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NEWS
By Thomas Dorsett | February 14, 1995
She saw on her home streeta host of Judgment soldiersplunder everything,crack shock troops of total war,each a six-foot flame.''Momma, that was many years ago.''It's as if she hears angelsconfined to the head of a matchscream in pain as it ignites: among themher parents and their youngest child.Her family fled to the cellar:she ran, outside, terrorizedby an army of flames,running without looking backuntil she reached Maryland.She never talked about ituntil one day in her old agethe low drone of a jet becamea flock of bombers: she ran outside,fleeing the heat of her stove.
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NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | February 18, 2007
As tickets to the best-sellers list go, it's not quite like getting picked for Oprah's book club. But close. The New Yorker does one long book review each issue. Out of the zillion or so authors who get published each year, only 47 can claim the honor of a feature review in the highbrow near-weekly magazine. Last week, that distinction went to David A. Bell, a Hopkins history professor and author of The First Total War: Napoleon's Europe and the Birth of Warfare As We Know It. And the review was generally positive, to boot.
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NEWS
By Richard Lech and Richard Lech,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 19, 1992
THE DESTRUCTIVE WAR.Charles Royster.Knopf.523 pages. $30. Imagine the United States subdivided into a collection of banana republic-style countries, each operating in constant fear of war with its neighbors or domination by a larger European power.Many Northerners in the 1860s feared such a political nightmare, and that was one of the reasons they were willing to fight such a long and costly Civil War.As Charles Royster puts it, the Unionists foresaw that "the Confederate States and the United States would be in perpetual war. Further political division would follow, burdening the continent with 'jarring, warring fragmentary States,' armies and a 'race of chieftains, who will rival the political bandits of South America and Mexico.
NEWS
By Mike Littwin and Mike Littwin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2005
Review: Novel THE MARCH E.L. Doctorow Random House / 369 pages THE MOST COMPELLING CHARACTER that E.L. Doctorow creates in his Civil War novel, The March, is the march itself. We remember William Tecumseh Sherman's march to the sea from our high school history books as a morality play - but Doctorow is far too subtle a writer and thinker for that, of course. He gives us Sherman's march more as a force of nature that leaves nothing it touches unchanged and no one unmoved. It's not the fog of war that counts here.
ENTERTAINMENT
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2002
I am not a computer geek. I can barely turn a machine on and set up a simple word-processing page. As far as I'm concerned, RAM is a member of the NFL team that left my hometown of Los Angeles for St. Louis. And gigs? Aren't those what any hard-working musician needs to make a living? No surprise, then, that I do not play computer games - at least I didn't until a month ago, when I rediscovered my medieval roots. It started when I took my 8-year-old son to an electronics store to buy yet another cartridge for his Gameboy Advance.
NEWS
May 13, 2004
THE BEHEADING of Nicholas Berg, and the anticipatory videotape image of five captors standing over him, provoke within us a deep and nearly instinctual response. This is so ugly and wrong we want to twist away from it. First the Abu Ghraib prison photos, now this - not that they are in any way equivalent, because they are not. They are each in their own world of darkness. They are connected, yes, but neither outrage justifies or mitigates or balances the other. Together, they are almost too much to grasp.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | December 5, 1991
Washington--Surprise is a substantial military asset and one way to achieve it is by doing something irrational. Japan did 50 years ago.The attack on Pearl Harbor was an exquisitely executed calamity for Japan. It battered American battleships, thereby necessitating the rapid rebuilding of the Navy, this time with more relevant weapons -- aircraft carriers -- at its heart. The rapidity was the result of another American benefit from Pearl Harbor: rage.Every war must end, so before launching war you should consider whether you can conceive, let alone achieve, a successful end. Bright people often ignore banalities such as this.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | February 18, 2007
As tickets to the best-sellers list go, it's not quite like getting picked for Oprah's book club. But close. The New Yorker does one long book review each issue. Out of the zillion or so authors who get published each year, only 47 can claim the honor of a feature review in the highbrow near-weekly magazine. Last week, that distinction went to David A. Bell, a Hopkins history professor and author of The First Total War: Napoleon's Europe and the Birth of Warfare As We Know It. And the review was generally positive, to boot.
NEWS
By Robert Gee and Robert Gee,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 18, 1997
WASHINGTON -- When Friedrich St. Florian was 12 years old, columns of American GIs marched into his Alpine village of Kaprun, Austria, and liberated it from Nazi occupation. Now he is giving something back.Yesterday, the 63-year-old architect was showered with applause at a White House ceremony after he was chosen as the winning designer for the World War II Memorial to be built on the Mall."Out of the crucible of global conflict and total war -- the greatest struggle humankind has ever known -- America emerged as the world's most powerful force for peace and freedom and prosperity," President Clinton said before an audience of congressmen and war veterans.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | April 18, 1991
Conservatism, having flourished like the green bay tree, is now large enough to have many branches. In fact, America's most important argument today is not between liberals and conservatives, but between two conservative factions traditional conservatives and imperial conservatives. It involves the Kurds.Concerning the question of U.S. military intervention in Iraq's civil war, President Bush has the traditional conservative's wariness about uncertain undertakings, a prudent skepticism about the promiscuous minting of abstract rights and duties, and an inclination to anchor U.S. policy in the rock of U.S. national interests.
