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BUSINESS
December 30, 1994
Tomorrow, the Business section will publish expanded stock tables, showing price changes and other information for the year rather than for the week. And on Sunday, New Year's Day, the section will include an expanded mutual fund table with performance figures for 1994, including total return and the distribution of capital gains and dividends for the year.@
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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2011
Joseph N. Geier established his namesake financial services firm in Howard County by cultivating an exclusive client list of professional athletes: Baltimore Orioles legend Cal Ripken Jr. , New York Yankees first baseman Mark Teixeira and Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Brad Lidge. Over the years since it was founded in the 1990s, Geier Financial Group expanded the business by managing the money of other wealthy clients and high-net-worth retirees in Maryland. Now Geier is getting into the competitive mutual fund business, having recently launched a new product intended to appeal not only to the firm's wealthy clients but also to mom-and-pop investors.
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BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2001
Four Maryland companies are among the 100 fastest growing publicly held small businesses, according to the latest issue of Fortune Small Business. Companies were ranked based on three criteria: earnings growth, revenue growth and total stock return including dividends. The rankings were averaged to find the fastest growing, according to the magazine. Combined, the companies delivered $2.68 billion in net income in 2000 while employing 76,568 people. Thirty-seven percent were tech firms.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
Marriottsville's Geier Asset Management announced Tuesday the launch of its first mutual fund that focuses on long-term return from income and capital appreciation. The Geier Strategic Total Return Fund, with $27.5 million in assets, will be managed by Thomas M. Geier, vice president and chief operating officer of Geier Asset Management. Geier Asset Management is a division of Geier Financial Group, a financial services firm which handles the personal finances of former Baltimore Oriole Cal Ripken Jr. and other baseball players.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE | October 20, 2002
IN AN UNUSUAL phenomenon, the total return on fixed-income mutual funds is stomping the average yield on the bonds those funds own. If you invest in an intermediate Treasury note today, your yield will be significantly less than 4 percent. Yet the total return on the average intermediate Treasury mutual fund over the past year is 12 percent. Pick virtually any category of bond and the story is the same: big gains for bond funds despite small yields on the bonds they own. The discrepancy is so big that it can't possibly continue for long.
BUSINESS
By Glenn Burkins and Glenn Burkins,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 19, 1992
Despite low interest rates, people are still flocking to certificates of deposit.Why: Because most CDs are federally insured, and that makes them super-safe. In exchange for that safety, investors must accept lower rates.But there are other interest-paying investments that, if used properly, will generate greater income without a lot of unnecessary risks.Take Treasury securities. Like CDs, they are federally insured against default. Their underlying values may fluctuate, but that risk is erased if Treasuries are held until they mature.
BUSINESS
By Werner Renberg and Werner Renberg,Contributing Writer | November 8, 1992
One of your most important investment decisions allocating money among cash equivalents, bonds, and stocks.Just how you should allocate your assets depends on your investment objectives and tolerance for risk.For example, when you're younger and expect to be invested for many years -- while markets fluctuate but your pay goes up -- you may be able to afford higher risks while shooting for higher returns.To accommodate people with different risk/return targets, Fidelity has created three no-load asset allocation funds with different investment objectives: Fidelity Asset Manager, started in December 1988 to seek high total return with reduced risk; Fidelity Asset Manager: Growth, started last December to seek high total return more aggressively, and Fidelity Asset Manager: Income, launched last month, to generate income.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | October 31, 1990
The San Francisco Bay Area was holding vigils to commemorate the anniversary of the tragic 1989 earthquake, and the third anniversary of the 1987 Wall Street crash was ticking by. Cataclysmic times breed reflection and conservatism.Headquartered in a modern seven-story white concrete building just off Mariners Island Boulevard in this bedroom community of San Mateo, Calif. is a company that styles itself as a beacon for investment conservatism. The Franklin Group of mutual funds is the depository of more than $44 billion in assets of cautious folks who don't want financial surprises.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | October 11, 2000
Before the holidays set in," says Financial Planning Perspectives, "investors should reflect on how 2000 affected their finances, and what moves to make in 2001 to improve the picture. Suggestions: Ask yourself if any personal life changes -- marriage, birth of a child, divorce, illness, inheritance, etc. -- occurred this year or may occur in 2001. If necessary, rebalance your investments. Make sure they match your goals and circumstances. To save taxes, consider selling losers to offset gains of winners.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE and CHARLES JAFFE,MARKETWATCH | April 9, 2006
