied either. When Pimlico opened April 3, they discovered that the infield tote board had been shuttered and a 26-by-32-foot video screen had risen next to it. Bettors complained that the screen, known as LumatronX, did not display adequate betting information and was difficult to see. "We've had lots of complaints from patrons about not being able to see clearly the odds on the screen," said Lou Ulman, chairman of the racing commission.
SPORTS
May 20, 2000
Every game has its own lingo, which newcomers tend to find baffling, and racing is no exception. Here's a sampler. ACROSS THE BOARD: This is a bet on one horse to win, place and show. It gets this name because if your horse finishes first, you get all three payoffs shown on the infield tote board -- the win, place and show prices. If the horse runs second, you get both the place and show prices, and if it runs third, you get only the show price. A standard across the board bet costs $6. BLINKERS: Blinkers are headgear worn by horses who have a tendency to be easily distracted.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | May 5, 1996
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- D. Wayne Lukas threw his arms around Bill Young, the 78-year-old owner of Grindstone, when the horses crossed the finish line."We did it!" Lukas shouted, tears filling his eyes at the prospect of having trained a Kentucky Derby winner for Young, a lifelong Kentuckian and one of racing's last real sportsmen.Then, in a heartbeat, exultation turned into apprehension in Young's box in the grandstand. Another horse, Cavonnier, had crossed the finish line even with Grindstone.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2002
Pimlico Race Course has never been known for its high-end luxury seating, but this year a temporary section of $250 seats across the track from the grandstand was added. The seats, known as the Turfside Terrace, are the costliest at the track and come with a buffet picnic lunch, parking and separate betting and restrooms. "I think they are going to be the best seats in the house. You can just about reach out and touch the horses," said Karin De Francis, vice president of public relations and marketing for Pimlico.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2002
Lou Raffetto Jr., chief operating officer of the Maryland Jockey Club, asked the Maryland Racing Commission yesterday for forbearance, which it granted. As a result, the tote system in Pimlico's infield will remain a work in progress that, apparently, no one's happy with. "We have not been satisfied from the get-go," Raffetto told the commissioners at their monthly meeting at Pimlico. Patrons haven't been satisfied either. When Pimlico opened April 3, they discovered that the infield tote board had been shuttered and a 26-by-32-foot video screen had risen next to it. Bettors complained that the screen, known as LumatronX, did not display adequate betting information and was difficult to see. "We've had lots of complaints from patrons about not being able to see clearly the odds on the screen," said Lou Ulman, chairman of the racing commission.
SPORTS
April 21, 2002
The Maryland Racing Commission has added one line to the agenda of its monthly meeting Wednesday at Pimlico. That line is "tote board." And that may result in another heated exchange at a racing commission meeting. Such exchanges have become the norm as Maryland racing continues to grasp futilely for unity and common strategies. This time, the controversy swirls around the Maryland Jockey Club's decision to shut down the tote board at Pimlico and replace it with a 26-by-32-foot video screen.
SPORTS
May 20, 2000
Every game has its own lingo, which newcomers tend to find baffling, and racing is no exception. Here's a sampler. ACROSS THE BOARD: This is a bet on one horse to win, place and show. It gets this name because if your horse finishes first, you get all three payoffs shown on the infield tote board -- the win, place and show prices. If the horse runs second, you get both the place and show prices, and if it runs third, you get only the show price. A standard across the board bet costs $6. BLINKERS: Blinkers are headgear worn by horses who have a tendency to be easily distracted.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1996
A wagering foul-up at Laurel Park last week that infuriated bettors was, according to racing officials, an inadvertent human error.A horse presumably scratched from Friday's 10th race was reinstated with no announcement. Many bettors did not realize the No. 13 horse, Honey's Acallade, was running. Although she was 7-2 in the morning line, she paid a glaring $45.80 after winning by a neck.James Mango, Maryland Jockey Club chief administrative officer, and Kenneth A. Schertle, executive director of the Maryland Racing Commission, said this week that their investigations uncovered no fraud.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | May 5, 1996
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- D. Wayne Lukas threw his arms around Bill Young, the 78-year-old owner of Grindstone, when the horses crossed the finish line."We did it!" Lukas shouted, tears filling his eyes at the prospect of having trained a Kentucky Derby winner for Young, a lifelong Kentuckian and one of racing's last real sportsmen.Then, in a heartbeat, exultation turned into apprehension in Young's box in the grandstand. Another horse, Cavonnier, had crossed the finish line even with Grindstone.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | May 16, 1995
ON THE CHILLY afternoon of Oct. 22, 1933, something highly unusual was going on at Old Hilltop. It was a Sunday -- at that time, not a racing date at Pimlico Race Course. Yet more than 7,000 fans filled the stands. No horses would race that day, but it was still a historic day.What was going on? This: The Maryland Jockey Club had invited Baltimoreans to watch the first East Coast test of the totalizator or "tote" -- a revolutionary innovation that racing officials described as "the new betting machine that flashes official odds and total amount of money wagered in electric lights every 60 seconds."
FEATURES
By HELEN B. JONES % | November 15, 1992
If your task is to raise volunteer hours -- lots of hours -- for a worthy cause, you'd better be someone who doesn't take no for an answer. Sandra Vogel is just such a person. As the coordinator since 1990 of Maryland Public Television's Project Reach Out, Ms. Vogel knocks on the doors and rings up the phones of companies big and small, seeking workers willing to donate their time to public schools in the region.As if that isn't enough, she puts together the station's Project Reach Out telethon, held every September to recognize those companies and to let individuals (and businesses she may have missed)
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | May 16, 1995
ON THE CHILLY afternoon of Oct. 22, 1933, something highly unusual was going on at Old Hilltop. It was a Sunday -- at that time, not a racing date at Pimlico Race Course. Yet more than 7,000 fans filled the stands. No horses would race that day, but it was still a historic day.What was going on? This: The Maryland Jockey Club had invited Baltimoreans to watch the first East Coast test of the totalizator or "tote" -- a revolutionary innovation that racing officials described as "the new betting machine that flashes official odds and total amount of money wagered in electric lights every 60 seconds."
FEATURES
By HELEN B. JONES % | November 15, 1992
If your task is to raise volunteer hours -- lots of hours -- for a worthy cause, you'd better be someone who doesn't take no for an answer. Sandra Vogel is just such a person. As the coordinator since 1990 of Maryland Public Television's Project Reach Out, Ms. Vogel knocks on the doors and rings up the phones of companies big and small, seeking workers willing to donate their time to public schools in the region.As if that isn't enough, she puts together the station's Project Reach Out telethon, held every September to recognize those companies and to let individuals (and businesses she may have missed)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.