NEWS
May 13, 2004
THE BEHEADING of Nicholas Berg, and the anticipatory videotape image of five captors standing over him, provoke within us a deep and nearly instinctual response. This is so ugly and wrong we want to twist away from it. First the Abu Ghraib prison photos, now this - not that they are in any way equivalent, because they are not. They are each in their own world of darkness. They are connected, yes, but neither outrage justifies or mitigates or balances the other. Together, they are almost too much to grasp.
TOPIC
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 23, 2003
REMEMBER THE little summer that followed the Cold War's end, when the sun shone bright on a Pax Americana, and market capitalism advanced behind a worldwide drift toward democratic governance? Optimism was rife, inspired by the coming new millennium. We were leaving behind what Raymond Aron, the French philosopher and writer, described as the "century of total war" - 10 decades of disaster piled upon disaster: the massacre of the Armenians, two world wars, the Holocaust, the crimes of the Soviets, the Khmer Rouge, the Red Guards of China, Vietnam.
ENTERTAINMENT
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2002
I am not a computer geek. I can barely turn a machine on and set up a simple word-processing page. As far as I'm concerned, RAM is a member of the NFL team that left my hometown of Los Angeles for St. Louis. And gigs? Aren't those what any hard-working musician needs to make a living? No surprise, then, that I do not play computer games - at least I didn't until a month ago, when I rediscovered my medieval roots. It started when I took my 8-year-old son to an electronics store to buy yet another cartridge for his Gameboy Advance.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2002
OCEANPORT, N.J. - The real War Emblem returned to the track yesterday. With Medaglia d'Oro dominating the Jim Dandy Stakes three hours away at Saratoga and no legitimate speed horse around to challenge his pace, War Emblem raced away from four rivals and became the first Kentucky Derby winner to capture the $1 million Haskell Invitational at Monmouth Park. On the lead from the break after an unnerving moment in the gate, War Emblem justified his 3-10 odds and covered the 1 1/8 miles in 1 minute, 48 1/5 seconds to add another prestigious victory to a 3-year-old resume that includes wins in the Illinois and Kentucky derbies, and the Preakness.
NEWS
By Robert Gee and Robert Gee,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 18, 1997
WASHINGTON -- When Friedrich St. Florian was 12 years old, columns of American GIs marched into his Alpine village of Kaprun, Austria, and liberated it from Nazi occupation. Now he is giving something back.Yesterday, the 63-year-old architect was showered with applause at a White House ceremony after he was chosen as the winning designer for the World War II Memorial to be built on the Mall."Out of the crucible of global conflict and total war -- the greatest struggle humankind has ever known -- America emerged as the world's most powerful force for peace and freedom and prosperity," President Clinton said before an audience of congressmen and war veterans.
NEWS
By Thomas Dorsett | February 14, 1995
She saw on her home streeta host of Judgment soldiersplunder everything,crack shock troops of total war,each a six-foot flame.''Momma, that was many years ago.''It's as if she hears angelsconfined to the head of a matchscream in pain as it ignites: among themher parents and their youngest child.Her family fled to the cellar:she ran, outside, terrorizedby an army of flames,running without looking backuntil she reached Maryland.She never talked about ituntil one day in her old agethe low drone of a jet becamea flock of bombers: she ran outside,fleeing the heat of her stove.
TOPIC
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 23, 2003
REMEMBER THE little summer that followed the Cold War's end, when the sun shone bright on a Pax Americana, and market capitalism advanced behind a worldwide drift toward democratic governance? Optimism was rife, inspired by the coming new millennium. We were leaving behind what Raymond Aron, the French philosopher and writer, described as the "century of total war" - 10 decades of disaster piled upon disaster: the massacre of the Armenians, two world wars, the Holocaust, the crimes of the Soviets, the Khmer Rouge, the Red Guards of China, Vietnam.
NEWS
By Mike Littwin and Mike Littwin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2005
Review: Novel THE MARCH E.L. Doctorow Random House / 369 pages THE MOST COMPELLING CHARACTER that E.L. Doctorow creates in his Civil War novel, The March, is the march itself. We remember William Tecumseh Sherman's march to the sea from our high school history books as a morality play - but Doctorow is far too subtle a writer and thinker for that, of course. He gives us Sherman's march more as a force of nature that leaves nothing it touches unchanged and no one unmoved. It's not the fog of war that counts here.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | November 30, 1994
Football, or even all of sports, never had an event to equal the circumstances that existed in Baltimore exactly 50 years ago. It was the only time Army played Navy when they were ranked the No. 1 and No. 2 teams in the country -- plus the fact you had first to buy a war bond before becoming eligible to purchase a ticket. Furthermore, because of railroad travel restrictions, the corps and brigade of the academies came to the game by ship.The entire mission was guarded by World War II censorship rules.
NEWS
By Richard Lech and Richard Lech,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 19, 1992
THE DESTRUCTIVE WAR.Charles Royster.Knopf.523 pages. $30. Imagine the United States subdivided into a collection of banana republic-style countries, each operating in constant fear of war with its neighbors or domination by a larger European power.Many Northerners in the 1860s feared such a political nightmare, and that was one of the reasons they were willing to fight such a long and costly Civil War.As Charles Royster puts it, the Unionists foresaw that "the Confederate States and the United States would be in perpetual war. Further political division would follow, burdening the continent with 'jarring, warring fragmentary States,' armies and a 'race of chieftains, who will rival the political bandits of South America and Mexico.
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