There was no red carpet and no televised interviews with famous fund managers. No one teared up giving an acceptance speech. But the 2006 Lipper Fund Awards - and in fact any of the awards given out by the major research and data firms - should have left an impression on investors. The Lipper Fund Awards, annual prizes first presented in 2003, reward "consistently strong risk-adjusted performance." What investors should be focused on with the Lipper prizes - as well as Morningstar's Fund Manager of the Year awards - is not the names of the winners but the method for choosing them.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETRUNO and TOM PETRUNO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 4, 2006
You now can earn an annualized yield of 5.25 percent on a six-month U.S. Treasury bill, the most that security has paid in more than five years. Can't get too excited about 5.25 percent? True, it's barely halfway to a double-digit return. But as Albert Einstein noted, everything's relative. The T-bill rate is more than twice the 2.5 percent a year that the Standard & Poor's 500 stock index has earned over the past five years, including dividends. A 5.25 percent return, compounded, would double your money in 13.6 years.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE and CHARLES JAFFE,MARKETWATCH | April 9, 2006
There was no red carpet and no televised interviews with famous fund managers. No one teared up giving an acceptance speech. But the 2006 Lipper Fund Awards - and in fact any of the awards given out by the major research and data firms - should have left an impression on investors. The Lipper Fund Awards, annual prizes first presented in 2003, reward "consistently strong risk-adjusted performance." What investors should be focused on with the Lipper prizes - as well as Morningstar's Fund Manager of the Year awards - is not the names of the winners but the method for choosing them.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | May 16, 2004
IT'S 7 A.M. on a Friday, and McCormick & Co. Inc.'s stock is within hours of hitting another all-time high. Wearing a cinnamon-sage sport coat, a mustard floral-print shirt and no tie, McCormick CEO Robert J. Lawless is explaining to a couple of dozen plant workers the savory feat they have helped accomplish. "In the years 2000, 2001, 2002," Lawless tells the employees, as he later recalls, "to have a growth company, period, is just stellar performance by everybody." Indeed it is. The early 2000s were a growth-company graveyard.
BUSINESS
By Emily Hall and Emily Hall,MORNINGSTAR.COM | August 10, 2003
I am trying to compare Fidelity Spartan 500 Index with Vanguard 500 Index. Why are the NAVs (net asset values) for these two funds so different? Their expenses and holdings are pretty similar. It's good to see you are comparison-shopping. But, it turns out, focusing on NAVs won't tell you much about a fund. A fund's NAV is its "price per share." To calculate NAV, the fund company adds together the underlying value of all the securities in a fund's portfolio, subtracts the fund's expenses and then divides by the number of fund shares.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE | October 20, 2002
IN AN UNUSUAL phenomenon, the total return on fixed-income mutual funds is stomping the average yield on the bonds those funds own. If you invest in an intermediate Treasury note today, your yield will be significantly less than 4 percent. Yet the total return on the average intermediate Treasury mutual fund over the past year is 12 percent. Pick virtually any category of bond and the story is the same: big gains for bond funds despite small yields on the bonds they own. The discrepancy is so big that it can't possibly continue for long.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2001
Four Maryland companies are among the 100 fastest growing publicly held small businesses, according to the latest issue of Fortune Small Business. Companies were ranked based on three criteria: earnings growth, revenue growth and total stock return including dividends. The rankings were averaged to find the fastest growing, according to the magazine. Combined, the companies delivered $2.68 billion in net income in 2000 while employing 76,568 people. Thirty-seven percent were tech firms.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,Washington Post Writers Group | March 22, 1992
New York -- It's rough out there in the interest-rate jungle. Savers and investors are making decisions based on tiny differences in yields. But those differences may not be worth the sweat. Here's an interest-rate primer, to help you judge.* Banks. Bank certificates of deposit disclose two things: Simple interest, which is the annual rate applied to your money; and effective yield, which shows what you earn when your interest compounds. A one-year CD paying 4.67 percent compounded daily produces an annual effective yield of 4.78 percent.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | October 11, 2000
Before the holidays set in," says Financial Planning Perspectives, "investors should reflect on how 2000 affected their finances, and what moves to make in 2001 to improve the picture. Suggestions: Ask yourself if any personal life changes -- marriage, birth of a child, divorce, illness, inheritance, etc. -- occurred this year or may occur in 2001. If necessary, rebalance your investments. Make sure they match your goals and circumstances. To save taxes, consider selling losers to offset gains of winners.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | March 1, 2000
IN THIS volatile market, are you putting money in CDs instead of stocks? "If you're buying CDs, stagger the maturities," says Black Enterprise, March. "Put some in one-year certificates, some in two-year maturities. That way your CDs will mature each year and if you need cash you won't pay a withdrawal penalty. Use different banks for different CDs, locking in the highest possible rates." "Too many investors look at mutual funds with recent strong performances and buy those `hot' funds.
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